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Just reading the msdn article on overriding equality operators here

The following snippet confuses me...

// If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint;
if ((System.Object)p == null) // <-- wtf?
{
    return false;
}

Why is there a cast to Object here to perform the null comparison?

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1  
What is TwoDPoint? Maybe its a value type :-D –  Grzenio Nov 5 '10 at 12:07
    
nope. Check the link... –  jgauffin Nov 5 '10 at 12:09
    
They have a better guideline for Visual Studio 2012. They haven't put the link in the 2005 article, so I put it here: How to: Define Value Equality for a Type (C# Programming Guide). –  Brk Jul 31 '13 at 6:54
    
This must be the first time I got an answer, in the question! I solved my stack overflow problem thanks to this :] –  ppumkin May 9 at 9:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Operators apply through static analysis (and overloads), not virtual methods (overrides). With the cast, it is doing a reference equality check. Without the cast, it can run the TwoDPoint operator. I guess this is to avoid problems when an operator is added.

Personally, though, I'd do a reference check explicitly with ReferenceEquals.

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+1 … this style is obviously horribly confusing (this question has come up numerous times). ReferenceEquals exists, it should be used. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 5 '10 at 13:11
    
The MSDN article then goes on to explain why ReferenceEquals should be used :) –  Hans Passant Nov 5 '10 at 14:28
    
You will get a stackoverflow , like I did, when you compare your object to null a == null, it will rerun your overridden == or != over and over, until it crashes. –  ppumkin May 9 at 9:38
    
@ppumkin however, in the code shown/linked, there is no == operator, hence my comment "when an operator is added". –  Marc Gravell May 9 at 11:17

No! if you don't do that, the runtime will start a recursive call to the equality operator you are just in which results in infinite recursion and, consequently, a stack overflow.

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1  
Nope. It will not. Try the code.. –  jgauffin Nov 5 '10 at 12:23
    
Yes, without the cast it will recurse until StackOverflow –  ppumkin May 9 at 9:41

To force it to use the Equals method of Object rather than its own overloaded version... just a guess...

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Yes, but why? –  jgauffin Nov 5 '10 at 12:25

This is not useless. Without that cast the == operator being overloaded would be called recursively...

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Nope. I just tried the code without the cast. –  jgauffin Nov 5 '10 at 12:13
    
@jgauffin: I had assumed that the code was overloading the == operator, instead it's overloading Equals. In this case I see no reason to do that, apart avoiding errors if the == operator is introduced later as @Marc Gravell suggests. –  Paolo Tedesco Nov 5 '10 at 12:15
    
The point of the article is that you can't override Equals AND overload == without using a cast to Object. If you do, you get a NullReferenceException when you try to do (myVariable == null). But I agree about the use of ReferenceEquals. –  tandrewnichols Jan 9 '13 at 13:06

the below is the line that does the cast

TwoDPoint p = obj as TwoDPoint

the difference with the "normal" cast is that using "As" it doesn't raise an exception if the object is not "castable". In this case if "p" is not a TwoDPoint Type is not gonna raise an exception (cast not valid) but return null.

if ((System.Object)p == null) // <-- wtf? 
{ 
    return false; 
} 

this code check if the cast went fine if not p should be null for the reason above

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1  
He asked why the (System.Object) cast is there, nothing else. –  jgauffin Nov 5 '10 at 12:24
    
you are right I just misunderstood the question :-) –  Massimiliano Peluso Nov 5 '10 at 17:16

Note that this is the VS 2005 documentation. I guess the folks who write the documentation also had the same question and couldn't come up with a good answer; the example was changed for VS 2008. Here is the current version:

public bool Equals(TwoDPoint p)
{
    // If parameter is null, return false.
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(p, null))
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Optimization for a common success case.
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this, p))
    {
        return true;
    }

    // If run-time types are not exactly the same, return false.
    if (this.GetType() != p.GetType())
        return false;

    // Return true if the fields match.
    // Note that the base class is not invoked because it is
    // System.Object, which defines Equals as reference equality.
    return (X == p.X) && (Y == p.Y);
}
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