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I have three points on the circumference of a circle:

pt A = (A.x, A.y); pt B = (B.x, B.y); pt C = (C.x, C.y);

How do I calculate the center of the circle?

Implementing it in Processing (Java).

I found the answer and implemented a working solution:

 pt circleCenter(pt A, pt B, pt C) {

    float yDelta_a = B.y - A.y;
    float xDelta_a = B.x - A.x;
    float yDelta_b = C.y - B.y;
    float xDelta_b = C.x - B.x;
    pt center = P(0,0);

    float aSlope = yDelta_a/xDelta_a;
    float bSlope = yDelta_b/xDelta_b;  
    center.x = (aSlope*bSlope*(A.y - C.y) + bSlope*(A.x + B.x)
        - aSlope*(B.x+C.x) )/(2* (bSlope-aSlope) );
    center.y = -1*(center.x - (A.x+B.x)/2)/aSlope +  (A.y+B.y)/2;

    return center;
  }
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thanks a ton for posting the answer to your question. –  SpoiledTechie.com Apr 14 '11 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It can be a rather in depth calculation. There is a simple step-by-step here: http://paulbourke.net/geometry/circlesphere/. Once you have the equation of the circle, you can simply put it in a form involving H and K. The point (h,k) will be the center.

(scroll down a little ways at the link to get to the equations)

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This is the page that led me to the answer. I implemented it myself as: –  Russell Strauss Nov 5 '10 at 4:09
    
pt circleCenter(pt A, pt B, pt C) { float yDelta_a = B.y - A.y; float xDelta_a = B.x - A.x; float yDelta_b = C.y - B.y; float xDelta_b = C.x - B.x; pt center = P(0,0); float aSlope = yDelta_a/xDelta_a; float bSlope = yDelta_b/xDelta_b; center.x = (aSlopebSlope*(A.y - C.y) + bSlope*(A.x + B.x) - aSlope*(B.x+C.x) )/(2 (bSlope-aSlope) ); center.y = -1*(center.x - (A.x+B.x)/2)/aSlope + (A.y+B.y)/2; return center; } –  Russell Strauss Nov 5 '10 at 4:10

Here's my Java port, dodging the error condition when the determinant disappears with a very elegant IllegalArgumentException, my approach to coping with the "points are two far apart" or "points lie on a line" conditions. Also, this computes the radius (and copes with exceptional conditions) which your intersecting-slopes approach will not do.

public class CircleThree
{ 
  static final double TOL = 0.0000001;

  public static Circle circleFromPoints(final Point p1, final Point p2, final Point p3)
  {
    final double offset = Math.pow(p2.x,2) + Math.pow(p2.y,2);
    final double bc =   ( Math.pow(p1.x,2) + Math.pow(p1.y,2) - offset )/2.0;
    final double cd =   (offset - Math.pow(p3.x, 2) - Math.pow(p3.y, 2))/2.0;
    final double det =  (p1.x - p2.x) * (p2.y - p3.y) - (p2.x - p3.x)* (p1.y - p2.y); 

    if (Math.abs(det) < TOL) { throw new IllegalArgumentException("Yeah, lazy."); }

    final double idet = 1/det;

    final double centerx =  (bc * (p2.y - p3.y) - cd * (p1.y - p2.y)) * idet;
    final double centery =  (cd * (p1.x - p2.x) - bc * (p2.x - p3.x)) * idet;
    final double radius = 
       Math.sqrt( Math.pow(p2.x - centerx,2) + Math.pow(p2.y-centery,2));

    return new Circle(new Point(centerx,centery),radius);
  }

  static class Circle
  {
    final Point center;
    final double radius;
    public Circle(Point center, double radius)
    {
      this.center = center; this.radius = radius;
    }
    @Override 
    public String toString()
    {
      return new StringBuilder().append("Center= ").append(center).append(", r=").append(radius).toString();
    }
  }

  static class Point
  {
    final double x,y;

    public Point(double x, double y)
    {
      this.x = x; this.y = y;
    }
    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
      return "("+x+","+y+")";
    }

  }

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Point p1 = new Point(0.0,1.0);
    Point p2 = new Point(1.0,0.0);
    Point p3 = new Point(2.0,1.0);
    Circle c = circleFromPoints(p1, p2, p3);
    System.out.println(c);
  }

}

See algorithm from here:

void circle_vvv(circle *c)
{
    c->center.w = 1.0;
    vertex *v1 = (vertex *)c->c.p1;
    vertex *v2 = (vertex *)c->c.p2;
    vertex *v3 = (vertex *)c->c.p3;
    float bx = v1->xw; float by = v1->yw;
    float cx = v2->xw; float cy = v2->yw;
    float dx = v3->xw; float dy = v3->yw;
    float temp = cx*cx+cy*cy;
    float bc = (bx*bx + by*by - temp)/2.0;
    float cd = (temp - dx*dx - dy*dy)/2.0;
    float det = (bx-cx)*(cy-dy)-(cx-dx)*(by-cy);
    if (fabs(det) < 1.0e-6) {
        c->center.xw = c->center.yw = 1.0;
        c->center.w = 0.0;
        c->v1 = *v1;
        c->v2 = *v2;
        c->v3 = *v3;
        return;
        }
    det = 1/det;
    c->center.xw = (bc*(cy-dy)-cd*(by-cy))*det;
    c->center.yw = ((bx-cx)*cd-(cx-dx)*bc)*det;
    cx = c->center.xw; cy = c->center.yw;
    c->radius = sqrt((cx-bx)*(cx-bx)+(cy-by)*(cy-by));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm having trouble seeing which 3 are the original vertices. v1, v2, and v3? –  Russell Strauss Nov 5 '10 at 3:48
    
Yeah, it's not great code; I cribbed it. v1,2,3 are the original vertices. (bx,by), (cx,cy), (dx,dy) are the coords. –  andersoj Nov 5 '10 at 3:53
    
@Russell Strauss: I provided a Java port of this code, which makes the flow much clearer. –  andersoj Nov 5 '10 at 12:56

Good solution, but keep in mind this will fail if aSlope is zero. In that case, use:

center.y = -1 * (center.x - (B.x + C.x) / 2) / bSlope +  (B.y + C.y) / 2;
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I was looking for a similar algorithm when I hovered over this question. Took your code but found that this will not work in cases when where either of the slope is 0 or infinity (can be true when xDelta_a or xDelta_b is 0).

I corrected the algorithm and here is my code. Note: I used objective-c programming language and am just changing the code for point value initialization, so if that is wrong, I am sure programmer working in java can correct it. The logic, however, is the same for all (God bless algorithms!! :))

Works perfectly fine as far as my own functional testing is concerned. Please let me know if logic is wrong at any point.

pt circleCenter(pt A, pt B, pt C) {

float yDelta_a = B.y - A.y;
float xDelta_a = B.x - A.x;
float yDelta_b = C.y - B.y;
float xDelta_b = C.x - B.x;
pt center = P(0,0);

float aSlope = yDelta_a/xDelta_a;
float bSlope = yDelta_b/xDelta_b;

pt AB_Mid = P((A.x+B.x)/2, (A.y+B.y)/2);
pt BC_Mid = P((B.x+C.x)/2, (B.y+C.y)/2);

if(yDelta_a == 0)         //aSlope == 0
{
    center.x = AB_Mid.x;
    if (xDelta_b == 0)         //bSlope == INFINITY
    {
        center.y = BC_Mid.y;
    }
    else
    {
        center.y = BC_Mid.y + (BC_Mid.x-center.x)/bSlope;
    }
}
else if (yDelta_b == 0)               //bSlope == 0
{
    center.x = BC_Mid.x;
    if (xDelta_a == 0)             //aSlope == INFINITY
    {
        center.y = AB_Mid.y;
    }
    else
    {
        center.y = AB_Mid.y + (AB_Mid.x-center.x)/aSlope;
    }
}
else if (xDelta_a == 0)        //aSlope == INFINITY
{
    center.y = AB_Mid.y;
    center.x = bSlope*(BC_Mid.y-center.y) + BC_Mid.x;
}
else if (xDelta_b == 0)        //bSlope == INFINITY
{
    center.y = BC_Mid.y;
    center.x = aSlope*(AB_Mid.y-center.y) + AB_Mid.x;
}
else
{
    center.x = (aSlope*bSlope*(AB_Mid.y-BC_Mid.y) - aSlope*BC_Mid.x + bSlope*AB_Mid.x)/(bSlope-aSlope);
    center.y = AB_Mid.y - (center.x - AB_Mid.x)/aSlope;
}

return center;
}
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