Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to get the knack of good system design. As there is no hard and fast rules for good system design, I request you to give me some valuable suggestions. I prepared an imaginary system and prepared a design for that. Please let me know if you think if this design is good or bad. Is there a better way? I used Abstract Factory and Dependency Injection in the solution.

Problem:

Design a system which runs in cars and controls it. The requirement is to make a system for Volkswagen Golf controlling components like engine, electrical, gearbox etc.

There can be different versions of Golf like BlueMotion, Twist, GT etc which uses different components. For example if GT uses engine a and electrical b, BlueMotion can use engine c and electrical d.

The engines, electricals and other components in different cars could be similiar, or could be completely different. For example a "Flat 4 CRDI" Engine uses CRDI technology for fuel injection and have a certain behaviour to reduce vibration. A "PumpeDuse V6" engine uses PD injection and its own method for reducing vibration which is completely different from "Flat4 CRDI". The difference is not only in the handling the vibrations but also most of the aspects of Engine behaviour.

As of now, the system model should handle the starting of Engine. Starting the engine means use power from the electrical system and crank the engine and keep idling. To start with, make a Golf "GT" with "Pumpe Duse E250" Engine and "BoschR10" Electrical system. However, many different series could be launched in the future and system should be able to extend the functionality and car models with minimal trouble.

Update: Code edited as per suggestions.

Code:

class Electrical
{
public:
    virtual void OpenCircuit() = 0;
};

class Engine
{
public:
    virtual void Crank(Electrical *) = 0;
};

class CarComponentFactory
{
public:
    virtual Engine* CreateEngine()=0;
    virtual Electrical* CreateElectrical()=0;
};

class PumpeDuseE250:public Engine
{
    virtual void Crank(Electrical *pEle)
    {
        pEle->OpenCircuit();
        //Do the crank
    }
};

class BoschR10: public Electrical
{
    virtual void OpenCircuit()
    {
        //Open the Circuit
    }
};

class GTFactory:public CarComponentFactory
{
public:
    virtual Engine* CreateEngine()
    {
        return new PumpeDuseE250();
    }

    virtual Electrical* CreateElectrical()
    {
        return new BoschR10();
    }
};

class VWGolf
{
    auto_ptr<Engine> mpEngine;
    auto_ptr<Electrical> mpElectrical;      
public:
    VWGolf(Engine *pEngine, Electrical *pElectrical):mpEngine(pEngine), mpElectrical(pElectrical)
    {
    }

    void Start()
    {
        mpEngine->Crank(mpElectrical.get());
    }

    ~VWGolf()
    {           
    }
};

Example for Creating Objects:

void main()
{
    GTFactory Factory;
    VWGolf golfGT(Factory.CreateEngine(), Factory.CreateElectrical());
    golfGT.Start();
}

Note that the names like "BoschR10" are imaginary.

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know how useful this is, but I'd really start by finding a realistic use case. All those made-up examples like modelling cars and animals just encourage you to attempt to model everything. The only way to achieve good design is to model only that which needs modelling. In real-world cases, that's fairly easy. But when modelling make-pretend cars, where do you stop? Should I model each wheel separately? What about the doors? Engine power? Car radio? And so on. –  jalf Nov 5 '10 at 1:29
    
There are a million details in a car that you could model explicitly, or you could pretend they don't exist. And making that decision is what gives you a good design. Correctly determining what needs to be in your model at all, and what should just be left out. And that is why made-up examples like this always just lead to a big soup of inheritance hierarchies, rather than a (good) design. –  jalf Nov 5 '10 at 1:29
    
Why do so many functions need to be virtual? Could some of the polymorphism benefit from being implemented with templates? Do you need separate classes for the different engine types? Could they be implemented as a single class that is just initialized differently? Probably, but it is impossible to tell, because it's a made-up example and so it is missing all the context you need to answer these questions. Until you know what these car classes are for, there's no reason to write more than this: struct Car {}; Car vwGolf; to define and instantiate a car. Beyond that it depends on context –  jalf Nov 5 '10 at 1:32
    
@jalf. I thought making the problem simple and well known can lead to a common opinion, hence opted cars. IMHO, a real world use case could get long and lead to more different opinions. The problem actually tells about what to be there in the model. The car contains just an engine and electrical, we can avoid the other components. However, I need to explain what assumptions I made by modelling this. –  Jimmy Nov 5 '10 at 11:26
1  
Still doesn't explain why you need separate Engine classes. Why not one engine class that I can parametrize in the constructor? Don't all engines have the same properties (max speed, acceleration, fuel efficiency and so on)? The point I'm trying to make is that you're basically building a house out of legos, and then looking at that house and saying "so what can I learn about houses from this?" and the answer is nothing because the model contains nothing that you didn't put there yourself, nothing you don't already know. –  jalf Nov 5 '10 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd remove the dependency between factories (actually apply dependency injection) and VWGolf and I'd make sure to be using RAII instead of raw pointers. You're main should look more like so:

void main() // still not applying RAII
{
  GTFactory factory;
  VWGolf golfGT(factory.CreateEngine(), factory.CreateElectrical());
  golfGT.Start();
}

Count how many mocks you'd have to make in order to test VWGolf with your way vs. mine.

share|improve this answer
    
@Noah, I can see removing the factory from VWGolf could be theoretically advantageous. But, you can now make golfs with different factories. For example, for a specific car you can create engine from GTFactory and create electrical from BlueMotionFactory. Is that acceptable? I haven't done mock tests yet, so I will do some reading and get back to you. –  Jimmy Nov 5 '10 at 15:41
    
It's not only acceptable, but could very well end up being a future change. Should the customer say, "We now have a new car that uses the GT engine and the BM electrical," you could respond in two ways: 1) reuse the GT and BM factories; or 2) make a new factory that either uses the others or has the same code. I prefer option 1 for two reasons: 1) it's less work and more in line with reuse and OCP; and 2) it looks more like the requirement statement that caused the change (I like my code to resemble the domain whenever possible). ... –  Crazy Eddie Nov 5 '10 at 16:01
    
Yeah, it's a small nit and pretty much pure theory but that's the kind of question asked, no? In production code it would be one of those things that I'd say, "Well, it's not perfect but it's certainly good enough." But there ARE practical concerns behind all "theory" considerations. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 5 '10 at 16:03
1  
The mock thing goes like so... You want to test each unit on its own in a controlled environment. Doing this entirely 'correctly' requires the use of mocks. If you're testing the VWGolf class you make a testing engine and a testing electrical (assuming VWGolf actually does something with these objects in Start()). If you keep the factory parameter, I build my dependencies myself, method that you've got here then you also need a testing factory. Seems again like a small nit but again there are practical concerns behind all theory. It's sometimes hard to see the effects in small examples. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 5 '10 at 16:06
    
Actually, thinking about it again, I'd only just come up with the idea of wrapping the GT and BM factories into a new factory and hadn't given it enough thought. I'd probably do that. I would still remove the dependency because objects building their dependencies is something that smells to me and it reduces dependencies. I don't know that it would happen but I should be able to build the object without the factory, and I could if the interface didn't artificially require factories. The main objection I have is that the dependency between VWGolf and factories is not needed, so I'd lose it. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 5 '10 at 16:12

Here's what I'd do:

start with the basics:

class Car {};

and then extend on it as needed.

The thing is, so far, there are no further requirements. There is no requirement that the car uses the different components for anything, so I leave them out for now. We just have to be able to create a car with specific components. But until we know what these components are supposed to do, there's no reason to make them anything more than a comment:

// create a car using engine A and gearbox B
Car car1;

// create one with engine C and electrical D
Car car2;

And there we are. This is my design. Given this starting point, it takes very little code to extend the system when you come up with more requirements. There is virtually nothing that can break, or require rewrites when the requirements change. It is simple and clean.

So for now, I conclude that this is the ideal design matching your requirements. It is far more robust, far more efficient and far less likely to contain bugs than your big inheritance hierarchy. And it is one hundred percent reusable code too.

As you've probably gathered from my comments under your question, good design depends on context. There is no good design for "cars" in the abstract.

But we can come up with good designs for "cars for a racing game", or "a system for managing a car factory", or for "displaying the status of various properties of a car (doors open or closed, current speed, fuel level, unfastened seatbelts)."

The design doesn't depend on what objects you're modelling, but on what you want to do with them. And from your description so far, the purpose of the objects is nothing, except to be there. So I suggest a model where the cars are there and nothing else.

The best design is not the one that best describes some physical object, but the one that best allows your application to do what it is supposed to do.

And if all your application is supposed to do is "have a car", then the model becomes pretty simple.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, in theory. But, he actually does have requirements. ;) –  Johann Gerell Nov 5 '10 at 15:55
    
@Johann, FYI, I edited the original post recently. You might not have seen the original post based on which jalf gave the answer. Initially, I didn't explain the problem well and expect the reader to understand the context from the code. –  Jimmy Nov 5 '10 at 16:03
    
@Johann: the original "problem", which I answered, had no requirements, other than "I want to model a car, with certain components, and it should be extensible". –  jalf Nov 5 '10 at 18:52
    
Sorry about that - I didn't realize that the answer and question got out of sync. –  Johann Gerell Nov 5 '10 at 22:36
    
@joh By the way, even as it stands now, I still don't think there are any requirements. What you have is half a design. But there is still no problem we have to solve. You've said what classes you want, and what functions they should have, which is what the design is supposed to do. What the problem is supposed to do is simply telling us what purpose the program should serve. Then the design should come up with the classes, the functions, the names and all those specifics.So given that the problem is still nonexistent, I'd say my (nonexistent) design fits the bill even after the edits. –  jalf Nov 6 '10 at 14:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.