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Does anyone know how the source code is declared for the Func and Action pointers? I'm trying to understand the theory behind making an asynchronous call using delegates and how that is tied to threading.

For example, if I have the code below:

    static void Main()
{
  Func<string, int> method = Work;
  IAsyncResult cookie = method.BeginInvoke ("test", null, null);
  //
  // ... here's where we can do other work in parallel...
  //
  int result = method.EndInvoke (cookie);
  Console.WriteLine ("String length is: " + result);
}

static int Work (string s) { return s.Length; }

How would I use the 'delegate' type to replace the Func<> structure; the reason I'd like to figure it out is because Func can only take an input and a return variable. It doesn't allow for design flexibility in the method that it's pointing to.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Func<int, string> is just a generic delegate. It just helps you avoid writing common delegates. That's it. If it doesn't fit for you should write your own delagate. the delagate to replace the one you are asking is

delegate string Method(int parm);

if you want a func(for istance) that takes 22 :-) integer and return a string you have to write you own delegate

delegate string CrazyMethod(int parm1,int parm2,.....)

In your case

 delegate int MyOwnDeletage(string d);
    class Program
    {

        static int Work(string s) { return s.Length; }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            //  Func<string, int> method = Work; 
            MyOwnDeletage method =Work;

              IAsyncResult cookie = method.BeginInvoke ("test", null, null); 
              // 
              // ... here's where we can do other work in parallel... 
              // 
              int result = method.EndInvoke (cookie); 
              Console.WriteLine ("String length is: " + result); 
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
how would i replace this instantiation in the code above so that I can call the beginInvoke() method and point it to the Work() method? – locoboy Nov 5 '10 at 10:43
    
Have a look at my post I have edited it. I can answer here just because I have to post the code – Massimiliano Peluso Nov 5 '10 at 13:26
    
Thanks, this is the answer I was looking for – locoboy Nov 6 '10 at 10:58

Func<T> is nothing special, really. It's simply:

public delegate T Func<T>();

In fact, to support different number of arguments, there are a bunch of them declared, like:

public delegate void Action();
public delegate void Action<T>(T arg);
public delegate U Func<T, U>(T arg);
// so on...
share|improve this answer
    
Small point - the OP is using: delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T arg); – Tim Robinson Nov 5 '10 at 10:18
    
sorry i'm a bit lost. Would you be able to give me a little bit more information in the declaration? Maybe it would be clearer if you could help me in the code when I say "Func<string, int> method = Work;". How exactly could I replace that segment using the 'delegate' keyword? – locoboy Nov 5 '10 at 10:39
    
@cfarm54: I may have understood your question incorrectly. If you want to know the syntax for defining anonymous methods, it'll be: Func<string, int> method = delegate(string s) { return s.Length; };. You can, of course, use lambda syntax and be more concise: Func<string, int> method = s => s.Length;. It's important to point out that anonymous methods are by no means restricted to Func and Action delegates. They can work with any delegate type that matches their signature. – Mehrdad Afshari Nov 5 '10 at 23:25

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