Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm refactoring some MVC code that originally used POST'ed form data. The form's fields are serialized using jquery's serialize() method and sent to an MVC controller Save Action that checks things out and redirects as appropriate (if errors in form values, redirect to the Edit Action, if fine then save and redirect to the Display Action). All actions are invoked via AJAX and return Partial Views. Everything works grand. Note: The site uses AD-based authorization, so users are prompted for their windows credentials upon first loading the site, but are never prompted again.

However, I'm now looking to interact with the server via JSON objects instead of form fields. Granted, I serialize the JSON object on the client and, with the aid of an imported MVC2 Futures/MVC3 class JsonValueProviderFactory, am able to correctly model bind the sent JSON object to a C# class in the Controller's parameters.

I maintain the same logic, but things start to blow up when I try to return a RedirectToAction ActionResult when the Controller accepts JSON objects. I lose authentication, the user is prompted for their credentials again, and I find myself in a infinite loop on the originally requested Action (save). Every time the user is prompted for credentials and simply runs through the Save Action again. The end result for the user is an unending alerts prompting for login credentials. Neither of the actions specified in the RedirectToAction calls are ever hit.

Can the fact that the original request uses a JSON contentType be interfering with the behavior of RedirectToAction? That's the only thing I can think of as it works fine when I don't use JSON to post and it works fine when I return PartialViews instead of using RedirectToAction. The infinite repeat of the Controller Action and continual loss of authorization credentials seems to suggest that RedirectToAction is not the way to go in this situation.

I can post code on request. I am also successfully handling stuff like copying the ModelState over to TempData and other RedirectToAction tricks. Again, it DOES work when using a non-JSON solution. Any insight is greatly appreciated!!


EDIT WITH FOLLOW-UP INFO:

Turns out, I get an "Unauthorized" error even when I completely disable NTLM authentication/authorization for the site. IIS server doesn't look for any authorization, web site doesn't look for any authorization, yet the error when trying to Redirect with JSON contentType request still occurs and complains of being "Unauthorized". This is WEIRD.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

To update everyone, I haven't found a solution nor do I know for-sure what the situation is. However, I'm willing to bet it has to do with the fact that RedirectToAction issues http GET requests and the action I'm redirecting to only accepts POSTs. Even if I remove the restriction, it's still sending JSON data and it still needs to be done by POST.

In short, RedirectToAction with JSON data appears to be fundamentally undoable. You need to POST JSON data but RedirectToAction emits GET requests. That's my going theory, at least. =)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.