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Me and a colleague are having a debate:

We have a singleton class that is used at multiple places in our code base.

Originally, the class was designed in such a way that you could get the class object but that object would not be completely initialized.

By this I mean:

mySingleton.getInstance().SomeMethod();

SomeMethod would cause errors because the class was not initialized. For the class to work properly, this would have to happen:

mySingleton.getInstance().initObject();

mySingleton.getInstance().SomeMethod();

Anyways, The debate I have is that the constructor (called with the first get instance) should call initObject so that no errors can be thrown.

What do you think?

My colleague likes it the other way so he knows when the class is getting initialized. (ie he calls initObject at 1 specific line of code and hopes that nothing else needs it first).

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3  
In many cases, the best solution is simply not to use a Singleton in the first place -- instead, use a normal instance object, and simply inject the instance into classes that need it (either manually passing it into the constructor or some such, or by using an IoC framework). –  Daniel Pryden Nov 5 '10 at 22:10
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6 Answers

You're closer to the usual way that the singleton pattern is implemented in Java than your colleague. Please, take a look at Wikipedia. There you will find the 3 most common Java implementations:

Traditional simple way

public class Singleton {
    private static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();

    // Private constructor prevents instantiation from other classes
    private Singleton() {}

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return INSTANCE;
    }
}

The "solution of Bill Pugh"

public class Singleton {
    // Private constructor prevents instantiation from other classes
    private Singleton() {}

    /**
     * SingletonHolder is loaded on the first execution of Singleton.getInstance() 
     * or the first access to SingletonHolder.INSTANCE, not before.
     */
    private static class SingletonHolder { 
        public static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
    }
}

Traditional simple way using synchronization

public class Singleton {
    // volatile is needed so that multiple threads can reconcile the instance
    // semantics for volatile changed in Java 5.
    private volatile static Singleton singleton;

    private Singleton() {}

    // synchronized keyword has been removed from here
    public static Singleton getSingleton() {
        // needed because once there is singleton available no need to acquire
        // monitor again & again as it is costly
        if (singleton == null) {
            synchronized (Singleton.class) {
                // this is needed if two threads are waiting at the monitor at the
                // time when singleton was getting instantiated
                if (singleton == null) {
                    singleton = new Singleton();
                }
            }
        }
        return singleton;
    }
}

Neither of them make use of a separated initObject() method (initialization is supposed to be inside the private constructor). Also notice that if you have a separated, public initObject() method, you may have multi-threading issues...

BTW, personally I rather use the "Bill Pugh" alternative, but the 3 ways are valid.

Edit After the kind Esko comment, I'm adding the following implementation, which is not available on Wikipedia. I just would like to add that 1) The singleton instance is not lazily created like the 3 options above; 2) Since it is a enum, you cannot extend any class; and 3) It is very, very weird. But it seems to be quite hyped on the Java community, so it is here:

Enum way

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
    Singleton() {
        /* Your init code goes here */
    }
}
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1  
None of these, curiously, uses enum which is the easiest way to implement a singleton in Java. –  Esko Nov 5 '10 at 22:18
    
@Esko: in fact I find the enum implementation a little bit weird semantically (basically a Java WTF), but OK, I'm going to edit my answer to add it... –  rsenna Nov 6 '10 at 1:17
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In my opinion having an initObject() method is unnecessary and seems to defeat the purpose of having a singleton. I feel that the assumption of anyone using your singleton will assume that when they call getInstance() that they will get a fully functional instance of the class. Why complicate things and add confusion to your code by requiring someone to call initObject() before they can even use it. Why does someone need to know when the object is initialized, shouldn't it be assumed that the object retrieved is already initialized?

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I would put an initialization check in the getInstance() method:

public static MySingleton getInstance() {
  if (! isInitialized)
    initialize();
  return instance;
}

... and make the initialize() method private.

EDIT: Apparently I misunderstood the question. The main issue is whether the initObject() should be inside or outside the constructor. The correct answer may depend on the actual problem, but I think it should generally be inside the constructor, because if the sole purpose of putting the initObject() method outside the constructor is to tell everyone where initialization happens, you might as well write a comment:

// Attention everyone!! Object is initialized here!!1!11!
MySingleton instance = MySingleton.getInstance();

// Object is NOT initialized here!!11!1!!
MySingleton instance2 = MySingleton.getInstance();
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4  
If you want to follow that way, you must place that initialization check inside a synchronized block (in order to get thread-safety). –  rsenna Nov 5 '10 at 21:36
    
+1 for "if the sole purpose of putting the initObject() method outside the constructor is to tell everyone where initialization happens, you might as well write a comment". –  Daniel Pryden Nov 5 '10 at 22:11
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Your approach is closer to the idea of a Singleton, to begin with.

The initialization stuff should be transparent to the user(s) of the Singleton. A good way to do it is not even using a constructor, but putting the initObject code within a static block, at the beginning of the class definition.

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I don't understand why you need an initObject method at all. If this is a singleton, that method will get call only once anyways. I would just inline the method inside the constructor itself.

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Thanks Team, I agree with all of you. I think initObject was the result of some frustrating debugging.. or something... Anyways, its good to get feedback. Thanks again. –  Patrick Lewis Nov 7 '10 at 7:25
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If you can avoid it, don't have an initObject method.

It might be unavoidable in two situations:

  • The initialization of the singleton has to happen at a particular point during the application startup, and this is the only sensible way to force that to happen.

  • The initialization of the singleton requires parameters that can only supplied this way; e.g. parameters that are constructed from command line arguments.

If you do have to have an init method, it should throw an exception if it is called twice. It may also be a good idea for getInstance() method to throw an exception if it is called too soon.

These should be applied to the "traditional" examplar in @rsenna's answer.

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Thanks Team, I agree with all of you. I think initObject was the result of some frustrating debugging.. or something... Anyways, its good to get feedback. –  Patrick Lewis Nov 7 '10 at 7:24
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