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I can't seem to get my CSS to link to a div when I use:

[in stylesheet(style.css)]

#sitecontainer .header {
    background-image:url('/images/header-background');
}


<div id="sitecontainer">
        <div id="header"></div>
        <div id="content"></div>
        <div id="footer"></div>
</div>

However when I place the CSS inline in the page it does work. Any ideas?

Pete

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your CSS is using a class selector on header:

.header

rather than.

#header

This would work if you had HTML mark-up like this:

<div id="sitecontainer">
        <div class="header"></div>
        <div class="content"></div>
        <div class="footer"></div>
</div>

But in your case you could use:

#sitecontainer #header

or even better (unless you're doing something very specific in your site with this particular header) you should just cut it down to

#header { /* CSS rules here */ }

For more info - A really good article of the various CSS selection methods is here on NetTuts.

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In my opinion header, content and footer are pretty generic layout elements. they might show up again deeper nested in your page. example: your site has a header, content and footer and in your content maybe you want to show some text document which in itself also has a header, content and footer so semantically I think classes are a better approach. –  Jan Nov 6 '10 at 12:18
    
I tend to agree. With HTML5 header, footer and article are all repeatable elements and so to have similar semantics, classes are the way to go. –  isNaN1247 Nov 6 '10 at 13:02
    
I still prefer to give my primary header and footer the id of header and footer, sub headers and footers can have a class. –  zzzzBov Nov 6 '10 at 17:22

You need a # in both places:

#sitecontainer #header {
  background-image:url('/images/header-background');
}

Make sure your IDs are unique in the page though, or this will cause other issues. If you have multiple headers then do use a class attribute instead:

<div id="sitecontainer">
  <div class="header"></div>
  <div class="content"></div>
  <div class="footer"></div>
</div>

...and use your current CSS with the .header class selector.

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1  
-.- wasn't it just a typo –  Harmen Nov 6 '10 at 11:24
    
@Harmen - It could be, but assuming the obvious isn't the problem will only cause endless headaches, solve the obvious, then see if it's still broken :) The code in the question doesn't work...*never* assume it's "just a typo", many, many, many programming problems are typos. –  Nick Craver Nov 6 '10 at 11:27

Simply use #header - as it is an id, it should already be unique (edit: as long as there aren't other pages where you don't want this to happen and don't hava a sitecontainer).

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3  
While it should be unique in the page, it may not be unique across all pages. For example what if the OP had <div id="othercontainer"><div id="header"></div></div> on another page that shouldn't be styled? –  Nick Craver Nov 6 '10 at 11:25
    
@Nick Craver: Hmm, that's right. I was assuming that he named the container sitecontainer on all pages. –  thejh Nov 6 '10 at 11:33

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