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-edited for clarity-

I am interested in finding the zero point of a multidimensional autocorrelation function.

I can generate the autocorrelation matrix from my data using

acm <- autocorr(x, 1:10)

However, the full matrix can be on the order of 20 x 5000, and this is computationally expensive.

I would therefore like to calculate only 1 or n rows at a time.

Here are the steps that I would like to take

  1. calculate the first row in the matrix
  2. while(any column has all positive values) calculate and append the next row of the matrix to the already calculated rows
  3. identify the row index of the last column to reach zero

If this is the full matrix:

acm <- cbind( c(10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 1, -1),
              c(10, 8, 6, 5, 3, 1, -1, 1, -1, 0 ))

I want a function that will return 10 because the first col is the last to reach a negative value. If I calculated the full matrix first, the following would be sufficient:

max(which(apply(acm, 2, min)))

But I want to avoid calculating more of acm than needed, e.g. because often only 1 or a small fraction of the rows are necessary for the calculation.

share|improve this question
1  
your acm is malformed, and your functional solution can't work : apply doesn't give a logical result. – Joris Meys Nov 8 '10 at 16:39
    
sorry about that, the vectors were different length, but I have fixed this. – David LeBauer Nov 8 '10 at 17:34

There is a loop solution, using the break function. This is a hack using indices and a vector tt to keep track of which columns already showed a negative value.

find.point <- function(x){
    tt <- rep(F,ncol(x))         # control vector tt

    for (i in 1:nrow(x)){
        tt[which(x[i,]<0)] <- T  # check which columns have negative value
        if(all(tt)) break        # if all have reached negative, get out of loop
    }
    i                          # return index
}

Output is the same as the oneliner

max(apply(acm<0,2,function(x) match(T,x)))

Which you tried to refer to in your question I believe. I don't really see where your performance problem comes from. It depends whether you have 5000 columns or 5000 rows. In any case, even with a dataset ten times as big, calculations happen within a second for me using the oneliner:

Timings:

> acm <- matrix(rep(seq.int(5000,-5999),100),ncol=22)

> dim(acm)
[1] 50000    22

> system.time(max(apply(acm<0,2,function(x) match(T,x))))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.05    0.00    0.05 

> system.time(find.point(acm))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.05    0.00    0.05 

Yet, timing is substantially improved with the function over the oneliner when you have many columns :

> acm <- matrix(rep(seq.int(5000,-5999),100),ncol=50000)

> dim(acm)
[1]    22 50000

> system.time(max(apply(acm<0,2,function(x) match(T,x))))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.85    0.01    0.86 

> system.time(find.point(acm))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.03    0.00    0.04 

Heck, you forced me to think out a for-loop solution that works faster than a oneliner. Cool question!

share|improve this answer
    
That is a nice solution. I didn't realize that it would be quicker this way, but it is neat to have proved a point. The performance problem comes in the calculation of the autocorrelation matrix using autocorr.diag() from the coda package, which can take over 50 seconds on a fairly fast server, e.g. acf <- autocorr.plot(mcmc.object) – David LeBauer Nov 8 '10 at 17:32
1  
@David: So actually you want to calculate the autocorrelation matrix row by row... oh boy, that's going to be a hard one. You might want to try that one on stats.stackexchange.com. It should be possible, but I can't really come up with a quick solution right now. – Joris Meys Nov 8 '10 at 17:48
    
yes, or in segments. I have a related question asking for a more general solution, with my proposed answer that incorporates your code, already on stats.stackexchange: stats.stackexchange.com/q/4258/1381 – David LeBauer Nov 8 '10 at 17:58

I'm not sure exactly what your function is doing, but to answer the question "How can I find the last row of a dynamically generated matrix in which the value of the column goes below zero?":

findlastzero = function(mat){
     apply(mat<0, 2, function(x)tail(which(x),1 ))
   }

set.seed(1)
a <- cbind(rnorm(10), rnorm(10), rnorm(10), rnorm(10)) + 0.5

a

            [,1]       [,2]        [,3]        [,4]
 [1,] -0.1264538  2.0117812  1.41897737  1.85867955
 [2,]  0.6836433  0.8898432  1.28213630  0.39721227
 [3,] -0.3356286 -0.1212406  0.57456498  0.88767161
 [4,]  2.0952808 -1.7146999 -1.48935170  0.44619496
 [5,]  0.8295078  1.6249309  1.11982575 -0.87705956
 [6,] -0.3204684  0.4550664  0.44387126  0.08500544
 [7,]  0.9874291  0.4838097  0.34420449  0.10571005
 [8,]  1.2383247  1.4438362 -0.97075238  0.44068660
 [9,]  1.0757814  1.3212212  0.02184994  1.60002537
[10,]  0.1946116  1.0939013  0.91794156  1.26317575


findlastzero(a)
[1] 6 4 8 5

Not sure if that is what you are asking for, however..

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, close, but I am trying to find the index of the row that is the last to have a negative number; rather than examining the entire matrix at once, starting with a subset of n rows, and if there are some rows that have not hit zero, adding another n rows and doing the test. The problem is that it can take a few minutes to calculate the full matrix, and there will usually be a number < 0 in the first 50 rows, although sometimes it may take a few thousand rows. – David LeBauer Nov 6 '10 at 2:29

Not sure if I understood your question correctly, but you can use tapply to elide into each row in the matrix to extract the info you want.

I first create a "grouping matrix" of the same size as your a. This serves as the index for grouping each row to be fed as input into your lambda function.

matrix(rep(1:10,4),nrow=10,ncol=4)

I then run "tapply" on the original matrix with the grouping matrix. This subsets the matrix so that each row vector is passed into the function:

function(x) { return( x[which(x<0)] ) }

which simply returns all the values where value is less than zero per row.

> a
            [,1]       [,2]       [,3]       [,4]
 [1,]  0.5341781 -0.9263866 -0.5380141 -1.2453310
 [2,]  0.2931630  1.0490300  0.8127472  0.2473263
 [3,]  1.0936143 -0.3399709  1.8199833  1.0053080
 [4,]  1.0002433  0.2002659  1.7730118  1.7578414
 [5,]  0.8116914  0.9371518  0.8727981  1.4236349
 [6,] -0.1127914  1.1563594  1.0331311  0.7658510
 [7,] -0.5423493  1.8905533 -0.8121652  0.1355076
 [8,] -1.6589310  0.4081290  0.3560005  1.6043205
 [9,]  1.8760435  0.8826245  1.4457357  0.7561550
[10,] -0.8503400  0.2302597  0.5838986  0.1252952
> matrix(rep(1:10,4),nrow=10,ncol=4)
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
 [1,]    1    1    1    1
 [2,]    2    2    2    2
 [3,]    3    3    3    3
 [4,]    4    4    4    4
 [5,]    5    5    5    5
 [6,]    6    6    6    6
 [7,]    7    7    7    7
 [8,]    8    8    8    8
 [9,]    9    9    9    9
[10,]   10   10   10   10
> tapply(a, matrix(rep(1:10,4),nrow=10,ncol=4), function(x) { return(x[which(x<0)])})
$`1`
[1] -0.9263866 -0.5380141 -1.2453310

$`2`
numeric(0)

$`3`
[1] -0.3399709

$`4`
numeric(0)

$`5`
numeric(0)

$`6`
[1] -0.1127914

$`7`
[1] -0.5423493 -0.8121652

$`8`
[1] -1.658931

$`9`
numeric(0)

$`10`
[1] -0.85034
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