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when I use some nested if / else statements, somethimes I get confused if my code logic corresponds to my original idea. I use some simple procedural code, so how can I train my understanding?

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Do you use proper code indention? –  Your Common Sense Nov 5 '10 at 19:54
    
If you get the indentation wrong and can't figure out how all these braces fit together a nice trick is to use an editor that can reindent the code for you. –  Alexandre Jasmin Nov 5 '10 at 19:57
    
Yep, it is my current approach, indenting correctly to understand the nesting of code. Thanks. –  Edgar Nov 5 '10 at 20:01
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try to split your code up into functions. If you have deeply nested if/else statements then you can probably create well-named functions for both the "if" tests and the resulting logic. For example, change:

if ($something == "a" && $somethingElse == "b") {
    // code
}
else if ($whatever > 4) {
    // more code
}
else {
    // yet more code
}

to

if (condition1True()) {
    handleCondition1();
}
else if (condition2True()) {
    handleCondition2();
}
else {
    handleDefaultCondition();
}

Making your code read more like English means you can more easily understand how it works. You can also split your functionality so that each function only needs to do something simple then compose those functions into higher-level behaviour.

EDIT: Regarding comments, I tend to go for well-named functions and variables rather than copious commenting. If you can read the code without comments then that's ideal, but obviously you will still need comments sometimes. Definitely worth writing Javadoc-style comments for each function detailing the meanings of the arguments and return value, but inline comments in the code are sometimes more hindrance than help.

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That sounds good Cameron, I will try it, other options are appreciated. Thanks. –  Edgar Nov 5 '10 at 19:53
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Comments! Write your original ideas in comments above each if/else block, and then make sure the conditionals for each block match the pseudo code you outlined in the comment. If they do, go back after you're done an re-read the comments - if the logic in them still seems valid, then there's a good chance your code will be good to go. I find it much easier to read comments outlining what a conditional does than to decipher each conditional on the fly. Of course, that means keeping comments up to date as well.

One of the best programmers I've ever met stubbed out functions with comments detailing how the function was supposed to work. He could read it back in plain English to make sure it made sense, and then implementation was, as he said, a simple matter of translation. This may not be for everyone, but it may help you keep focused.

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Simplify complex conditionals and inner logic with appropriate function calls. Refactor you code to make it more clear, into small chunks. Use switch statements if appropriate, polymorphism if dealing with similar objects, etc.

Seeing some sample code would help give a more appropriate example, but consider the following contrived example:

if($a.isAnimal && $a.animalIsAlive){
  if($a.isDog){
    if(!$a.hasHadWalk && date('h') > 6 && date('h') < 20){
            getLeash();
            attachLeashToCollar();
            putOnShoes();
            ...
        }else{
          //doNotWalk  
        }
      }else{
        //some other stuff here
      }
    }

could be refactored into

if(canBreathe($a)){
  if($a.isDog){
    if(shouldWeWalk($a)){
        walkDog();
    }
  }else{
    //some other stuff here
  }
}

function canBreathe($a){
    return $a.isAlive && $a.isAnimal;
}

function walkDog(){
    getLeash();
    attachLeashToCollar();
    putOnShoes();
    ...
}

function shouldWeWalk($a){
    return (!$a.hasHadWalk && date('h') > 6 && date('h') < 20);
}
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First make a copy of the PHP file ;-)

Then try to refactor some of the deeply nested conditionals code blocks into their own functions and choose the name of these functions carefully.

That will force you to think about the code.

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I think

if (condition1True()) {
    handleCondition1();
}
else if (condition2True()) {
    handleCondition2();
}
else {
    handleDefaultCondition();
}

this variant is more preferable, because of better understanding what program doing.

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