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I am starting to learn C++ and Qt, but sometimes the simplest code that I paste from a book results in errors.

I'm using g++4.4.2 on Ubuntu 10.04 with QtCreator IDE. Is there a difference between the g++ compiler syntax and other compilers? For example when I try to access static members something always goes wrong.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
   public:
      static int x;
      static int getX() {return x;}
};
int main()
{
   int A::x = 100; // error: invalid use of qualified-name 'A::x'
   cout<<A::getX(); // error: : undefined reference to 'A::x'
   return 0;
}

I think it's exactly the same as declared here and here (isn't it?). So what's wrong with the above code?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You've declared the static members fine, but not defined them anywhere.

Basically what you've said "there exists some static member", but never set aside some memory for it, you need:

int A::x = 100;

Somewhere outside the class and not inside main.

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1  
Isn't this a declaration: static int getX(){return x;}? –  sorush-r Nov 5 '10 at 9:11
    
In that context it's declaring and defining getX() at the same time. Without the {return x;} it would be just a declaration. The definition is "the bit that makes it work" which is an implementation or some actual storage. –  Flexo Nov 5 '10 at 9:12

Section [9.4.2]

Static Data Members

The declaration of a static data member in its class definition is not a definition and may be of an incomplete type other than cv-qualified void. The definition for a static data member shall appear in a namespace scope enclosing the member’s class definition. In the definition at namespace scope, the name of the static data member shall be qualified by its class name using the :: operator

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Try:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
   public:
      // This declares it.
      static int x;
      static int getX(){return x;}
};

// Now you need an create the object so
// This must be done in once source file (at file scope level)
int A::x = 100;


int main()
{
   A::x = 200;
   // Note no int here. You can modify it

   cout<<A::getX(); // Should work
   return 0;
}
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Ok. it works. but for template classes, gives this error: too few template-parameter-lists. (I write int SP<int>::free = 100;) –  sorush-r Nov 5 '10 at 11:35
    
@Sorush Rabiee: Sorry I am not psychic. You are going to have to show some code that demonstrates the problem. –  Loki Astari Nov 5 '10 at 15:48

The definition of static member variables must live at file scope, i.e. outside all functions, etc.

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Now you have worked out how to use static class members I will advise you that you should generally use them only in the following circumstances:

  • For use in templates. So in your example you could have GetX() in different classes and in a template somewhere you would use

    template< typename T >
    int func()
    {
        return T::GetX();
    }
    

    although obviously more elaborate. But here your static function being in a class serves a purpose.

  • Where the function needs access to the class, i.e. to private members. You could make it a friend but you may as well make it static. Often the case in callbacks.

The rest of the time you can probably use compilation-unit level functions and variables which has the advantage of taking your members out of the header (particularly if they are private). The less implementation detail you give the better.

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Try this example:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class check
{
        static int a;
    public:
        void change();
} ;
int check::a=10;
void check::change()
{
    a++;
    cout<<a<<"\n";
}

int main()
{

    int i,j;
    check c;
    check b;
    c.change();
    b.change();
    return 0;
}
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