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Which one of the two alternatives below is more efficient? Any recommendations to further improve it?

Alternative A:

for i in BAR_Items:
    if BAR_Items[i] != A and SHAPE[i+"_SHP"] != A: continue
    if i in Selection:
        Selection.remove(i)
        BAR_Items[i].clearActions()
        BAR_Items[i].add(vizact.spinTo(axisAngle=[0,1,0,90],speed=300))
        VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " has been deselected. "+ str(Selection))
    else:
        Selection.append(i)
        BAR_Items[i].add(vizact.spin(0,1,0,90,viz.FOREVER))
        VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " selected. " + str(Selection))
    break

Alternative B:

for i in BAR_Items:
    if BAR_Items[i] == A or SHAPE[i+"_SHP"] == A:
        if i in Selection:
            Selection.remove(i)
            BAR_Items[i].clearActions()
            BAR_Items[i].add(vizact.spinTo(axisAngle=[0,1,0,90],speed=300))
            VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " has been deselected. "+ str(Selection))
        else:
            Selection.append(i)
            BAR_Items[i].add(vizact.spin(0,1,0,90,viz.FOREVER))
            VFrame.SetStatusText(frame, i + " selected. " + str(Selection))
        break

Ok, I followed the suggestions and found a way of timing it. After measuring it 500 times, B (0.001279264 seconds) is faster than A (0.001966169 seconds) on average (the numbers are the average).

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2  
When you measured them, what did you learn? Please include the timing information from running these. –  S.Lott Nov 4 '10 at 21:33
    
@S.Lott: @relima: Will it even run except in special circumstance? The use of index and items from list is erroneous. –  pyfunc Nov 4 '10 at 21:38
    
@pyfunc: "Will it even run"? Very important. All "what is more efficient" questions should include metrics to show that (a) it actually runs and (b) which is more efficient. –  S.Lott Nov 4 '10 at 21:41
    
@S.Lott, I am trying to get timit to run here, but I am not sure it will do. this bit of code is running inside an instantiated opengl engine and timit is having problems; I am going to try and rewrite it outside the larger opengl function, but then the objects wont be created and might give different results. However, the code runs always and it looks like A is giving me higher frame rates. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 21:51
    
@S.Lott, just measured. B is faster than A. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok here is a contrived way to look at the performance. Since we are trying to see the difference between using "continue" or pull the code inside the "if block .."

Here is a small experiment.

def f():
    x = {'a':'b', 'c':'d', 'e':'d'}
    for l in x:
        if x[l] != 'd': continue
        print x

def f1():
    x = {'a':'b', 'c':'d', 'e':'d'}
    for l in x:
        if x[l] == 'd':
            print x       

import dis
print dis.dis(f)   
print dis.dis(f1)  

Most of the operations are same and here is a small difference:

In case of f:

56 POP_TOP             
57 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           34
60 JUMP_FORWARD             1 (to 64)
63 POP_TOP             

64 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
67 PRINT_ITEM          
68 PRINT_NEWLINE       
69 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           34
72 POP_BLOCK           
73 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
76 RETURN_VALUE  

In case of f1:

56 POP_TOP             

57 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
60 PRINT_ITEM          
61 PRINT_NEWLINE       
62 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           34
65 POP_TOP             
66 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           34
69 POP_BLOCK           
70 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
73 RETURN_VALUE 

Verdict

Just one OP difference. Really not much right. There are equivalent. Base your decision on readability rather than performance.

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My Bar_items is actually a dictionary which returns an object. A is the object which it is compared against. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 21:43
    
@relima: Oh me! –  pyfunc Nov 4 '10 at 21:45
    
This is awesome. Thanks for such hard work. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 22:03
    
@pyfunc, I think you have a mistake. f prints x >= 1 and f1 prints x < 2. –  aaronasterling Nov 4 '10 at 22:08
    
And your index variable is getting optimized out because you don't ever use it. after for l in x:, you refer to x as the index variable. –  aaronasterling Nov 4 '10 at 22:14

One of the best ways to test efficiency is with the timeit module. I would put each alternative in a function, run timeit on each function, and compare.

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For code where performance isn't absolutely critical, ask yourself "which is more understandable" and use that as your answer. A difference of a few microseconds just isn't worth the time to fret over in scripted code.

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1  
The difference has so far being having my program dropping my opengl refresh rate from 90fps to 45 fps because of that little difference. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 22:42
    
Right now, at the stage I am, this isn't a lot of trouble, but it would surely affect me later when I try to render a larger number of animated objects. –  relima Nov 4 '10 at 22:45
    
@relima: are you really saying that by only adding the continue statement you improved your refresh rate by 100%? According to the answer by pyfunc the difference is a single opcode. Even run millions of times I don't see how it could have that effect. Regardless, when doing performance critical code the only answer to "which is faster" is to time your own code. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 5 '10 at 16:38

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