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I am looking at learning to program a Java EE/SE web application with the following components:

  • JBoss
  • nHibernate
  • JSTL

I'm sure there are other pieces. That's all I know at the moment. Would I be better off, with Netbeans or Eclipse? Netbeans always seemed more friendly to me but I've never made anything big with it. I wanted to start fresh. Using the technologies I mentioned is there any advantage to one or the other?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're using JBoss then there is Eclipse support directly:

I think the O/S definitely has a big impact on the stability of the IDE. Under Ubuntu 10 I don't see Eclipse crash that often. I can't speak for Netbeans unfortunately.

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I use both platforms concurrently on different projects, they share a lot of features mapped to similar short cuts and you would really only need a few hours of practise to be very productive in one after moving to the other.

Netbeans positives are that it seems a more polished platform and I use it for all "straight up" development.

Eclipse has a wider range of plugins, and I use eclipse where I need some specific plug-in. Sometimes it feels a bit unstable and some of the plug-ins feel experimental, but the core stuff is great.

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Personally, I'm using Eclipse (currently the Spring Source Tool Suite distribution).
I would recommend using one of the numerous Eclipse distribution matching your needs.
As for JBoss support, go with @Jon recommendation for supported plug-ins (I'm using JBoss Tools and it's working great).

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I currently am working with Netbeans on a Java, Stripes, Hibernate, JSP, & JSTL project. I think it works great!

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