Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I happen to come across the following function pointer.

char (*(*x())[])();

It looks like an array of function pointer in the following format, but I can't see what f -> (*x()) means. How to interpret this messy function pointer?

char (*f[])();

ADDED

With John Bode's help, I make an example as follows.

#include <stdio.h>

char foo()    { return 'a'; }
char bar()    { return 'b'; }
char blurga() { return 'c'; }
char bletch() { return 'd'; }

char (*gfunclist[])() = {foo, bar, blurga, bletch};

char (*(*x())[])()
{
  static char (*funclist[4])() = {foo, bar, blurga, bletch};
  return &funclist;
}

int main() 
{
  printf("%c\n",gfunclist[0]());

  char (*(*fs)[4])();
  fs = x();
  printf("%c\n",(*fs)[1]()); 
}

I could get the expected result.

smcho@prosseek temp2> ./a.out 
a
b

And, you can find a better implementation here.

share|improve this question
1  
Kernighan and Ritchie ought to be prosecuted for allowing syntax like this ;) –  500 - Internal Server Error Nov 5 '10 at 16:19
    
What are you talking about? That code is perfectly transparent and understandable. :p –  John Bode Nov 5 '10 at 17:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

My general procedure is to find the leftmost identifier in the declaration, and then work my way out, remembering that [] and () bind before * (i.e., *f() is normally parsed as *(f()) and *a[] is normally parsed as *(a[])).

So,

          x           -- x
          x()         -- is a function
         *x()         -- returning a pointer
        (*x())[]      -- to an array
       *(*x())[]      -- of pointers
      (*(*x())[])()   -- to functions
 char (*(*x())[])();  -- returning char

What would such a beast look like in practice?

char foo()    { return 'a'; }
char bar()    { return 'b'; }
char blurga() { return 'c'; }
char bletch() { return 'd'; }

/**  
 *           funclist           -- funclist
 *           funclist[]         -- is an array
 *          *funclist[]         -- of pointers
 *         (*funclist[])()      -- to functions
 *    char (*funclist[])()      -- returning char
 */    
char (*funclist[])() = {foo, bar, blurga, bletch};

The expression &funclist will return a pointer to the array, so

char (*(*x())[])()
{
  return &funclist;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "teaching to fish" (your detailed explanation), as opposed to handing the original asker a basket of fish ("go to cdecl.org") –  Dan Nov 6 '10 at 6:56
char (*(*x())[])();

x is a function returning pointer to array of pointer to function returning char

char (*f[])();

In this case f is an array of pointer to function returning char

Using the right-left rule would be beneficial.

share|improve this answer
    
really? padding... –  frast Nov 5 '10 at 13:48
    
Could you please, for clarity and understandability, tell us how you decipher that so quickly? With bold or italics, step by step? Thanks :) –  Benoit Nov 5 '10 at 13:49
    
@Benoit : Check out the link that I have given in my post. –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 5 '10 at 13:52
1  
Thank you very much, @Prasoon Saurav –  Benoit Nov 5 '10 at 13:53
cdecl> explain char (*(*x())[])();
declare x as function returning pointer to array of pointer to function returning char
share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome website, thx for the tip. –  Let_Me_Be Nov 5 '10 at 13:51

A few typedefs make it clearer:

typedef char (*charfunc_t)();

This defines charfunc_t to be a pointer to a function without arguments that returns char.

typedef charfunc_t funcarr_t[];

funcarr_t is an array of such function pointers.

x is a function returning a pointer to such an array and it can now be declared like this:

funcarr_t* x();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yes, the use of typedef is definitely clearer. –  Stephane Rolland Nov 5 '10 at 15:57

Visit this site to help you understand c declarations (cdecl.org), if you type the above in, it will tell you this

declare x as function returning pointer to array of pointer to function returning char

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.