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I am trying to find the longest sequence of decreasing numbers in an array. I am not sure what I am doing incorrectly in the following code.

public static int getDecSeq(double[] data) {
  int currentSeq = 1;
  int currentIndex = 1;

  int longestSeq = 0;
  int longestIndex = 0;
  for (int i = currentIndex; i < data.length; i++) {
    if (data[i] < data[i - 1]) {
      currentSeq++;
    } else {
      currentSeq = 1;
      currentIndex = i;
    }
    if (currentSeq > longestSeq) {
      longestSeq = currentSeq;
      longestIndex = currentIndex;
    }
    //double[] sequence = new double[longestSeq];
    //for (int j = longestIndex; j < longestSeq; j++) {
      //sequence[j]
    //}
  }
  return longestSeq;
}//close getDecSeq 

Looks like now the real problem is how to set up data correctly so that I can use it in the method.

getData(input) returns a bunch of numbers from a file and stores them in an array.

I wrote:

double[] data = getData(input);
System.out.println("longest sequence is" + getDecSeq(data));

I am doing this incorrectly. My methods work. When I declared the variable data as:

double[] data = {119.1, 186.4, 46.3, 89.0 ...};

Everything worked just fine. So how do rewrite the way I call data to work?

getData is

public static double[] getData(Scanner input) {
   double[] list = new double[70]; //Construct an array, length 70, to hold values from file
   int count = 0;
   while (input.hasNextDouble()) {
      double n = input.nextDouble();
      list[count] = n;
      count++;
   }
   double[] newList = new double[count];
   for (int i = 0; i < newList.length; i++ ) {
      newList[i] = list[i];

   }
   return newList;
}//close getData
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6  
What's your problem ? Please give an example for which your algorithm does not work... –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 20:35
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/3878105/… (but don't copy!) –  Mark Peters Nov 4 '10 at 20:58
1  
Whats's your getData ? Please post the code of this function. –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:28
    
It's in the question now. –  Robert Nov 4 '10 at 21:36
1  
Inspect the result of getData (try System.out.println(Arrays.toString(getData(input)));) Do the array contents match what you expect to see? Maybe you're misunderstanding the file format (e.g., does maybe the first line in the file say how many doubles follow?) –  Mark Peters Nov 4 '10 at 21:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks strikingly like my pseudocode posted here. One edge case you haven't covered is what to return if the loop is never run. I would treat these as special cases.

e.g.

 if ( data.length < 2 ) return data.length;
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, very similar ! –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:38

Is 4444444 considered to be decreasing? If not then you want to check for strictly < rather than <=.

Could you provide a bit more, such as where your answer fails?

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I think that may be what Robert might be looking for. –  Jeff Mercado Nov 4 '10 at 20:42
    
Thanks for catching that. I forgot to get rid of the = but that still does not make it work. –  Robert Nov 4 '10 at 20:51
    
@Robert Please please give an example !! –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:01
    
Turns out the method was correct and the data (the actual array) was declared incorrectly. –  Robert Nov 4 '10 at 21:15
    
@Robert : good ! Look at answers from johnbk (shorter code) and user434507 (bug corrected) below. And please choose one of the answers . –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:18

Take a look at when you assign longestSeq and longestIndex. It will help if you sketch out on paper first what you intend the algorithm to do for a given test input, and then run the algorithm while watching (printing) the Seq and Index values on each iteration.

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As far as I can tell, the code will correctly calculate the length of the longest sequence, there's only one bug that makes it incorrectly calculate the starting position of that sequence in some cases. Change it to this:

int currentSeq = 1;
int currentIndex = 0;

int longestSeq = 0;
int longestIndex = 0;
for (int i = 1; i < data.length; i++) {
...
share|improve this answer
    
Might be the problem indeed but because the output is longestSeq the code should work anyway... –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 20:44
    
If current index starts at 0, there will be an ArrayOutOfBoundsException thrown on the first check. Notice the data[i - 1] –  Reese Moore Nov 4 '10 at 20:46
    
but i starts at 1. –  user434507 Nov 4 '10 at 20:48
    
@Reese Moore Look closely at the code. i starts at 1. –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:03
    
Oh, I see, but then the definition of where currentIndex starts is irrelevant. You don't even need to keep track of it. You could just calculate the longest index by taking the end of the new longest sequence and subtracting the end of it. –  Reese Moore Nov 4 '10 at 21:35

I think this could be a little bit simpler.
You don't actually need to keep the index if you don't need it.

public int getDecSeq(double[] data)
{

    int curSequence = 1;
    int maxSequence = 1;

    for (int i = 1; i <= data.Length - 1; i++) {
        if (data[i] > data[i - 1]) {
            if (curSequence > maxSequence) {
                maxSequence = curSequence;
            }

            curSequence = 1;
        } else {
            curSequence += 1;
        }
    }

    if (curSequence > maxSequence) {
        maxSequence = curSequence;
    }

    return maxSequence;
}
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I see lot of redundant logic..i think this would do..

public static int getDecSeq(int[] data) {
        int currentSeq = 1, longestSeq = 1;

        for (int i = 1; i < data.length; i++) {
            currentSeq = (data[i] < data[i - 1]) ? currentSeq + 1 : 1;
            if (currentSeq > longestSeq)
                longestSeq = currentSeq;
        }
        return longestSeq;
    }

I considered @Reese Moore's suggestion.

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1  
Attention, if the sequence has only one element you'll return 0 but we want 1. longestSeq must start at 1 –  Loïc Février Nov 4 '10 at 21:18
    
@Loïc Février - Thanks, edited now. –  Johnbabu Koppolu Nov 5 '10 at 9:11

Looks like now the real problem is how to set up data correctly so that I can use it in the method.

I hadn't declared the array correctly in order to use it in the method. But the method works just fine.

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