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I've been looking for a simple Java algorithm to generate a pseudo-random alpha-numeric string. In my situation it would be used as a unique session/key identifier that would "likely" be unique over 500K+ generation (my needs don't really require anything much more sophisticated). Ideally, I would be able to specify a length depending on my uniqueness needs. For example, a generated string of length 12 might look something like "AEYGF7K0DM1X".

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61  
Beware the birthday paradox. –  pablosaraiva Oct 25 '10 at 15:07
7  
@c0mrade en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthday_problem –  pablosaraiva Oct 26 '10 at 15:05
23  
Even taking the birthday paradox in consideration, if you use 12 alphanumeric characters (62 total), you would still need well over 34 billion strings to reach the paradox. And the birthday paradox doesn't guarantee a collision anyways, it just says it's over 50% chance. –  NullUserException Oct 29 '12 at 4:13

34 Answers 34

/**
    Generate a random String with maxlength random
    characters found in the ASCII table between 33
    and 122 (so it contains every lowercase / uppercase
    letters, numbers and some others characters
*/
public static String GetRandomString(int maxlength)
{
    String result = "";
    int i = 0, n = 0, min = 33, max = 122;
    while(i < maxlength)
    {
        n = (int)(Math.random() * (max - min) + min);
        if(n >= 33 && n < 123)
        {
            result += (char)n;
            ++i;
        }
    }
    return(result);
}
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You can use this simple java function:

 public class GenerateRandomString {
   private static final String ALPHA_NUM =
           "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      GenerateRandomString grs = new GenerateRandomString();
      System.out.println(grs.getAlphaNumeric(10));
      System.out.println(grs.getAlphaNumeric(20));
   }
   public String getAlphaNumeric(int len) {
      StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(len);
      for (int i=0;  i<len;  i++) {
         int ndx = (int)(Math.random()*ALPHA_NUM.length());
         sb.append(ALPHA_NUM.charAt(ndx));
      }
      return sb.toString();
   }
}
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You can make it the hard way:

package gaming;

import java.util.Random;

public class game2 {

public static char c;
public static Random r = new Random();
public static int i = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i2 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i3 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i4= r.nextInt(25);
public static int i5 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int num2 = r.nextInt(9);
public static int num3= r.nextInt(9);
public static String s1 = String.valueOf(num2);
public static String s2 = String.valueOf(num3);

public static void main(String[] args){


    System.out.print("The pin is: ");
    changeToString(i);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i2);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i3);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i4);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i5);
    System.out.print(c);
    System.out.print(s1);
    System.out.print(s2);

}

public static void changeToString(int rand){

    switch (rand){

    case 0:

        c = 'A';
        break;
    case 1:

        c = 'B';
        break;
    case 2:

        c = 'C';
        break;
    case 3:

        c = 'D';
        break;
    case 4:

        c = 'E';
        break;
    case 5:

        c = 'F';
        break;
    case 6:

        c = 'G';
        break;
    case 7:

        c = 'H';
        break;
    case 8:

        c = 'I';
        break;
    case 9:

        c = 'J';
        break;
    case 10:

        c = 'K';
        break;
    case 11:

        c = 'L';
        break;
    case 12:

        c = 'M';
        break;
    case 13:

        c = 'N';
        break;
    case 14:

        c = 'O';
        break;
    case 15:

        c = 'P';
        break;
    case 16:

        c = 'Q';
        break;
    case 17:

        c = 'R';
        break;
    case 18:

        c = 'S';
        break;
    case 19:

        c = 'T';
        break;
    case 20:

        c = 'U';
        break;
    case 21:

        c = 'V';
        break;
    case 22:

        c = 'W';
        break;
    case 23:

        c = 'X';
        break;
    case 24:

        c = 'Y';
        break;
    case 25:

        c = 'Z';
        break;

    }

}
}
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Yet another solution..

public static String generatePassword(int passwordLength) {
    int asciiFirst = 33;
    int asciiLast = 126;
    Integer[] exceptions = { 34, 39, 96 };

    List<Integer> exceptionsList = Arrays.asList(exceptions);
    SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i=0; i<passwordLength; i++) {
        int charIndex;
        do {
            charIndex = random.nextInt(asciiLast - asciiFirst + 1) + asciiFirst;
        }
        while (exceptionsList.contains(charIndex));

        builder.append((char) charIndex);
    }

    return builder.toString();
}
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protected by Mosty Mostacho Oct 9 '13 at 19:34

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