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Can someone post a simple example of using named pipes in linux?

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Any specific language? –  slashmais Nov 6 '10 at 16:36
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3 Answers

One of the best examples of a practical use of a named pipe...

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netcat

Another useful behavior is using netcat as a proxy. Both ports and hosts can be redirected. Look at this example:

nc -l 12345 | nc www.google.com 80

Port 12345 represents the request This starts a nc server on port 12345 and all the connections get redirected to google.com:80. If a web browser makes a request to nc, the request will be sent to google but the response will not be sent to the web browser. That is because pipes are unidirectional. This can be worked around with a named pipe to redirect the input and output.

mkfifo backpipe
nc -l 12345  0<backpipe | nc www.google.com 80 1>backpipe
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A proxy implemented with a shell one-liner. Nobody told me unix could do this. –  Steven Lu Jul 5 '13 at 15:56
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Open two different shell, and leave them side by side. In both, go to the /tmp/ directory

cd /tmp/

In the first one type:

mkfifo myPipe
echo "IPC_example_between_two_shells">myPipe

In the second one, type:

while read line; do echo "What has been passed through the pipe is ${line}"; done<myPipe

First shell won't give you any prompt back until you execute the second part of the code in the second shell. It's because the fifo read and write is blocking.

You can also have a look at the FIFO type by doing a ls -al myPipe and see the details of this specific type of file.

Next step would be to embark the code in a script ! - Hope it helps.

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Thanks @Nicolas –  nsd Jun 1 '13 at 11:48
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Here are the commands:

$ mkfifo named_pipe

$ echo "Hi" > named_pipe

$ cat named_pipe

The first command creates the pipe.

The second command writes to the pipe (blocking).

The last command reads from the pipe.

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I would change the # to $ so its not all commented (and not run as root!) –  alternative Nov 6 '10 at 16:45
    
It is just to show that this is a shell prompt! –  Khaled Nov 6 '10 at 16:49
    
It's customary for "#" to refer to a root prompt (ie, a prompt in a root shell). There's nothing here that would require running in a root shell. –  thomasrutter Jul 2 '13 at 2:28
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