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// b: uint32_t array of size n    => 32*n bits
// The bit index, i, is in the range 0 <= i < 32 * n
// The bit in b at bit index 0 is always 0!

unsigned idx_of_first_zero_bit_before_or_at (uint32_t *b, unsigned n, unsigned i) {
    // Returns a bit index, k, such that k <= i and k is the largest bit index
    // for which bit k in b is 0.
}

// As above, value == 0 or 1
void set_bit (uint32_t *b, unsigned n, unsigned i, unsigned value) {
    // Sets bit at bit index i to value.
    // It could be something like (untested):
    if (value)
        b[i >> 5] |=   (1 << (i&31));
    else
        b[i >> 5] &= (~(1 << (i&31)));
}

I'm looking for the most efficient, but still portable (across different targets, but only g++ compiler is used) way to implement these functions (especially the first one). Storage order of the bits (big, little endian or anything else) doesn't matter.

Naive implementation (untested):

uint32_t get_bit (uint32_t *b, unsigned n, unsigned i) {
    return b[i >> 5] & (1 << (i&31));
}

unsigned idx_of_first_zero_bit_before_or_at (uint32_t *b, unsigned n, unsigned i) {
    while (get_bit (b, n, i)) 
        i--;
    return i;
}

Skipping all-1-elements:

unsigned idx_of_first_zero_bit_before_or_at (uint32_t *b, unsigned n, unsigned i) {
    for (unsigned k = i >> 5; ~(b[k]) == 0; i = (--k << 5) + 31);
    while (get_bit (b, n, i)) 
        i--;
    return i;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your untested get_bit seems to check everything (in the relevant 32-bit value) except the bit in question. Just leave out the inversion. :-) For optimization, think about skipping 32-bit values that are all 1's, easily checked by inverting and checking for 0. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 6 '10 at 16:47
    
@Alf: Thanks, tried to add your solution - maybe not as good as possible... –  Thomas Nov 6 '10 at 16:57
2  
GCC has some extensions, __builtin_clz for example, so you can use those if you only need to use GCC. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Other-Builtins.html –  mu is too short Nov 6 '10 at 17:11
    
@mu: I had looked at them, but I couldn't think of a reasonable way to use them for this algorithm (still, that might be possible). –  Thomas Nov 6 '10 at 17:15

3 Answers 3

Depending on how much storage you have available, you can take a lookup-table approach. For instance, if you can spend 256 bytes, then the following function does it for a single uint32_t:

static const int table[256] = { 
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7,
    6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
    6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
    6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
    6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6,
    5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5,
    5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5,
    4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,
    3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 0, 0,
};


int func(uint32_t b, int i)
{
    b = (b << (31-i));

    if ((b & 0xFFFF0000) != 0xFFFF0000)
    {
        return ((b & 0xFF000000) != 0xFF000000)
             ? table[(b >> 24) & 0xFF] + 24 - (31-i)
             : table[(b >> 16) & 0xFF] + 16 - (31-i);
    }
    else
    {
        return ((b & 0xFF00) != 0xFF00)
             ? table[(b >> 8) & 0xFF] + 8 - (31-i)
             : table[(b >> 0) & 0xFF] + 0 - (31-i);
    }
}

I'm sure this can be optimised further. For instance, there are certainly ways to eliminate the expensive conditional branches; you can use the fact that boolean conditions evaluate to either 1 or 0, and use them as multiplicands.

If you have 64kB available, then you do this on 16-bit chunks at a time, and so on. Of course, doing random access on a large table might bring caching effects into play, so you'll need to experiment, and profile.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea! I'll optimize it for my platform and compare. –  Thomas Nov 7 '10 at 2:31
    
@Thomas: Now that you're using the "skip all 0xFFFFFFFFs approach", I suspect that for long enough arrays, your runtime will be dominated by the skipping loop. So it may not be worth the hassle of optimising the above routine... –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 7 '10 at 9:51

You can use binary search to find a zero bit within one uint32. You can also replace the last few steps with a lookup table to balance the LUT's memory footprint against instructions. First, a solution with control flow:

unsigned idx_of_first_zero_bit(uint32_t n) {
  int idx = 0;
  if (n == 0xffffffff) return 32;  // Not found; presumably the common case

  // Binary search
  if (n & 0xffff == 0xffff) {
    n >>= 16;
    idx += 16;
  }
  if (n & 0xff == 0xff) {
    n >>= 8;
    idx += 8;
  }
  if (n & 0xf == 0xf) {
    n >>= 4;
    idx += 4;
  }
  if (n & 0x3 == 0x3) {
    n >>= 2;
    idx += 2;
  }
  if (n & 0x1 == 0x1) {
    n >>= 1;
    idx += 1;
  }
  return idx;
}

To avoid branch mispredictions, you can effect conditional update with bitwise operations.

int shift;

// First step
shift = ((n & 0xffff == 0xffff) << 4); // shift = (n & 0xffff == 0xffff) ? 16 : 0
n >>= shift;
idx += shift;

// Next step
shift = ((n & 0xff == 0xff) << 3); // shift = (n & 0xff == 0xff) ? 8 : 0
n >>= shift;
idx += shift;
share|improve this answer

Usually I try avoiding "random" branches. For example, we can take the solution proposed by Oli Charlesworth, and get rid of the ifs.

It solves most of the calculations with a LUT, but the last part still requires branches. Introduce an additional LUT to deal with it:

unsigned index2 = table[ b        & 0xFF]        |  // Values 0..7, so we use 3 bits
                 (table[(b >>  8) & 0xFF] << 3 ) |  // Next 3 bits..
                 (table[(b >> 16) & 0xFF] << 6 ) |
                 (table[(b >> 24) & 0xFF] << 9 );

Now we have a 12-bit value in index2 that we can transform to a meaningful value with a single table lookup:

return table2[index2]; // char[4096] array with precomputed values.

Also, by using a 16-bit LUT in the first place, we'll end up with two 16-bit lookups and an 8-bit one.

share|improve this answer
    
This should yield a good improvement. Unfortunately, my platform has only 256kB of memory - 4096+256 bytes would already be a lot for this algorithm. –  Thomas Nov 7 '10 at 2:33

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