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When I create an executable jar with dependencies (using this guide), all properties files are packaged into that jar too. How to stop it from happening? Thanks.

UPDATE: I tried to exclude them using the Maven resources plugin, but then my application won't find the properties files when I run it in Eclipse (right click on the module -> Run As -> Java Application)

UPDATE: Thanks for your useful answers. I think I'd better spend time to learn Maven, for now I just choose the simplest solution.

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Could you be more precise about these resources? Why do you want to exclude them from the JAR? When do you need them? –  romaintaz Nov 6 '10 at 17:45
    
I want to exclude them because they store the application's configurations –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 6 '10 at 18:22
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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Put those properties files in src/test/resources. Files in src/test/resources are available within Eclipse automatically via eclipse:eclipse but will not be included in the packaged JAR by Maven.

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Thanks a lot for a simple solution. I wish I could accept all answers here. –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 6 '10 at 23:49
13  
This is a bad answer as it is Eclipse specific, relying on an inability for Eclipse to implement separate classpaths for main and test. Other IDEs have separate classpaths, and so your code won't work in those IDEs. Hopefully Eclipse will have separate classpaths at some point too. –  JodaStephen Jul 12 '13 at 21:29
    
Be sure to define build/outputDirectory to be different from Eclipse's default output folder, otherwise a jar built from mvn command line might include stuff Eclipse has put there (eg contents of src/test/resources) –  JasonPlutext Nov 7 '13 at 0:36
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To exclude any file from a jar / target directory you can use the <excludes> tag in your pom.xml file.

In the next example, all files with .properties extension will not be included:

<build>
    <resources>
        <resource>
            <directory>src/main/resources</directory>
            <excludes>
                <exclude>*.properties</exclude>
            </excludes>
            <filtering>false</filtering>
        </resource>
    </resources>
</build>
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1  
This answer (stackoverflow.com/a/3004684/363573) provides, in my opinion, a more elegant way to exclude unwanted resources with maven jar plugin. –  Stephan Apr 12 '12 at 14:21
    
If I am not wrong, there is a problem with this solution, because it exclude these files from all the plugins. How about just excluding them from assembly plugin? I have tried the same configuration inside the configuration tag in the plugin tag, and it doesn't work –  Afshin Moazami Dec 30 '13 at 15:48
    
Awesome comment! Thanks a ton:) –  Mike Jan 27 at 20:49
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Do you mean to property files located in src/main/resources? Then you should exclude them using the maven-resource-plugin. See the following page for details:

http://maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-resources-plugin/examples/include-exclude.html

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But then my application can't find the properties files when I run it in Eclipse (right click on the module -> Run As -> Java Application) –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 6 '10 at 17:17
    
You could add a separate Maven profile for the generation of the executable JAR and exclude the property files on there. –  chkal Nov 6 '10 at 17:52
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By convention, the directory src/main/resources contains the resources that will be used by the application. So Maven will include them in the final JAR.

Thus in your application, you will access them using the getResourceAsStream() method, as the resources are loaded in the classpath.

If you need to have them outside your application, do not store them in src/main/resources as they will be bundled by Maven. Of course, you can exclude them (using the link given by chkal) but it is better to create another directory (for example src/main/external-resources) in order to keep the conventions regarding the src/main/resources directory.

In the latter case, you will have to deliver the resources independently as your JAR file (this can be achieved by using the Assembly plugin). If you need to access them in your Eclipse environment, go to the Properties of your project, then in Java Build Path in Sources tab, add the folder (for example src/main/external-resources). Eclipse will then add this directory in the classpath.

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I think I'm doing things wrong. Perhaps src/main/resources is not a place to put the application's configurations. I have a difficult situation in which I haven't known how to write unit tests yet. –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 7 '10 at 3:16
    
To be OK with conventions, one can use the maven jar plugin. See this answer : stackoverflow.com/a/3004684/363573 –  Stephan Apr 12 '12 at 14:22
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When I create an executable jar with dependencies (using this guide), all properties files are packaged into that jar too. How to stop it from happening? Thanks.

Properties files from where? Your main jar? Dependencies?

In the former case, putting resources under src/test/resources as suggested is probably the most straight forward and simplest option.

In the later case, you'll have to create a custom assembly descriptor with special excludes/exclude in the unpackOptions.

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