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Possible Duplicate:
Finding the type of an object in C++

Hello,
I am sorry if it's a duplicate but I was not able to find answer to my question here.
Let's assume we have following class structure in c++:

class CPolygon {
  protected:
    int width, height;
  public:
    void set_values (int a, int b)
      { width=a; height=b; }
  };

class CRectangle: public CPolygon {
  public:
    int area ()
      { return (width * height); }
  };

Now I have got a pointer to CPolygon object. How do I check if it's actually a pointer to the object of class CRectangle?

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marked as duplicate by Björn Pollex, Michael Mrozek, Joe Gauterin, bmargulies, Graviton Nov 7 '10 at 7:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
As a side not you should consider not doing that. If you think you need to do it, there is probably something wrong with your design. – Björn Pollex Nov 5 '10 at 15:05
3  
That's not how polymorphism works. Polymorphism means removing the need to check this. – delnan Nov 5 '10 at 15:08
5  
There ARE valid reasons to want to know the concrete type of a polymorphic class; that said, they're few and far between. It's good to know how to check the concrete type; it's also good to know that having to do that is usually a bad sign. – Paul Sonier Nov 5 '10 at 15:11
3  
@Armen: I don't fully agree about the personal bit, as long as you disclose the code it's not personal any longer. Someone will probably inherit from this mess one day or another. – Matthieu M. Nov 5 '10 at 15:15
4  
@Armen: I understand, and I would admit that a one-letter prefix isn't much, but next we'll get class ClassPolygon;, void FunctionAdd(int,int), etc... Also, do you prefix struct with C or S ? And what if someone changes the kind but not the prefix ? It may feel personal, but redundancy leads to inconsistency. – Matthieu M. Nov 5 '10 at 15:28
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can do this by checking if dynamic_cast<CRectangle*>(ptr) return non-null, where ptr is a pointer to CPolygon. However this requires the base class (CPolygon) to have at least one virtual member function which you probably need anyway (at least a virtual destructor).

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Ideally, you don't. You use polymorphism to just do the right thing:

class CPolygon {
  protected:
    int width, height;
  public:
    void set_values (int a, int b)
      { width=a; height=b; }

    virtual int area() const = 0;
  };

class CRectangle: public CPolygon {
  public:
    int area () const
      { return (width * height); }
  };

Call area() on your CPolygon pointer, and you'll get the area for a CRectangle if that's what it is. Everything derived from CPolygon will have to implement area() or you won't be able to instantiate it.

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6  
That's not what the OP asked, and while it's easy to say "just don't do that", there ARE valid reasons for wanting to get the concrete type of a class. – Paul Sonier Nov 5 '10 at 15:13
    
@McWafflestix: but what if I have another sub class with some extra function in it and I want to call those functions? – Amit S Nov 5 '10 at 15:22
    
@AmitS: that's my point; you might want to do something like that. – Paul Sonier Nov 5 '10 at 15:25
    
@McWafflestix: yes, I get your point now, we can just call any damn function in the whole hierarchy, compiler would automatically detect its type and call the required function. But here is more scenario (and this is what I want to do in this case), what if I don't want to call any function. I just want to check if there is indeed an object of type CRectangle? Is it a valid case or this case should not occur in the design? – Amit S Nov 5 '10 at 15:33
1  
@McWafflestix: I am really sorry, I intended to ask these questions to "Fred Larson". I mixed the names. Sorry for the confusion. @Fred Larson: Would you care to answer the validity of the scenario that I mentioned in my previous comment? – Amit S Nov 5 '10 at 15:42

You dynamic_cast it

CRect* pRect = dymanic_cast<CRect*>(MyPolygonPointer);

if(pRect != 0)
{
   //...it is a CRect
}

But naturally downcasting is a bad practice and should be used with caution. In a good design you don't care about the actual dynamic type of the pointer.

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You can perform a dynamic_cast to CRectangle and see if that gives a proper result or not.

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