Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to figure out how to calculate the Internet Checksum in Java and its causing me no end of pain. (I'm horrible at bit manipulation.) I found a version in C# Calculate an Internet (aka IP, aka RFC791) checksum in C#. However my attempt at converting it to Java does not see to produce the correct results. Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong? I suspect a data type issue.

public long getValue() {
    byte[] buf = { (byte) 0xed, 0x2A, 0x44, 0x10, 0x03, 0x30};
    int length = buf.length;
    int i = 0;

    long sum = 0;
    long data = 0;
    while (length > 1) {
        data = 0;
        data = (((buf[i]) << 8) | ((buf[i + 1]) & 0xFF));

        sum += data;
        if ((sum & 0xFFFF0000) > 0) {
            sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
            sum += 1;
        }

        i += 2;
        length -= 2;
    }

    if (length > 0) {
        sum += (buf[i] << 8);
        // sum += buffer[i];
        if ((sum & 0xFFFF0000) > 0) {
            sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
            sum += 1;
        }
    }
    sum = ~sum;
    sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
    return sum;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Edited to apply comments from @Andy, @EJP, @RD et al and adding extra test cases just to be sure.

I've used a combination of @Andys answer (correctly identifying the location of the problem) and updated the code to include the unit tests provided in the linked answer along with a verified message checksum additional test case.

First the implementation

package org.example.checksum;

public class InternetChecksum {

  /**
   * Calculate the Internet Checksum of a buffer (RFC 1071 - http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1071.html)
   * Algorithm is
   * 1) apply a 16-bit 1's complement sum over all octets (adjacent 8-bit pairs [A,B], final odd length is [A,0])
   * 2) apply 1's complement to this final sum
   *
   * Notes:
   * 1's complement is bitwise NOT of positive value.
   * Ensure that any carry bits are added back to avoid off-by-one errors
   *
   *
   * @param buf The message
   * @return The checksum
   */
  public long calculateChecksum(byte[] buf) {
    int length = buf.length;
    int i = 0;

    long sum = 0;
    long data;

    // Handle all pairs
    while (length > 1) {
      // Corrected to include @Andy's edits and various comments on Stack Overflow
      data = (((buf[i] << 8) & 0xFF00) | ((buf[i + 1]) & 0xFF));
      sum += data;
      // 1's complement carry bit correction in 16-bits (detecting sign extension)
      if ((sum & 0xFFFF0000) > 0) {
        sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
        sum += 1;
      }

      i += 2;
      length -= 2;
    }

    // Handle remaining byte in odd length buffers
    if (length > 0) {
      // Corrected to include @Andy's edits and various comments on Stack Overflow
      sum += (buf[i] << 8 & 0xFF00);
      // 1's complement carry bit correction in 16-bits (detecting sign extension)
      if ((sum & 0xFFFF0000) > 0) {
        sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
        sum += 1;
      }
    }

    // Final 1's complement value correction to 16-bits
    sum = ~sum;
    sum = sum & 0xFFFF;
    return sum;

  }

}

Then the unit test in JUnit4

package org.example.checksum;

import org.junit.Test;

import static junit.framework.Assert.assertEquals;

public class InternetChecksumTest {
  @Test
  public void simplestValidValue() {
    InternetChecksum testObject = new InternetChecksum();

    byte[] buf = new byte[1]; // should work for any-length array of zeros
    long expected = 0xFFFF;

    long actual = testObject.calculateChecksum(buf);

    assertEquals(expected, actual);
  }

  @Test
  public void validSingleByteExtreme() {
    InternetChecksum testObject = new InternetChecksum();

    byte[] buf = new byte[]{(byte) 0xFF};
    long expected = 0xFF;

    long actual = testObject.calculateChecksum(buf);

    assertEquals(expected, actual);
  }

  @Test
  public void validMultiByteExtrema() {
    InternetChecksum testObject = new InternetChecksum();

    byte[] buf = new byte[]{0x00, (byte) 0xFF};
    long expected = 0xFF00;

    long actual = testObject.calculateChecksum(buf);

    assertEquals(expected, actual);
  }

  @Test
  public void validExampleMessage() {
    InternetChecksum testObject = new InternetChecksum();

    // Berkley example http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~kfall/EE122/lec06/tsld023.htm
    // e3 4f 23 96 44 27 99 f3
    byte[] buf = {(byte) 0xe3, 0x4f, 0x23, (byte) 0x96, 0x44, 0x27, (byte) 0x99, (byte) 0xf3};

    long expected = 0x1aff;

    long actual = testObject.calculateChecksum(buf);

    assertEquals(expected, actual);
  }

  @Test
  public void validExampleEvenMessageWithCarryFromRFC1071() {
    InternetChecksum testObject = new InternetChecksum();

    // RFC1071 example http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1071.txt
    // 00 01 f2 03 f4 f5 f6 f7
    byte[] buf = {(byte) 0x00, 0x01, (byte) 0xf2, (byte) 0x03, (byte) 0xf4, (byte) 0xf5, (byte) 0xf6, (byte) 0xf7};

    long expected = 0x220d;

    long actual = testObject.calculateChecksum(buf);

    assertEquals(expected, actual);

  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the additional unit tests. I was getting conflicting answers about whether my code was incorrect due to some bad tests. –  chotchki Nov 6 '10 at 20:40
1  
@chotchki I've edited the answer to include comments from @Andy et al –  Gary Rowe Nov 7 '10 at 9:08
    
Why does calculateChecksum return a long value? UDP, TCP, and IPv4 checksums take two bytes. So int (at most 4 bytes) should be enough –  Maksim Dmitriev May 13 at 19:04
1  
The code was modified from the example in RFC1071 Section 4.1 which used a long as its sum. At the time the RFC was written a long was probably 32 bits. –  Gary Rowe May 13 at 21:13
1  
Much of that was to do with avoiding type promotion in Java. Have a look at the other answers for more details (@Andy is now @Andrey Balaguta) –  Gary Rowe May 14 at 19:24

A much shorter version is the following:

long checksum(byte[] buf, int length) {
    int i = 0;
    long sum = 0;
    while (length > 0) {
        sum += (buf[i++]&0xff) << 8;
        if ((--length)==0) break;
        sum += (buf[i++]&0xff);
        --length;
    }

    return (~((sum & 0xFFFF)+(sum >> 16)))&0xFFFF;
}
share|improve this answer

I think it is type promotion that is causing trouble. Lets look at data = (((buf[i]) << 8) | ((buf[i + 1]) & 0xFF)):

  1. ((buf[i]) << 8) would promote buf[i] to int, causing sign expansion
  2. (buf[i + 1]) & 0xFF would also promote buf[i + 1] to int, causing sign expansion. But masking this argument with 0xff is the right thing - we get correct operand in this case.
  3. The whole expression gets promoted to long (once again, sign included).

The problem lies in the first argument - it should be masked with 0xff00, like that: data = (((buf[i] << 8) & 0xFF00) | ((buf[i + 1]) & 0xFF)). But I suspect there are more efficient algorithms implemented for Java, maybe even standard library has one. You might take a look at MessageDigest, maybe it has one.

share|improve this answer
2  
#2 is incorrect. The literal 0xFF is treated as an int, not a byte. In step #3 you will have a short | int, where the FIRST argument gets promoted, not the second. Therefore the problem is not with 0x00,0xFF as in your example but with 0xFF,0x00 (or any buf[i] > 0x7F). When the first parameter is widened from short to int, it is sign-extended as you explained. In the original program, it is the 0xed, 0x2A case that causes the checksum to be incorrect. –  robert_x44 Nov 6 '10 at 21:30
2  
This post is wildly incorrect. The result of #1, #2, and #3 is an int unless either of the arguments is a long, in which case it is a long. The result of the entire expression is similarly an int and it gets widened to a long when stored in one. The (int) cast is completely unnecessary. –  EJP Nov 6 '10 at 23:04
    
@RD : Honestly, I'm confused how to fix that issue. –  chotchki Nov 7 '10 at 1:24
1  
@EJP, @RD, thanks for your correction, and sorry for misleading. I've corrected post accordingly. –  Andrey Balaguta Nov 7 '10 at 5:29
    
It's sign extension, not 'sign expansion'. –  EJP Nov 7 '10 at 7:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.