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Say I have something like this:

obj match {
    case objTypeOne : TypeOne => Some(objTypeOne)
    case objTypeTwo : TypeTwo => Some(objTypeTwo)
    case _ => None
}

Now I want to generalise, to pass in one of the types to match:

obj match {
    case objTypeOne : clazz => Some(objTypeOne)
    case objTypeTwo : TypeTwo => Some(objTypeTwo)
    case _ => None
}

But this isn't allowed, I think for syntactic rather than semantic reasons (although I guess also that even though the clazz is a Class[C] the type is erased and so the type of the Option will be lost).

I ended up with:

if(clazzOne.isAssignableFrom(obj.getClass)) Some(clazz.cast(obj))
if(obj.isInstanceOf[TypeTwo]) Some(obj.asInstanceOf[TypeTwo])
None

I just wondered if there was a nicer way.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use pattern guards to achieve that. Try something like this:

obj match {
    case objTypeTwo : TypeTwo => Some(objTypeTwo)
    case objTypeOne if clazz.isAssignableFrom(objTypeOne.getClass) => Some(clazz.cast(objTypeOne))
    case _ => None
}
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You could define an extractor to match your object:

class IsClass[T: Manifest] {
  def unapply(any: Any): Option[T] = {
    if (implicitly[Manifest[T]].erasure.isInstance(any)) {
       Some(any.asInstanceOf[T])
    } else {
       None
    }
  }
}

So let's test it:

class Base { def baseMethod = () }
class Derived extends Base

val IsBase = new IsClass[Base]

def test(a:Any) = a match {
    case IsBase(b) => 
      println("base")
      b.baseMethod
    case _ => println("?")
  }

test(new Base)
test(1)

You will have to define a val for your extractor, you can't inline IsBase, for example. Otherwise it would be interpreted as an extractor.

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You can use a local type alias for that:

def matcher[T](obj: Any)(implicit man: Manifest[T]) = {
   val instance = man.erasure.newInstance.asInstanceOf[AnyRef]
   type T = instance.type // type alias
   obj match { 
      case objTypeOne : T => "a"
      case objTypeTwo : TypeTwo => "b"
      case _ => "c"
   }
}

scala> matcher[TypeOne](TypeOne())
res108: java.lang.String = a

scala> matcher[TypeTwo](TypeOne())
res109: java.lang.String = c

UPDATE: Aaron Novstrup has pointed out that singleton type will only work if man.erasure.newInstance==obj (see §3.2.1 of the spec)

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This looks great, but I can't work out how to pass the type alias in as a parameter. I'm trying to find something of a certain Class, passing in the Class (currently a Class[C]) and I have different methods that look for different classes. –  Dan Gravell Nov 5 '10 at 14:24
1  
I don't think this is what @Dan intended. In order for obj2 to be of type obj1.type, it must be equal to obj1. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 5 '10 at 16:09
    
No. obj1 is just an instance of the same type as obj2 - objects shouldn't be equal. –  Vasil Remeniuk Nov 5 '10 at 16:17
1  
@Vasil 1) This code assumes that T has a no-arg constructor. 2) It doesn't compile in the Scala 2.8.0 REPL. 3) It won't work if obj != man.erasure.newInstance. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 5 '10 at 18:12
1  
The reason is found in §3.2.1 of the spec: "A singleton type [...] p.type [...] denotes the set of values consisting of null and the value denoted by p". –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 5 '10 at 19:28

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