Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I know that a lot of examples exist where a SqlConnection is defined and then a SqlCommand is defined, both in Using blocks:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connString)) {
      using (var cmd = new SqlCommand()) {
        cmd.Connection = conn;
        //open the connection
      }
}

My question: If I define the connection directly on the SqlCommand, does the connection close when the command is disposed?

using (var cmd = new SqlCommand()) {
      cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection(connString);
      //open the connection
}
share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

No, SqlCommand never attempts to close/dispose of the connection.

share|improve this answer

No, the connection object will not be disposed until you dispose it explicitly. But my recommendation is to use using blocks whenever you can.

share|improve this answer

It does not close the connection, you need to either close it yourself or put it in its own using statment.

Also here is a tip to make your using blocks a bit more readable:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connString))
using (var cmd = new SqlCommand())
{
    cmd.Connection = conn;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice Andrew, I've never seen that combo before. Will have to give that a try. I've always nesting multiple "using blocks", which can make code harder to read at times. – barneytron Jan 4 '09 at 6:19
1  
IMO, that makes them LESS readable. I'm OK with losing the curly's, just not the part where you're not indenting the inner using. – Robert C. Barth Jan 5 '09 at 21:46
    
I'm definitely NOT OK with losing the curly braces and nesting - this is proven to lead to more error prone code, especially when sloppier JR's start muxxing around with stuff. – hajikelist Jun 8 '15 at 21:51

@milot

But my recommendation is to use using blocks whenever you can.

Using Using Blocks is nice but useless when working with non IDisposable Objects and so this can be confusing if you use Using Blocks anywhere.

Be careful since your objects might not being Disposed if they don't implements IDisposable.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
3  
Hmm, I don't think the compiler will let you use "using" blocks for objects that don't implement IDisposable. I vaguely remember getting a compilation error last time I tried that, which was several years ago. – barneytron Jan 4 '09 at 6:22
3  
Using Using Blocks is nice but useless when working with non IDisposable Objects, You can't use using with non IDisposable objects. – Habib Feb 18 '14 at 20:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.