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I have a site that uses javascript to launch a css overlay of a google map (see [link deleted because I can only have one at a time] and click the 'Enlarge' button under the map).

This doesn't work on the ipad. I believe it has something to do with this not being a link, but using the jquery live('click',.. approach. I need to fix this but I'm new to using the ipad and I don't even know how to step through the javascript to see what the problem is.

What kind of development tools are available for testing on the ipad?

Edit: My mistake. The link above works fine in the iPad - no problem bringing up the larger map. However the sister site http://lowes-realty.com/Stateline-Plaza_Enfield_CT-11.aspx is not working. What I need is a development system that will let me look at them both on the ipad (I really want to avoid emulating or spoofing).

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4 Answers 4

Have you tried firebug lite? http://getfirebug.com/firebuglite#Install

Have you tested this in google chrome? As google chrome is a webkit browser, you may be able to do the majority of your debugging in chrome, and iron out smaller issues on the iPad itself.

Edit:
Removed unnecessary comment about iPad.

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I'd upvote this, but the totally unnecessary and off-topic slam on the iPad cancelled it out. I'd say 95% of the current tablet market is "worth it" for a developer. –  ceejayoz Nov 4 '10 at 21:55
    
Your statistics are biased as the "current tablet market" doesn't include netbooks, or tablet versions of netbooks. There's no (simple) way to distinguish a netbook from a laptop from a PC when calculating user stats. I put the "slam" on the iPad as an opinion for a reason. I feel it is more important to make cross-browser accessible applications that work on everything, rather than focusing specifically on one device. –  zzzzBov Nov 4 '10 at 22:01
    
Why would you count non-tablet netbooks in the tablet market? –  ceejayoz Nov 4 '10 at 22:02
    
Re: your update to your comment... he's is building a cross-browser site. It's not an iPad site, there's just a part that doesn't work on the iPad that he's trying to fix. –  ceejayoz Nov 4 '10 at 22:04
    
Because that was the user base that Jobs was targeting with the iPad. He specifically compared the iPad to a netbook, not a laptop, not a PC, not a media player. I'd say that they're part of the same market, but again</opinion> –  zzzzBov Nov 4 '10 at 22:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem ended up being that I had a javascript error that aborted the script before I ever got to the jQuery code. Once I fixed that, I was able to use jQuery without making any special modifications for the ipad - awesome! I did not have to do anything with the swipe or tap events (sweet!).

However I was not able to get any kind of javascript debugger; I had to work this one out for myself. As of Nov '09 firebug lite crashed the ipad for me and there don't seem to be any developer tools build for testing the ipad. I tried several sites that claimed to perform the same way the ipad does in your browser and not one of them held water.

I have no reason to believe that there is a good option for debugging a site on an ipad (yet).

Edit A Year Later... I'm still looking for a good way to develop on an iPad. I just got Adobe Shadow up and running - it's not actually a useful tool, but there is potential (http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-technology-sneaks-2012/adobe-shadow). Right now (3-29-12) the code inspector is essentially non-functional (cannot view inherited styles, can't view elements without expanding the DOM from the body element, no javascript debugging, and much more).

I know that sounds hopeless, but it has one thing going for it that nothing else I'm aware of does: Shadow works with all existing mobile devices and its code inspector is independent of device and browser. So although the inspector sucks spectacularly right now, once they build some functionality into it Shadow could be a good solution. From their site:

Shadow will be updated regularly to stay ahead of web standards, web browser updates and support for new mobile devices entering the market, while incorporating user feedback to provide the best functionality and experience possible.

~ http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/shadow/

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There are a few much more viable alternatives. –  josh3736 Mar 30 '12 at 21:13

I think the problem is that on the iPhone / iPad there are no clicks events generated but instead touch events (swipe, tap).

You can use something like jQTouch (you can start reading here Getting started and then proceed to callback events hint: tap==click).

If you have more to adapt you can also look at (and wait for a stable release) of jQuery Mobile

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I was under the impression MobileSafari triggered both touch and click events. –  ceejayoz Nov 4 '10 at 21:58
    
The first site (now deleted from the post - damn you reputation points!!) works without using jQTouch or any other libraries. I don't know how though because I can't compare what is happening here, but not happening on the other site. My kingdom for a javascript debugger!! –  doub1ejack Nov 6 '10 at 0:08
    
Well now I'm really confused. It turns out this specific problem didn't have anything to do with the type of event. There was a JS error that prevented the div.live('click'... script from running. Once I removed that the jquery live code worked fine - I didn't modify anything. So does that tell us that we can use the normal jquery click event to capture on the iPad? I think so.. –  doub1ejack Nov 6 '10 at 2:18

weinre lets you remotely attach a WebKit inspector (the built-in Dev Tools you use on desktop browsers) to a page running on your mobile device (iPad/iPhone/iPod/Android/BlackBerry 6/webOS) over WiFi.

JavaScript debugging is limited to console.logs, but it's better than nothing.


If you have an ICS device, Chrome Mobile lets you remotely attach a full-featured Inspector (with full JS debugging/breakpoints) over USB. I've been thoroughly thrilled using this tool with my Galaxy Nexus.

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