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I have a form:

<form action="/processform">
   <input name="firstname" value="john" />
   <input name="lastname" value="doe" />
</form>

I have a Person object:

public class Person {
   private String firstname;
   private String lastname;
   // ... getters & setters ...
}

I want to receive this data, perform validation on it, and post it to a datastore.

How do I write a controller to do this? I understand that I could pass the parameters in as request parameters, but I think the "proper" way to do this is somehow bind the data from the form to the Person object and then receive that Person object in the controller and call a Validate object that is configured to receive the Person object.

After much reading, this step has confounded me. Can someone show me what is needed to "bind" the data, "validate" (e.g. a validator), and "process" the data (e.g. the controller, and in particular what gets passed to it as parameters)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here was the answer I was looking for, I didn't understand that Spring, by default, will take all of the parameters from the form submission (such as "firstname" and "lastname") and can create the object for you by calling the setter methods of these parameters.

The controller:

@Controller
public class MyFormProcessor {
   @RequestMapping("/formsubmit")
   public String handleForm(@Valid Person person, BindingResult errors, Map<String,Object> model){
      // ...handle form...
   }
}

Spring is essentially doing the following magic before calling handleForm for this request (obviously in a more extendable way than I depict for this simple example):

Person person = new Person();
person.setFirstname( request.getParameter("firstname") );
person.setLastname( request.getParameter("lastname") );
handleForm(person, anErrorsObject, new Model());

For validation you can either create your own validator (which I won't mention anything about here), or if you include Hibernate Validator in the classpath, then you can annotate the Person class (example below) and when you add the @Valid annotation as I depicted in the example above the Hibernate validator will validate the class based on those annotations and post any errors to the error object (a BindingResult object is an extension of Springs' Errors, and for simple examples the Errors object is the interesting component).

JSR-303 validation annotated Person class (for use with the @Valid option):

public class Person {
   @NotNull
   @Size(min=3, max=20)
   private String firstname;

   @NotNull
   @Size(min=3, max=20)
   private String lastname;

   // ... getters & setters ...
}
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Spring has a complete tutorial showing every aspect that you need. It's called "Petclinic". You can check it out from:

git https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-petclinic

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Ok, 2 specific questions that I think I'm not grasping yet: 1) in o.s.s.petclinic.web.FindOwnerForm the the processSubmit method accepts an Owner object. Spring did something to create that object, what did it do? 2) In o.s.s.petclinic.web.AddPetForm the processSubmit() method accepts a ModelAttribute("pet"), I believe I understand that this means that the Entry <"pet", Object> was added to the model before this method was called, but who did that?? –  David Parks Nov 6 '10 at 9:55

I think this is as simple as it gets

http://maestric.com/doc/java/spring/form_validation

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I was looking at this example, nice site with many interesting examples (though many extend classes or implement interfaces and as a new User I'm not clear if those examples are 2.5 based or 3.x based, would be nice if the spring version were called out). In this case in particular it doesn't show a controller implementation and is using the JSP tags to perform data binding (which to my eyes is total magic because I don't yet understand how that data binding really happens). –  David Parks Nov 6 '10 at 9:34

Have a look at the Forms and Validation sections of http://blog.springsource.com/2010/07/22/spring-mvc-3-showcase/

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