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This is what I want to do:

  1. Have a timer with some interval
  2. In the timer callback code, if some condition is met, another thread should be run

I’ve put my code in a class which is instantiated by the main form and the code is executed upon method call (‘StartSync()’, se sample code).

The problem is that the code runs for a couple of seconds but then terminates. I suppose I’m doing something stupid but I really can’t see what it is. Thankful for any help with regards to this.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    class Syncer
    {
        static bool SYNC_IN_PROGRESS;

        public void StartSync()
        {
            SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = false;
            Timer timer = new Timer(timerCallback, null, 0, 1000);
        }

        public void timerCallback(Object stateInfo)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Sync?");

            if (!SYNC_IN_PROGRESS)
            {
                SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = true;

                Thread thSync = new Thread(new ThreadStart(sync));
                thSync.Start();
            }
        }

        void sync()
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Syncing...");
            SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = false;
        }
    }
}
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2  
why not run the code in the timer callback, instead of a new thread? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 6 '10 at 9:22
    
Your thread, as written, will stay alive only for a few microseconds. Hard to diagnose a problem with code that isn't visible. –  Hans Passant Nov 6 '10 at 12:09
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this cleaner approach

    static volatile bool SYNC_IN_PROGRESS; 
    static thread syncPoll; 

    public void StartSync() 
    { 
        SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = false; 
        syncPoll = new Thread(sync);
        syncPoll.Start();
    } 

    void sync() 
    { 
        while (true)
        {
             Debug.WriteLine("Sync?");
             if (SYNC_IN_PROGRESS) Debug.WriteLine("Syncing..."); 
             Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    } 

It does the same you try to do with your current code :) but doesn't use a timer

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this code is cleaner and with some minor additions this solution accomplishes what I want to achieve. I suppose the approach suggested by Mitch (above) would also do the trick, e g dropping the second thread and put all code in the timer callback. I’m still somewhat puzzled though by what’s going on in my original code. –  Rapunsel Nov 6 '10 at 17:20
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At a guess, the Timer is only held in a method variable; it sounds to me like the Timer is getting garbage collected and finalized, hence terminated. I suspect you should hold onto that reference in a field to prevent collection.

As an aside - I doubt it is the cause here, but when dealing with threading you should be religiously aware of access to shared state from multiple threads; for example:

  • using Monitor (aka lock)
  • appropriate use of volatile
  • Interlocked when it fits

Your current access to the static bool will probably work OK, but...

share|improve this answer
    
Nah, the callback keeps it alive. As long as the Syncer object stays referenced anyway. –  Hans Passant Nov 6 '10 at 12:09
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So here is what I did and it seems to work just fine

public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }


        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            StartSync();
        }

        static bool SYNC_IN_PROGRESS;

        public void StartSync()
        {
            SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = false;
            System.Threading.Timer timer = new System.Threading.Timer(timerCallback, SYNC_IN_PROGRESS, 0, 1000); 


        }

        public void timerCallback(Object stateInfo)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Sync?");

            if (!(bool)stateInfo)
            {
                SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = true;

                Thread thSync = new Thread(new ThreadStart(sync));
                thSync.Start();
            }
        }

        void sync()
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Syncing...");
            SYNC_IN_PROGRESS = false;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I’m afraid this code behaves the same way as mine (at least on my machine); it runs for 5-10s and then stops. –  Rapunsel Nov 6 '10 at 17:21
    
Interesting I ran mine for about 5 minutes. The I gave up waiting. lol –  Oakcool Nov 6 '10 at 23:11
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