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I need some sort of way to store key/value pairs where the value can be of different types.

So I like to do:

 int i = 12;
 string s = "test";
 double x = 24.1;

 Storage.Add("age", i);
 Storage.Add("name", s);
 Storage.Add("bmi", x);

And later retrieve the values with:

 int a = Storage.Get("age");
 string b = Storage.Get("name");
 double c = Storage.Get("bmi");

How should a Storage like this look like? Thanks, Erik

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7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Well, you could use Dictionary<string, dynamic> in C# 4 / .NET 4 - but other than that, you can't do it with exactly the code shown because there's no type which is implicitly convertible to int, string and double. (You could write your own one, but you'd have to list each type separately.)

You could use Dictionary<string, object> but then you'd need to cast the results:

int a = (int) Storage.Get("age");
string b = (string) Storage.Get("name");
double c = (double) Storage.Get("bmi");

Alternatively, you could make the Get method generic:

int a = Storage.Get<int>("age");
// etc
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Perhaps someone should create a Variant type? HELP, I'M BLIND! –  Lasse V. Karlsen Nov 5 '10 at 11:55
1  
I agree with Jon Skeet. Again. But doing something like this means you are doing something wrong. You should first think about reasons behind why you need to store different values in single dictionary. –  Euphoric Nov 5 '10 at 11:58
    
Thanks a lot, the generic Get method was the thing I was looking for!! –  Enrico Nov 5 '10 at 12:20
    
Agree wtih Euphoric, would that be easier if just change the dictionary to an Object, and each of value in the list can be a member. Even though it is less dynamic(say you have a large number of uncertain values in the list), it is type safe and easier to maintain. –  anIBMer Dec 9 '13 at 0:58

You could declare a Dictionary containing just the type object and then cast your results; .e.g.

        Dictionary<string, object> storage = new Dictionary<string,object>();

        storage.Add("age", 12);
        storage.Add("name", "test");
        storage.Add("bmi", 24.1);

        int a = (int)storage["age"];
        string b = (string)storage["name"];
        double c = (double)storage["bmi"];

However, this isn't that elegant. If you know you are always going to be storing age, name, bmi I would create an object to encapsulate those and store that instead. E.g.

    public class PersonInfo
    {
        public int Age { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public double Bmi { get; set; }
    }

And then use that insead of the Dictionary... e.g.

        PersonInfo person1 = new PersonInfo { Name = "test", Age = 32, Bmi = 25.01 };

        int age = person1.Age;

etc.

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Why not use:

Dictionary<string, object>

You can create an extension method to cast them when you get them:

public static class DictionaryExcetions
{
    public static T Get<T>(this Dictionary<string, object> instance, string name)
    {
        return (T)instance[name];
    }

}

var age = dictionary.Get<int>("age");
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Dictionary<string, object>
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You can use a Dictionary<string,object> and then you can put anything you want into it. You would have to cast the results to the right type when you get them out though.

Looking at your example though you might want to consider whether a simple class to store the data might be more what you want and allow better type safety. It depends on whether you have a limited set of things to put in the class or if you do need the potentially unlimited/unknown storage of a dictionary.

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Given that you don't want a strongly typed data collection then I would have thought a HashTable would be suitable for your situation. You could create an Extention method for this also, like another poster suggested for the Dictionary implementation.

E.g.

public static class StorageExtentions
    {
        public static T Get<T>(this Hashtable table, object key)
        {
            return (T) table[key];
        }
    }

Your code would then look like:

        int i = 12;
        string s = "test";
        double x = 24.1;
        Hashtable Storage = new Hashtable();
        Storage.Add("age", i);
        Storage.Add("name", s);
        Storage.Add("bmi", x);
        int a = Storage.Get<int>("age");
        string b = Storage.Get<string>("name");
        double c = Storage.Get<double>("bmi");
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Dictionary is clearly the quickest solution.

Another way could be to store a custom class in which you could store the actual value and the information regarding its type

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