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I'm working on a planet generation tool in C++ and currently I'm trying to generate textures and heightmaps.

I'm using a 3d perlian noise function for this, so every time I generate a texture or heightmap I will calculate the value of the noise function for every vertex on the surface of the sphere.

These co ordinates do not change. Originally I was calculating these by mapping a cube to a sphere using this method.

I then thought well if I know these values are going to be the same each time, why not calculate them once and output them to a headerfile where they can be defined as static arrays.

I want to create textures 512x512 this means 260,000+ co ordinates are generated per face :(

The resulting co ordinates were stored in an array:

float textureMapSaved[6][512][512][3] = {etc};

As the cube has 6 faces, 512x512 pixels per face and 3 co ordinates (x,y & z).

This would hopefully then allow me to just loop through the array getting the co ordinate for the value in the perlian noise function that I am interested in.

Thus far I have only managed to transform my computer into a blubbering mess.

My question is:

Is there a viable way of doing this?

Without creating the output file the program takes about 15 minutes to compute the sphere. I couldn't actually compile with the header, it crashed my computer.

I then tried 256x256 and this worked a little better but my computer was still chugging; I'm guessing this is because it cannot allocate memory for the 4D array efficiently.


Thanks for the quick replies!

At the moment I am doing the following:

std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<float>>>> textureFaces = GenerateSphereCoordinates(TEXTURE_MAP);

std::ofstream myfile;
myfile.open ("spheremapping.h");
myfile << "#ifndef _SPHEREMAP \n#define _SPHEREMAP \n\nfloat textureMapSaved[6][" << textureRes << "][" << textureRes << "][3] = {";
for(int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
    myfile << "{";
    for(int j = 0; j < textureRes; j++)
    {
        myfile << "{";
        for(int k = 0; k < textureRes; k++)
        {
            if(k != textureRes - 1)
            {
                myfile << "{ " << textureFaces[i][j][k][0] << ", " << textureFaces[i][j][k][1] << ", " << textureFaces[i][j][k][2] << "}, " ;               
            }
            else
            {
                myfile << "{ " << textureFaces[i][j][k][0] << ", " << textureFaces[i][j][k][1] << ", " << textureFaces[i][j][k][2] << "}" ; 
            }
        }
        if(j != textureRes - 1)
        {
            myfile << "}, \n";
        }
        else
        {
            myfile << "} \n";
        }
    }
    if(i != 5)
    {
        myfile << "}, \n\n";
    }
    else
    {
        myfile << "} \n\n";
    }
}
myfile << "};\n\n#endif";
myfile.close();

How do I save it as a binary file and read it directly into memory?

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1  
The array is only about ~16MB in size. As long as it's allocated statically (using static or by placing it at namespace scope) or dynamically (using new) and as long as you don't run out of memory or run out of contiguous chunks large enough to hold it, the allocation itself shouldn't be a bottleneck. –  James McNellis Nov 5 '10 at 15:48
    
If it crashed your computer, you're probably doing something else wrong. Like James says, this isn't really a big array. Post code. –  Steve M Nov 5 '10 at 15:50
    
So, have you generated the header file yet or not? Or is it taking 15 minutes just to compute the texture map? If it's taking so long and you've already generated and included the header, I suspect the preprocessor isn't having a good time dealing with a massive header file. –  Wyatt Anderson Nov 5 '10 at 15:51
3  
That array is about 18M of memory. 6*512*512*3*sizeof(float) / 1024 /1024 = 18. Probably not a good idea to allocate this on the stack as there may be compiler limitations with a stack frame that size. –  Loki Astari Nov 5 '10 at 15:52
    
So, you want to pre-calculate some values, store them in an array, and use them. Where within this actions lies your problem? It seems like the pre-calculation is slow, that using the stored values is not possible as the compiler crashes, and that you are accessing those array values by looping... So, I'm sure I did not understand your question correctly... –  gimpf Nov 5 '10 at 15:54
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The method you describe is the best combination of efficiency and simplicity. If your compiler can't handle the entire array definition all at once, break the problem down into pieces. For example:

typedef float CubeFace[512][512][3];
CubeFace face1 = {etc};
...
CubeFace * textureMapSaved[6] = {&face1, &face2, &face3, &face4, &face5, &face6};

As an alternative, stop trying to make your definition a compilable text file and make it a binary file. You can read it into memory in one operation, or make it a memory mapped file and let the OS swap it as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. Compile the array definition into a separate object file and link it in statically or dynamically or extern it. –  Wyatt Anderson Nov 5 '10 at 15:57
1  
No don't compile the array at all, the last paragraph is the best advice: don't create source code but write the created array to a binary file and load it into memory using the read() library function. –  Peer Stritzinger Nov 5 '10 at 16:11
    
I intend to do as you say and save it as a binary. At the moment I have tried the first of your suggestions and I can compile the code but when it builds, it just crashes visual studios. What could be causing this? –  henryprescott Nov 6 '10 at 13:48
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Save your faces separately. Also, I seriously doubt that you need three coordinates per pixel; I'd bet that a single scalar, when combined with the inherent x, y values in the array coordinates, would be enough.

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As others have pointed out, the array size is no big deal. Something else is going wrong, e.g. you tried to put this on the stack as an automatic variable.

I'll add that when working with data sets of this size, cache efficiency plays a big role in performance. Your algorithm should try to do two things: 1) Keep array reads clustered near each other in both time and memory address. This means don't jump around in the high order dimensions, e.g. cube faces, until you are done processing the low order dimensions, e.g. individual vertices. Reorganize the array dimensions as necessary to help achieve this. 2) Try to touch the array in a predictable incremental pattern in terms of memory address. This allows the cache prefetchers to proactively bring data into cache ahead of time.

You could have all kinds of fun dividing the work into parallel tasks too.

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