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I want to verify a string is being set to a specific value in a Moq object.

I created a little console application to simulate what I want done.

using System;
using Moq;

namespace MoqVerifySet
{
    public interface MyInterface
    {
        string MyValue { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Mock<MyInterface> mockMyInterface = new Mock<MyInterface>();
            var myI = mockMyInterface.Object;
            myI.MyValue = @"hello 
                            world.
                            Please ignore
                            the whitespace";

            try
            {
                mockMyInterface.VerifySet(i => i.MyValue = "hello world. Please ignore the whitespace");
                Console.WriteLine("Success");
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error : {0}", ex.Message);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("\n\nPress any key to exit...");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

So, I thought I could just create a little method

public static string PrepSqlForComparison(string sql)
{
    Regex re = new Regex(@"\s+");
    return re.Replace(sql, " ").Trim().ToLower();
}

And change

mockMyInterface.VerifySet(i => i.MyValue = "hello world. Please ignore the whitespace");

to

mockMyInterface.VerifySet(i => PrepSqlForComparison(i.MyValue) = "hello world. Please ignore the whitespace");

But that doesn't compile since the operator in the expression is an assignment, not an equals.

So if I can't do it that way, how can I verify while ignoring case, white space, and other formatting?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you do not need the functionality of VerifySet (if you only care about the last set value), you could setup the MyValue property in your mock object to simply echo back the last set value by calling:

mockMyInterface.SetupProperty(f => f.MyValue);

Then you could perform a comparision / equality check that ignores the white spaces and line breaks. I created a custom StringComparer to encapsulate this logic in my test:

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using Moq;

namespace MoqVerifySet
{
public interface MyInterface
{
    string MyValue { get; set; }
}

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var mockMyInterface = new Mock<MyInterface>();
        mockMyInterface.SetupProperty(f => f.MyValue);

        MyInterface myI = mockMyInterface.Object;
        myI.MyValue = @"hello 
                        world.
                        Please ignore
                        the whitespace";
        try
        {
            var comparer = new CompareWithoutWhitespace(StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
            Assert.IsTrue(comparer.Equals(myI.MyValue, "hello world. Please ignore the whitespace"));
            Console.WriteLine("Success");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Error : {0}", ex.Message);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("\n\nPress any key to exit...");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

internal class CompareWithoutWhitespace : StringComparer
{
    private readonly StringComparison _stringComparison;

    public CompareWithoutWhitespace(StringComparison stringComparison)
    {
        _stringComparison = stringComparison;
    }

    public override int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        return String.Compare(RemoveWhitespace(x), RemoveWhitespace(y), _stringComparison);
    }

    public override bool Equals(string x, string y)
    {
        return String.Equals(RemoveWhitespace(x), RemoveWhitespace(y), _stringComparison);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(string obj)
    {
        return RemoveWhitespace(obj).GetHashCode();
    }

    private static string RemoveWhitespace(string input)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(input)) return input;
        input = input.Replace(Environment.NewLine, "");
        return input.Replace(" ", "");
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for. +1 –  John MacIntyre Nov 6 '10 at 19:11

Your whitespace problem is nothing to do with Mock, Your myI.MyValue is using a verbatim string literal.

The line:

myI.MyValue = @"hello world.
                Please ignore
                the whitespace";

Notice all the whitespace left of the first letter of the last two lines. Is equivalent to writing:

myI.MyValue = @"hello world.                            Please ignore                            the whitespace";
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