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void foo() {
    static int x;
}

void bar() {
    static int x;
}

int main() {
    foo();
    bar();
}
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3  
Given that code? Nothing. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 5 '10 at 17:07
    
They don't declare the same variable. Two different functions can never declare the same static local variable. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 5 '10 at 17:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

They each see only their own one. A variable cannot be "seen" from outside the scope that it's declared in.

If, on the other hand, you did this:

static int x;

void foo() {
    static int x;
}

int main() {
    foo();
}

then foo() only sees its local x; the global x has been "hidden" by it. But changes to one don't affect the value of the other.

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@FredOverflow: Thanks for catching that... –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 5 '10 at 17:08
    
are anonymous namespaces considered better style than static globals in C++? The two uses of "static int x;" (one global, one local) seems to complicate the question. –  Flexo Nov 5 '10 at 17:08
3  
@awoodlannd: the use of static for this purpose is deprecated in C++ (D.2/1). Whether it's better style depends whether the person you ask agrees with that deprecation... –  Steve Jessop Nov 5 '10 at 17:17
    
@steve Wow, didn't realise that was actually deprecated, I'd come across quite a few (sensible) style guides that strongly discouraged it though. –  Flexo Nov 5 '10 at 17:37
1  
@awoodland: don't be over-awed, deprecation in the C++ standard really doesn't mean much. It's defined as "not guaranteed to be part of the Standard in future revisions". But non-deprecated features aren't guaranteed to be part of the Standard in future revisions, either, for example exported templates are straight removed from C++0x. 7.3.1.1/2 does specifically say that unnamed namespaces are superior, though. –  Steve Jessop Nov 5 '10 at 18:00

The variables are distinct, each function has it's own scope. So although both variables last for the lifetime of the process, they do not interfere with each other.

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This is perfectly fine. In practice the actual name of the variable in the output of the compiler can be thought of as something like function_bar_x, i.e. it is the responsibility of your compiler to ensure that these do not clash.

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Nothing happen, both variables have theri scope and mantain their values to call in call

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The two static vars are different.

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