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So, what exactly is a good use case for implementing an interface explicitly?

Is it only so that people using the class don't have to look at all those methods/properties in intellisense?

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7 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

If you implement two interfaces, both with the same method and different implementations, then you have to implement explicitly.

public interface IDoItFast
{
    void Go();
}
public interface IDoItSlow
{
    void Go();
}
public class JustDoIt : IDoItFast, IDoItSlow
{
    void IDoItFast.Go()
    {
    }

    void IDoItSlow.Go()
    {
    }
}
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Yes exactly this is one case that EIMI solves. And other points are covered by "Michael B" answer. –  Int3 ὰ Nov 5 '10 at 4:20
2  
Excellent example. Love the interface/class names! :-) –  Brian Rogers Oct 17 '13 at 0:18
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It's useful to hide the non-preferred member. For instance, if you implement both IComparable<T> and IComparable it is usually nicer to hide the IComparable overload to not give people the impression that you can compare objects of different types. Similarly, some interfaces are not CLS-compliant, like IConvertible, so if you don't explicitly implement the interface, end users of languages that require CLS compliance cannot use your object. (Which would be very disastrous if the BCL implementers did not hide the IConvertible members of the primitives :))

Another interesting note is that normally using such a construct means that struct that explicitly implement an interface can only invoke them by boxing to the interface type. You can get around this by using generic constraints::

void SomeMethod<T>(T obj) where T:IConvertible

Will not box an int when you pass one to it.

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1  
You have a typo in your constraint. To clerify, the code above does work. It needs to be in the initial declaration of the method signature in the Interface. The original post did not specify this. Also, the proper format is "void SomeMehtod<T>(T obj) where T:IConvertible. Note, there is an extra colon between ")" and "where" that should not be there. still, +1 for clever use of generics to avoid expensive boxing. –  Zack Jannsen Sep 4 '12 at 16:31
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Some additional reasons to implement an interface explicitly:

backwards compatibility: In case the 'ICloneable' interface changes, implementing method class members don't have to change their method signatures.

cleaner code: there will be a compiler error if the 'Clone' method is removed from ICloneable, however if you implement the method implicitly you can end up with unused 'orphaned' public methods

strong typing: To illustrate supercat's story with an example, this would be my preferred sample code, implementing ICloneable explicitly allows 'Clone()' to be strongly typed when you call it directly as a MyObject instance member:

public class MyObject : ICloneable
{
  public MyObject Clone()
  {
    // my cloning logic;  
  }

  object ICloneable.Clone()
  {
    return this.Clone();
  }
}
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For that one, I'd I'd prefer interface ICloneable<out T> { T Clone(); T self {get;} }. Note that there is deliberately no ICloneable<T> constraint on T. While an object can generally only be safely cloned if its base can be, one may wish to derive from a base class which could be safely cloned an object of a class that can't. To allow for that, I'd recommend against having inheritable classes expose a public clone method. Instead have inheritable classes with a protected cloning method and sealed classes which derive from them and expose public cloning. –  supercat May 14 '13 at 22:37
    
Sure that would be nicer, except there's no covariant version of ICloneable in the BCL, so you'd have to create one right? –  Zidad May 15 '13 at 8:30
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Another useful technique is to have a function's public implementation of a method return a value which is more specific than specified in an interface. For example, an object can implement iCloneable, but still have its publicly-visible Clone method return its own type. Likewise, an iAutomobileFactory might have a Manufacture method which returns an Automobile, but a FordExplorerFactory, which implements iAutomobileFactory, might have its Manufacture method return a FordExplorer (which derives from Automobile). Code which knows that it has a FordExplorerFactory could use FordExplorer-specific properties on an object returned by a FordExplorerFactory without having to typecast, while code which merely knew that it had some type of iAutomobileFactory would simply deal with its return as an Automobile.

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1  
+1... this would be my preferred usage of explicit interface implementations, though a small code sample would probably a bit more clear than this story :) –  Zidad Aug 16 '11 at 17:05
    
added a code sample as a new answer below... –  Zidad Aug 16 '11 at 17:24
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It can keep the public interface cleaner to explicitly implement an interface, i.e. your File class might implement IDisposable explicitly and provide a public method Close() which might make more sense to a consumer than Dispose().

F# only offers explicit interface implementation so you always have to cast to the particular interface to access its functionality, which makes for a very explicit (no pun intended) use of the interface.

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I think that most versions of VB also only supported explicit interface definitions. –  Gabe Nov 5 '10 at 3:47
    
@Gabe - it's more subtle than that for VB - the naming and accessibility of members that implement an interface are separate from indicating that they're part of the implementation. So in VB, and looking at @Iain's answer (current top answer), you could implement IDoItFast and IDoItSlow with public members "GoFast" and "GoSlow", respectively. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 5 '10 at 7:36
    
I don't like your particular example (IMHO, the only things that should hide Dispose are those which will never require cleanup); a better example would be something like an immutable collection's implementation of IList<T>.Add. –  supercat Oct 23 '13 at 19:57
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If you have an internal interface and you don't want to implement the members on your class publicly, you would implement them explicitly. Implicit implementations are required to be public.

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Ok, that explains why the project wouldn't compile with an implicit implementation. –  Paulo Manuel Santos Aug 26 '11 at 15:03
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It's also useful when you have two interfaces with the same member name and signature, but want to change the behavior of it depending how it's used. (I don't recommend writing code like this):

interface Cat
{
    string Name {get;}
}

interface Dog
{
    string Name{get;}
}

public class Animal : Cat, Dog
{
    string Cat.Name
    {
        get
        {
            return "Cat";
        }
    }

    string Dog.Name
    {
        get
        {
            return "Dog";
        }
    }
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Animal animal = new Animal();
    Cat cat = animal; //Note the use of the same instance of Animal. All we are doing is picking which interface implementation we want to use.
    Dog dog = animal;
    Console.WriteLine(cat.Name); //Prints Cat
    Console.WriteLine(dog.Name); //Prints Dog
}
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18  
strangest OO related example I've ever seen: public class Animal : Cat, Dog –  mbx Apr 11 '12 at 13:18
9  
@mbx: If Animal also implemented Parrot, it would be a Polly-morphing animal. –  RenniePet Sep 13 '13 at 23:31
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