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Is it possible to validate a collection of objects in JSR 303 - Jave Bean Validation where the collection itself does not have any annotations but the elements contained within do?

For example, is it possible for this to result in a constraint violation due to a null name on the second person:

List<Person> people = new ArrayList<Person>();
people.add(new Person("dave"));
people.add(new Person(null));

Validator validator = Validation.buildDefaultValidatorFactory().getValidator();
Set<ConstraintViolation<List<Person>>> validation = validator.validate(people);
share|improve this question
up vote 38 down vote accepted

Yes, just add @Valid to the collection.

Here is an example from the Hibernate Validator Reference.

public class Car {
  @NotNull
  @Valid
  private List<Person> passengers = new ArrayList<Person>();
}

This is standard JSR-303 behavior. See Section 3.1.3 of the spec.

share|improve this answer
    
ok great, much better! – cam Sep 14 '12 at 21:04

You, can also add @NotEmpty to the collection.

public class Car {
  @NotEmpty(message="At least one passenger is required")
  @Valid
  private List<Person> passengers = new ArrayList<Person>();
}

this will ensure at least one passenger is present, and the @Valid annotation ensures that each Person object is validated

share|improve this answer

You can of course also just iterate over the list and call Validator.validate on each element. Or put the List into some wrapper bean and annotate it with @Valid. Extending ArrayList for validation seems wrong to me. Do you have a particular use case you want to solve with this? If so maybe you can explain it a little more. To answer your initial question:

Is it possible to validate a collection of objects in JSR 303 - Jave Bean Validation where the collection itself does not have any annotations but the elements contained within do?

No

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using JAX-RS and have a json list of objects which i parse into a list of java beans. I don't have a wrapper object for the list, so no property to annotate... i thought that if this was going to be a general problem in not having a wrapping bean, instead of creating a new wrapper for each type of list it might be easier just to annotate a generic list subclass. I think this would also be achievable though with a generic wrapping bean as you suggest, eg: public class ValidatableListBean<T extends List<?>> { @Valid private T list; } – cam Nov 9 '10 at 10:23
    
Actually, maybe that class would look more like this: public class ValidatableBeanList<T> { @Valid private List<T> list; } – cam Nov 9 '10 at 10:29
    
ValidatableBeanList<T> seems reasonable for your usecase. – Hardy Nov 10 '10 at 9:04

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