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I am trying to do a simple condition check, but it doesn't seem to work.

If $# is equal to 0 or is greater than 1 then say hello.

I have tried the following syntax with no success:

if [ "$#" == 0 -o "$#" > 1 ] ; then
 echo "hello"
fi

if [ "$#" == 0 ] || [ "$#" > 1 ] ; then
 echo "hello"
fi

Edit: I should mention this is for bash.

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They both work for me. Did you specify a shell in the shebang line? –  Jason McCreary Nov 6 '10 at 2:02
    
@Jason I actually forgot the shebang line, but I tested it with it just now and it didn't work. –  Strawberry Nov 6 '10 at 2:13
3  
> is output redirection in sh/bash. Now you probably have a file named 1. –  mark4o Nov 6 '10 at 2:14
    
@mark4o You are right. –  Strawberry Nov 6 '10 at 2:35
    
For information on Bash comparisons, please see my answers to previous questions here and here. For additional information regarding brackets, double brackets and double parentheses, see my answer here. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 6 '10 at 4:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 135 down vote accepted

This should work OK.

if [ "$#" == 0 ] || [ "$#" -gt 1 ] ; then
 echo "hello"
fi

I'm not sure if this is different in other shells but if you wish to use <, >, you need to put them inside double parenthesis like so:

if (("$#" > 1))
 ...
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I'm not sure if it's different in another shell but in bash, if you wish to use > or <, you have to put them in double parenthesis like so: (("$a" < "$b")) –  Coding District Nov 6 '10 at 2:13
    
@Doug: It's not that unix doesn't use them, it's that bash and all the other shells I know use them for input/output redirection. –  Jefromi Nov 6 '10 at 2:28
4  
Use -eq not ==. man test –  Mark Edgar Nov 7 '10 at 14:24
    
Also make sure you have #!/bin/bash at the top of the file. #!/bin/sh will break. –  redolent Jun 6 at 20:43

This code works for me:

#!/bin/sh

argc=$#
echo $argc
if [ $argc -eq 0 -o $argc -eq 1 ]; then
  echo "foo"
else
  echo "bar"
fi

I don't think sh supports "==". Use "=" to compare strings and -eq to compare ints.

man test

for more details.

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What is the option for greater than? Where's the official documentation for tihs? –  Strawberry Nov 6 '10 at 2:07
1  
Should be -gt for greater than. Or just replace it all with [ $# -ne 1 ]. –  mark4o Nov 6 '10 at 2:08
    
Greater than is -gt, see my answer. The official documentation is in man test as jbremnant has pointed out. –  Coding District Nov 6 '10 at 2:09

have you tried something like this:

if [ $# -eq 0 ] || [ $# -gt 1 ] 
then
 echo "$#"
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have. It echos hello even when I have a single argument. –  Strawberry Nov 6 '10 at 2:04
    
with bash this works for me. –  John Boker Nov 8 '10 at 15:54

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