Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Considering this:

[Flags]
public enum MyEnum {
    One = 1,
    Two = 2,
    Four = 4,
    Eight = 8
}

public static class FlagsHelper
{
    public static bool Contains(this MyEnum keys, MyEnum flag)
    {
        return (keys & flag) != 0;
    }
}

Is it possible to write a generic version of Contains that would work for any enum and not just MyEnum?

Edit:

This would be my version after reading your answers:

    public static bool Contains(this Enum keys, Enum flag)
    {
        ulong keysVal = Convert.ToUInt64(keys);
        ulong flagVal = Convert.ToUInt64(flag);

        return (keysVal & flagVal) == flagVal;
    }

Just realized is a bad idea to check the way I was checking (return (keys & flag) != 0;), because the flag parameter might be actually several flags and the common sense thing to do is return true only if keys contains all of them. Also, I wouldn't check for null values or even make sure they are the same type. I might want to use different types.

share|improve this question
1  
Might be of interest: stackoverflow.com/questions/7244/… –  Jim Mischel Nov 5 '10 at 18:34
1  
It might be a good idea to tag this with the version of C# you are using, as the latest version has this function built in. –  chilltemp Nov 5 '10 at 18:42
1  
I don't understand how your Contains method adds anything over the built-in instance method Enum.HasFlag(Enum). Looking at the decompiled code for that method, your method appears to be doing the exact same thing with a little less error checking. –  Carl G Oct 7 '12 at 14:31

8 Answers 8

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I based this method off of a bunch of SO & Google searches, and a by using reflector to see what MS did for the .NET 4 HasFlags method.

public static class EnumExt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Check to see if a flags enumeration has a specific flag set.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="variable">Flags enumeration to check</param>
    /// <param name="value">Flag to check for</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool HasFlag(this Enum variable, Enum value)
    {
        if (variable == null)
            return false;

        if (value == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("value");

        // Not as good as the .NET 4 version of this function, but should be good enough
        if (!Enum.IsDefined(variable.GetType(), value))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format(
                "Enumeration type mismatch.  The flag is of type '{0}', was expecting '{1}'.",
                value.GetType(), variable.GetType()));
        }

        ulong num = Convert.ToUInt64(value);
        return ((Convert.ToUInt64(variable) & num) == num);

    }

}

Notes:

  • This handles nulls
  • Does type checking
  • Converts to a ulong, and can handle any positive enum value. Microsoft cautions against the use of negative flags enumerations anyway:

    Use caution if you define a negative number as a flag enumerated constant because many flag positions might be set to 1, which might make your code confusing and encourage coding errors.

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't generic, and casting something that uses a negative enum value might be dangerous. I would suggest throwing in a check:: Type.GetTypeCode(variable.GetType()) == TypeCode.UInt64 ? Convert.ToUInt64(...) : Convert.ToInt64(...) Yeah its double the work, but you're a lot safer. –  Michael B Nov 5 '10 at 21:08
    
Agreed, not 'generic' as in it doesn't use generics. But it works on all reasonable flags enumerations. For a flags enumeration to work, all flags must have the same sign. And a negative flag would actually be setting 2 bits of the value. So while technically possible to have a negative flag, this method is only the beginning of the potential problems. It's possible that there are other enum functions that will break with negative values. Use of ulong is part of what I learned from reflecting the .NET 4 HasFlag function. –  chilltemp Nov 5 '10 at 21:34

Not sure if you're using .NET 4.0 or not, but it comes with the static method Enum.HasFlags().

-- Code Removed (the accepted solution has it already) --

share|improve this answer
    
How could you emulate it? I do have 4.0 and didn't notice the Enum.HasFlags() method, but now I'm just curious. –  Juan Nov 5 '10 at 18:25
    
Your code does not compile for me. Even if I remove the extraneous semicolon from the 3rd line and change the expression to return (keys & flag) == flag, I get "Operator '&' cannot be applied to operands of type 'System.Enum' and 'System.Enum'. –  Jim Mischel Nov 5 '10 at 18:28
    
It says "Operator '&' cannot be applied to operands of type 'System.Enum' and 'System.Enum'". –  Juan Nov 5 '10 at 18:28
    
This code does not compile. –  JaredPar Nov 5 '10 at 18:29

You can basically use your existing extension method, byt use the Enum type instead of MyEnum. The problem then is that it doesn't know the enums are flags and won't allow the & operator, so you just have to convert the enum values to numbers.

    public static bool Contains(this Enum keys, Enum flag)
    {
        if (keys.GetType() != flag.GetType())
            throw new ArgumentException("Type Mismatch");
        return (Convert.ToUInt64(keys) & Convert.ToUInt64(flag)) != 0;
    }

And a unit test for good measure:

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestContains()
    {
        var e1 = MyEnum.One | MyEnum.Two;
        Assert.IsTrue( e1.Contains(MyEnum.Two) );

        var e2 = MyEnum.One | MyEnum.Four;
        Assert.IsFalse(e2.Contains(MyEnum.Two));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Side-note; technically the type checking doesn't have to be there, since we are converting back to a number, so if you wanted to compare 2 different types of enums, then you could remove those 2 lines. –  CodingWithSpike Nov 5 '10 at 19:00

This is my approach this is Type safe and doesn't do any boxing or unboxing. It throws an exception if the type is not an enum. There is a technique you can use if you want to turn it into a public static method that will be typed to Enum's, but it can't be an extension method then. There is also no need to check for null, as the struct contraint blocks out nullable enum's as well. I don't think there is much to be done to improve this code, with the exception of maybe writing it in F# or C++/CLI so that you can put an enum constraint on it. The idea is to build a function using expression trees that will convert the enum to either long if its anything but a ulong based enum, or ulong and then and them, essentially producing:: return value & flag == flag

public static class EnumExtensions
 {
  #region Public Static Methods 
  /// <summary>
  /// Determines whether the specified value has flags. Note this method is up to 60 times faster
  /// than the one that comes with .NET 4 as it avoids any explict boxing or unboxing. 
  /// </summary>
  /// <typeparam name="TEnum">The type of the enum.</typeparam>
  /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
  /// <param name="flag">The flag.</param>
  /// <returns>
  ///  <c>true</c> if the specified value has flags; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
  /// </returns>
  /// <exception cref="ArgumentException">If TEnum is not an enum.</exception>
  public static bool HasFlags<TEnum>(this TEnum value, TEnum flag) where TEnum:struct,IComparable,IConvertible,IFormattable
  {
   return EnumExtensionsInternal<TEnum>.HasFlagsDelegate(value, flag);
  }
  #endregion Public Static Methods 

  #region Nested Classes 

  static class EnumExtensionsInternal<TEnum> where TEnum : struct,IComparable, IConvertible, IFormattable
  {
  #region Public Static Variables 
   /// <summary>
   /// The delegate which determines if a flag is set.
   /// </summary>
   public static readonly Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool> HasFlagsDelegate = CreateHasFlagDelegate();
  #endregion Public Static Variables 

  #region Private Static Methods 
   /// <summary>
   /// Creates the has flag delegate.
   /// </summary>
   /// <returns></returns>
   private static Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool> CreateHasFlagDelegate()
   {
    if(!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
    {
     throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} is not an Enum", typeof(TEnum)), typeof(EnumExtensionsInternal<>).GetGenericArguments()[0].Name);
    }
    ParameterExpression valueExpression = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEnum));
    ParameterExpression flagExpression = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEnum));
    ParameterExpression flagValueVariable = Expression.Variable(Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(TEnum)) == TypeCode.UInt64 ? typeof(ulong) : typeof(long));
    Expression<Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool>> lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool>>(
      Expression.Block(
        new[] { flagValueVariable },
        Expression.Assign(
          flagValueVariable,
          Expression.Convert(
            flagExpression,
            flagValueVariable.Type
          )
        ),
        Expression.Equal(
          Expression.And(
            Expression.Convert(
              valueExpression,
              flagValueVariable.Type
            ),
            flagValueVariable
          ),
          flagValueVariable
        )
      ),
      valueExpression,
      flagExpression
    );
    return lambdaExpression.Compile();
   }
  #endregion Private Static Methods 
  }
  #endregion Nested Classes 
 }

As I forgot that the expression tree above is .NET 4 only the following method should work in .NET 3.5 to create the same expression tree::

        private static Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool> CreateHasFlagDelegate2()
        {
            if(!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} is not an Enum", typeof(TEnum)), typeof(EnumExtensionsInternal<>).GetGenericArguments()[0].Name);
            }
            ParameterExpression valueExpression = Expression.Parameter(
                    typeof(TEnum),
                    typeof(TEnum).Name
            );
            ParameterExpression flagExpression = Expression.Parameter(
                    typeof(TEnum),
                    typeof(TEnum).Name
            );
            var targetType = Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(TEnum)) == TypeCode.UInt64 ? typeof(ulong) : typeof(long);
            Expression<Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool>> lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<TEnum, TEnum, bool>>(
                            Expression.Equal(
                                    Expression.And(
                                            Expression.Convert(
                                                    valueExpression,
                                                    targetType
                                            ),
                                            Expression.Convert(
                                                flagExpression,
                                                targetType
                                            )
                                    ),
                                    Expression.Convert(
                                        flagExpression,
                                        targetType
                                    )
                            ),
                    valueExpression,
                    flagExpression
            );
            return lambdaExpression.Compile();
        }

this version should compile in .NET 3.5 and if it doesn't I can't understand why.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting approach, but judging by the methods you are using this is .NET 4. We've already determined that .NET 4 isn't an option. An it has a built in function to do this anyway. –  chilltemp Nov 5 '10 at 21:15
    
Ah actually everything in here could be done without .Net 4 the only thing is that for minor more efficiency, I save the result of casting the flag as it has to be cast twice. This is not allowed in .Net 3.5, however, you can actually replace the flagValueVariable usage and the assignment:: I'll revise the answer to support .net 3.5. –  Michael B Nov 5 '10 at 21:21

Unfortunately no there is not a good way to make an extension method like this. In order for this to work you'd need to have a generic method which operated on enum values. Unfortunately there is no way to constrain generic arguments to be an enum

// Ilegal
public static bool Contains<T>(this T value, T flag) where T : enum {
  ...
}

The best I've come up with is the following

public static bool HasFlag<T>(this System.Enum e, T flag) 
{
    var intValue = (int)(object)e;
    var intFlag = (int)(object)flag;
    return (intValue & intFlag) != 0;
}

However it's limited in several ways

  • Not type safe because there is no requirement the value and the flag have the same type
  • Assumes that all enum values are int based.
  • Causes boxing to occur for a simple bit check
  • Will throw if e is null
share|improve this answer
    
This is really dangerous and should not be used because of the casting to object and than once again to int. Also e might be null as Enum is a reference type. –  Michael B Nov 5 '10 at 21:06
    
@Michael, this was noted in the limitations. –  JaredPar Nov 5 '10 at 21:08
    
Nowhere does it state that it will throw an exception if e is null :), but yeah. –  Michael B Nov 5 '10 at 21:12
    
@Michael, Added. I still find it odd to consider the types System.Enum and System.Class are actually reference types. –  JaredPar Nov 5 '10 at 21:29
1  
The microsoft coding standard says its bad taste to throw NullReferenceExceptions. You should add argument validation. –  Michael B Nov 5 '10 at 22:51

This is an example of something that should work.

public static bool IsValid<T>(this T value)
{
    return Enum.IsDefined(value.GetType(), value);
}
share|improve this answer

I have another approach here that I just cooked up quickly using the fact that Delegate.CreateDelegate allows conversion between methods for Enum's and their underlying types. The following approach is much like my previous answer but I feel might be easier to read for people who don't know expression tree syntax. Basically we know that Enums only have 8 possible underlying types, and so we just create a static method for each call it could use. Since I'm going for brevity I use anonymous methods which happened to be named the same thing as the possible typecode values.This approach will work in .Net 3.5::

public static class EnumHelper
{
    delegate bool HasFlag<T>(T left,T right);
    static readonly HasFlag<Byte> Byte = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<SByte> Sbyte = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<Int16> Int16 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<UInt16> UInt16 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<Int32> Int32 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<UInt32> UInt32 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<Int64> Int64 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;
    static readonly HasFlag<UInt64> UInt64 = (x,y)=> (x&y) ==y;

    public static bool HasFlags<TEnum>(this TEnum @enum,TEnum flag) where TEnum:struct,IConvertible,IComparable,IFormattable
    {
        return Enum<TEnum>.HasFlag(@enum,flag);
    }
    class Enum<TEnum> where TEnum:struct,IConvertible,IComparable,IFormattable
    {
        public static HasFlag<TEnum> HasFlag = CreateDelegate();
        static HasFlag<TEnum> CreateDelegate()
        {
            if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum) throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} is not an enum", typeof(TEnum)), typeof(Enum<>).GetGenericArguments()[0].Name);
            var delegateName = Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(TEnum)).ToString();
            var @delegate = typeof(EnumHelper).GetField(delegateName,BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic).GetValue(null) as Delegate;
            return Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(HasFlag<TEnum>), @delegate.Method) as HasFlag<TEnum>;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Another way of implementing HasFlag function for the .NET Framework 3.5.

public static bool HasFlag(this Enum e, Enum flag)
{
    // Check whether the flag was given
    if (flag == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("flag");
    }

    // Compare the types of both enumerations
    if (e.GetType() != (flag.GetType()))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format(
            "The type of the given flag is not of type {0}", e.GetType()),
            "flag");
    }

    // Get the type code of the enumeration
    var typeCode = e.GetTypeCode();

    // If the underlying type of the flag is signed
    if (typeCode == TypeCode.SByte || typeCode == TypeCode.Int16 || typeCode == TypeCode.Int32 ||
        typeCode == TypeCode.Int64)
    {
        return (Convert.ToInt64(e) & Convert.ToInt64(flag)) != 0;
    }

    // If the underlying type of the flag is unsigned
    if (typeCode == TypeCode.Byte || typeCode == TypeCode.UInt16 || typeCode == TypeCode.UInt32 ||
        typeCode == TypeCode.UInt64)
    {
        return (Convert.ToUInt64(e) & Convert.ToUInt64(flag)) != 0;
    }

    // Unsupported flag type
    throw new Exception(string.Format("The comparison of the type {0} is not implemented.", e.GetType().Name));
}

This extension method supports all the possible types for an enumeration (byte, sbyte, short, ushort, int, uint, long and ulong). Basically, the method checks if the given enumeration is signed/unsigned and converts the flag to the type with the highest size of the supported types for an enumeration. Then, a simple comparison is performed using the & operator.

As explained in other posts, we cannot define a constraint of the generic type with an enumeration and it doesn't make sense to use generic with a struct constraint, because w developers could insert other enumerations types or structures then. So, I think it's better to not use generic method for that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.