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I have a collection:

List<VPair<Item, List<Item>> dependencyHierarchy;

The first item in pair is some object (item) and the second one is a collection of the same type objects that the first one depends on. I want to get a List<Item> in order of dependency, so there are not items that depend on the first element and so on (no cycled dependency!).

Input:

Item4 depends on Item3 and Item5
Item3 depends on Item1
Item1 does not depend on any one
Item2 depends on Item4 
Item5 does not depend on any one 

Result:

Item1
Item5
Item3
Item4
Item2

Thank you.

SOLUTION:

Topological Sorting (thanks to Loïc Février for idea)

and

example on C#, example on Java (thanks to xcud for great examples)

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8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Perfect example to use a topological sort :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topological_sorting

It will give you exactly what you need.

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9  
Found a C# impl of tsort: tawani.blogspot.com/2009/02/topological-sorting-and-cyclic.html –  xcud Nov 5 '10 at 15:13
    
Thanks man, just what I needed. –  garik Nov 5 '10 at 15:37
    
@xcud great sample! –  garik Nov 5 '10 at 15:37

Having struggled with this for a while, here's my attempt at a Linq style TSort extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> TSort<T>( this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> dependencies, bool throwOnCycle = false )
{
    var sorted = new List<T>();
    var visited = new HashSet<T>();

    foreach( var item in source )
        Visit( item, visited, sorted, dependencies, throwOnCycle );

    return sorted;
}

private static void Visit<T>( T item, HashSet<T> visited, List<T> sorted, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> dependencies, bool throwOnCycle )
{
    if( !visited.Contains( item ) )
    {
        visited.Add( item );

        foreach( var dep in dependencies( item ) )
            Visit( dep, visited, sorted, dependencies, throwOnCycle );

        sorted.Add( item );
    }
    else
    {
        if( throwOnCycle )
            throw new Exception( "Cyclic dependency found" );
    }
}
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3  
+1 Much simpler and seems to work for me. The only change I made was to use a Dictionary<T, object> instead of List<T> for visited - it should be faster for large collections. –  E M Sep 11 '12 at 6:37
    
Thanks E M - I've updated to use a HashSet for the visited collection. –  DMM Sep 13 '12 at 21:04
1  
+1 I had a look at the pseudo code for the algorithm on Wikipedia and thought it would be easy enough to implement, but having the actual implementation is even easier! –  ta.speot.is Nov 15 '12 at 1:47
12  
Thanks DMM! That works for me with one modification : At the end of the if( !visited.Contains( item ) ), I added something like (in Java) else if(!sorted.contains(item)){throw new Exception("Invalid dependency cycle!");} to manage the case where A->B, B->C and C->A. –  electrotype Dec 26 '12 at 15:15
2  
Adding an example how to use the code would be great. –  Dilshod Tadjibaev Sep 4 '13 at 20:32

There's a nuget for that.

For those of us who prefer not to re-invent the wheel: use nuget to install the QuickGraph .NET library, which includes multiple graph algorithms including topological sort.

To use it, you need to create an instance of AdjacencyGraph<,> such as AdjacencyGraph<String, SEdge<String>>. Then, if you include the appropriate extensions:

using QuickGraph.Algorithms;

You can call:

var sorted = myGraph.TopologicalSort();

To get a list of sorted nodes.

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This is my own re-implementation of Topological sorting, the idea is based on http://tawani.blogspot.com/2009/02/topological-sorting-and-cyclic.html (The ported Java source code consumes too much memory, checking 50k objects costs 50k*50k*4 = 10GB which is unacceptable. In addition, it still has Java coding convention some places)

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace Modules
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Provides fast-algorithm and low-memory usage to sort objects based on their dependencies. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Definition: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topological_sorting
    /// Source code credited to: http://tawani.blogspot.com/2009/02/topological-sorting-and-cyclic.html    
    /// Original Java source code: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Collections-Data-Structure/Topologicalsorting.htm
    /// </remarks>
    /// <author>ThangTran</author>
    /// <history>
    /// 2012.03.21 - ThangTran: rewritten based on <see cref="TopologicalSorter"/>.
    /// </history>
    public class DependencySorter<T>
    {
        //**************************************************
        //
        // Private members
        //
        //**************************************************

        #region Private members

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the dependency matrix used by this instance.
        /// </summary>
        private readonly Dictionary<T, Dictionary<T, object>> _matrix = new Dictionary<T, Dictionary<T, object>>();

        #endregion


        //**************************************************
        //
        // Public methods
        //
        //**************************************************

        #region Public methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Adds a list of objects that will be sorted.
        /// </summary>
        public void AddObjects(params T[] objects)
        {
            // --- Begin parameters checking code -----------------------------
            Debug.Assert(objects != null);
            Debug.Assert(objects.Length > 0);
            // --- End parameters checking code -------------------------------

            // add to matrix
            foreach (T obj in objects)
            {
                // add to dictionary
                _matrix.Add(obj, new Dictionary<T, object>());
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sets dependencies of given object.
        /// This means <paramref name="obj"/> depends on these <paramref name="dependsOnObjects"/> to run.
        /// Please make sure objects given in the <paramref name="obj"/> and <paramref name="dependsOnObjects"/> are added first.
        /// </summary>
        public void SetDependencies(T obj, params T[] dependsOnObjects)
        {
            // --- Begin parameters checking code -----------------------------
            Debug.Assert(dependsOnObjects != null);
            // --- End parameters checking code -------------------------------

            // set dependencies
            Dictionary<T, object> dependencies = _matrix[obj];
            dependencies.Clear();

            // for each depended objects, add to dependencies
            foreach (T dependsOnObject in dependsOnObjects)
            {
                dependencies.Add(dependsOnObject, null);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Sorts objects based on this dependencies.
        /// Note: because of the nature of algorithm and memory usage efficiency, this method can be used only one time.
        /// </summary>
        public T[] Sort()
        {
            // prepare result
            List<T> result = new List<T>(_matrix.Count);

            // while there are still object to get
            while (_matrix.Count > 0)
            {
                // get an independent object
                T independentObject;
                if (!this.GetIndependentObject(out independentObject))
                {
                    // circular dependency found
                    throw new CircularReferenceException();
                }

                // add to result
                result.Add(independentObject);

                // delete processed object
                this.DeleteObject(independentObject);
            }

            // return result
            return result.ToArray();
        }

        #endregion


        //**************************************************
        //
        // Private methods
        //
        //**************************************************

        #region Private methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns independent object or returns NULL if no independent object is found.
        /// </summary>
        private bool GetIndependentObject(out T result)
        {
            // for each object
            foreach (KeyValuePair<T, Dictionary<T, object>> pair in _matrix)
            {
                // if the object contains any dependency
                if (pair.Value.Count > 0)
                {
                    // has dependency, skip it
                    continue;
                }

                // found
                result = pair.Key;
                return true;
            }

            // not found
            result = default(T);
            return false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Deletes given object from the matrix.
        /// </summary>
        private void DeleteObject(T obj)
        {
            // delete object from matrix
            _matrix.Remove(obj);

            // for each object, remove the dependency reference
            foreach (KeyValuePair<T, Dictionary<T, object>> pair in _matrix)
            {
                // if current object depends on deleting object
                pair.Value.Remove(obj);
            }
        }


        #endregion
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Represents a circular reference exception when sorting dependency objects.
    /// </summary>
    public class CircularReferenceException : Exception
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="CircularReferenceException"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        public CircularReferenceException()
            : base("Circular reference found.")
        {            
        }
    }
}
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I liked DMM's answer, but it assumes that the input nodes are leaves (which may or may not be what is expected).

I am posting an alternate solution using LINQ that does not make this assumption. In addition, this solution uses yield return to be able to quickly return the leaves (using e.g. TakeWhile).

public static IEnumerable<T> TopologicalSort<T>(this IEnumerable<T> nodes, 
                                                Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> connected)
{
    var elems = nodes.ToDictionary(node => node, 
                                   node => new HashSet<T>(connected(node)));
    while (elems.Count > 0)
    {
        var elem = elems.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Value.Count == 0);
        if (elem.Key == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Cyclic connections are not allowed");
        }
        elems.Remove(elem.Key);
        foreach (var selem in elems)
        {
            selem.Value.Remove(elem.Key);
        }
        yield return elem.Key;
    }
}
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A different idea, for cases with only one "parent" depending:

Instead of deps, you'd store the parents.
So you can tell very easily whether an issue is a dependency of some other.
And then use Comparable<T>, which would claim the dependencies "lesser" and the dependency "greater".
And then simply call Collections.sort( List<T>, ParentComparator<T>);

For multi-parent scenario, a tree search would be needed which would result in slow execution. But that could be solved by a cache in a form of A* sort matrix.

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I would make this easier on myself by storing the dependencies of an Item within the Item itself:

public class Item
{
    private List<Item> m_Dependencies = new List<Item>();

    protected AddDependency(Item _item) { m_Dependencies.Add(_item); }

    public Item()
    {
    }; // eo ctor

    public List<Item> Dependencies {get{return(m_Dependencies);};}
} // eo class Item

Then, given this you can implement a custom Sort delegate for List that sorts based on whether the given Item is contained within the other's list of dependencies:

int CompareItem(Item _1, Item _2)
{
    if(_2.Dependencies.Contains(_1))
        return(-1);
    else if(_1.Dependencies.Contains(_2))
        return(1);
    else
        return(0);
}
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2  
The order is not complete so it won't work. You would need to have for each item the list of all items he or any of his descendants depends on. (ie build the complete directed acyclic graph) Easy to find a counter-example : 1 depends of 3 and 2, 3 of 4. [3 4 1 2] is sorted according to your algorithm. But 3 must be after 1. –  Loïc Février Nov 5 '10 at 14:49
    
ah, thankyou. I didn't think of that. Much appreciated. Here come the downvotes! :) –  Moo-Juice Nov 5 '10 at 14:53
    
Loic, would you be so kind as to explain further why my suggestion doesn't work? Not trying to say it's right, but just so I can learn better. I just tried it here and both for the OP's example and your example, my resulting list was in order. By luck, perhaps? :) Given your example (1 depending on 3 & 2, 2 depending on 4), my resulting sort was [4, 3, 2, 1] –  Moo-Juice Nov 5 '10 at 15:12
1  
To order a list every sorting algorithm will only check if any consecutive elements are sorted. In your case sorted means : the second one does not depend of the first one. [3 4 1 2] and [4, 3, 2, 1] are two possible orders. The algorithm suppose transitivity : if x <= y and y <= z then x <= z. In this case it's not true. You can however modify the data : if x depends of y and y depends of z then add z to x' dependency list. Your partial order is now a complete partial order and a sorting algorithm can work. But the complexity to "complete it" is O(N^2) where as is' O(N) for topological sort. –  Loïc Février Nov 5 '10 at 15:29
1  
Moo-Juice, thank you for attempt! –  garik Nov 5 '10 at 15:50

I merged DMM's idea with the depth-first-search algorithm on Wikipedia. It works perfect for what I needed.

public static class TopologicalSorter
{
public static List<string> LastCyclicOrder = new List<string>(); //used to see what caused the cycle

sealed class ItemTag
{
  public enum SortTag
  {
    NotMarked,
    TempMarked,
    Marked
  }

  public string Item { get; set; }
  public SortTag Tag { get; set; }

  public ItemTag(string item)
  {
    Item = item;
    Tag = SortTag.NotMarked;
  }
}

public static IEnumerable<string> TSort(this IEnumerable<string> source, Func<string, IEnumerable<string>> dependencies)
{
  TopologicalSorter.LastCyclicOrder.Clear();

  List<ItemTag> allNodes = new List<ItemTag>();
  HashSet<string> sorted = new HashSet<string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

  foreach (string item in source)
  {
    if (!allNodes.Where(n => string.Equals(n.Item, item, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)).Any())
    {
      allNodes.Add(new ItemTag(item)); //don't insert duplicates
    }
    foreach (string dep in dependencies(item))
    {
      if (allNodes.Where(n => string.Equals(n.Item, dep, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)).Any()) continue; //don't insert duplicates
      allNodes.Add(new ItemTag(dep));
    }
  }

  foreach (ItemTag tag in allNodes)
  {
    Visit(tag, allNodes, dependencies, sorted);
  }

  return sorted;
}

static void Visit(ItemTag tag, List<ItemTag> allNodes, Func<string, IEnumerable<string>> dependencies, HashSet<string> sorted)
{
  if (tag.Tag == ItemTag.SortTag.TempMarked)
  {
    throw new GraphIsCyclicException();
  }
  else if (tag.Tag == ItemTag.SortTag.NotMarked)
  {
    tag.Tag = ItemTag.SortTag.TempMarked;
    LastCyclicOrder.Add(tag.Item);

    foreach (ItemTag dep in dependencies(tag.Item).Select(s => allNodes.Where(t => string.Equals(s, t.Item, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)).First())) //get item tag which falls with used string
      Visit(dep, allNodes, dependencies, sorted);

    LastCyclicOrder.Remove(tag.Item);
    tag.Tag = ItemTag.SortTag.Marked;
    sorted.Add(tag.Item);
  }
}
}
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