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Is there a linq command that will filter out duplicates that appear in a sequence?

Example with '4':

Original { 1 2 3 4 4 4 5 6 7 4 4 4 8 9 4 4 4 }
Filtered { 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 4 8 9 4 }

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Similar to svick's answer, except with side effects to avoid the cons and reverse:

int[] source = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 4, 4, 8, 9, 4, 4, 4 };

List<int> result = new List<int> { source.First() };
source.Aggregate((acc, c) =>
    {
        if (acc != c)
            result.Add(c);
        return c;
    });

Edit: No longer needs the source.First() as per mquander's concern:

int[] source = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 4, 4, 8, 9, 4, 4, 4 };

List<int> result = new List<int>();
result.Add(
    source.Aggregate((acc, c) =>
    {
        if (acc != c)
            result.Add(acc);
        return c;
    })
);

I think I still like Danny's solution the most.

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I would be all over this solution except that the initial .First() kills it for operating on any lazy sequence. –  mquander Nov 6 '10 at 17:26
    
True, hmm...... –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 6 '10 at 19:28
    
There we go, check it out now :D –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 6 '10 at 19:40
1  
That is a really good solution, the best written here. –  mquander Nov 6 '10 at 22:02

Not really. I'd write this:

public static IEnumerable<T> RemoveDuplicates(this IEnumerable<T> sequence)
{
    bool init = false;
    T current = default(T);

    foreach (var x in sequence)
    {
        if (!init || !object.Equals(current, x))
            yield return x;

        current = x;
        init = true;
    }   
}
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2  
+1, but I would prefer a better name for the method... RemoveDuplicates is confusing because it seems to implies that all duplicates are removed, when actually only adjacent duplicates are removed. Perhaps something like RemoveAdjacentDuplicates –  Thomas Levesque Nov 6 '10 at 1:04
    
I don't disagree. I believe there's some usual name for this operation which I can't summon up right now. –  mquander Nov 6 '10 at 3:30
    
RemoveRepeats? –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 6 '10 at 12:02

Yes there is! One-line code and one loop of the array.

int[] source = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 4, 4, 8, 9, 4, 4, 4 };
var result = source.Where((item, index) => index + 1 == source.Length 
                          || item != source[index + 1]);

And according to @Hogan's advice, it can be better:

var result = source.Where((item, index) => index == 0 
                          || item != source[index - 1]);

More readable now i think. It means "choose the first element, and those which isn't equal to the previous one".

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+1: Good solution. Less readable than a non-LINQ solution, but LINQ is what the OP asked for, and this is probably the most readable LINQ based solution. –  Øyvind Bråthen Nov 6 '10 at 12:01
    
Funny, I actually think this is more readable. –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 6 '10 at 12:05
    
This assumes that the source collection is an array, and this is a trivial problem to solve when you have indexed access and a Length property. How about a solution that works on any IEnumerable<T> instead? (After all, the question talks about a sequence, not a list or an array.) –  LukeH Nov 6 '10 at 14:50
1  
feh, this is shorter : var result = source.Where((item, index) => index == 0 || item != source[index - 1]); –  Hogan Nov 6 '10 at 17:20
    
@Hogan: Good catch. I'll add it into the answer. –  Danny Chen Nov 6 '10 at 17:25

You can use Aggregate() (although I'm not sure whether it's better than the non-LINQ solution):

var ints = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 4, 4, 8, 9, 4, 4, 4 };

var result = ints.Aggregate(
    Enumerable.Empty<int>(),
    (list, i) =>
        list.Any() && list.First() == i
        ? list
        : new[] { i }.Concat(list)).Reverse();

I think it's O(n), but I'm not completely sure.

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1  
Creative, but hardly readable... –  Thomas Levesque Nov 6 '10 at 1:07
    
Probably the one most true to functional style, though. In F# it'd be something like ints |> List.fold(fun (l, i) c -> if c <> i then (c :: l, c) else (l, c)) ([], ints.Head + 1) |> fst |> List.rev. Now if there's a way to use yield or some other form of list comprehension, we're in business. –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 6 '10 at 12:25

If you're using .NET 4 then you can do this using the built-in Zip method, although I'd probably prefer to use a custom extension method like the one shown in mquander's answer.

// replace "new int[1]" below with "new T[1]" depending on the type of element
var filtered = original.Zip(new int[1].Concat(original),
                            (l, r) => new { L = l, R = r })
                       .Where((x, i) => (i == 0) || !object.Equals(x.L, x.R))
                       .Select(x => x.L);
share|improve this answer
    
It should be Skip(1), not Take(1)... –  Thomas Levesque Nov 6 '10 at 1:07
    
@Thomas: Nope, Take(1) is what I meant. Using Skip instead would break when there are dupes at the beginning of the sequence, for example { 1, 1, 2 }. –  LukeH Nov 6 '10 at 1:17
    
You're right, I missed the Concat part, so I thought it would only return 1 item –  Thomas Levesque Nov 6 '10 at 1:21

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