Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have written the following code which should check if the entered number is a prime number or not, but there is an issue i couldn't get through:

def main():
n = input("Please enter a number:")
is_prime(n)

def is_prime(a):
    x = True 
    for i in (2, a):
            while x:
               if a%i == 0:
                   x = False
               else:
                   x = True


    if x:
        print "prime"
    else:
        print "not prime"

main()

If the entered number is not a prime number, it displays "not prime", as it is supposed to. But if the number is a prime number, it doesn't display anything. Could you please help me with it?

share|improve this question
4  
Note: for i in (2, a) runs the loop exactly twice: once with i == 2, and once with i == a. You probably wanted to use for i in range(2, a). –  Marius Gedminas Nov 6 '10 at 17:46

7 Answers 7

def isPrime(x):
    if x<2:
        return False
    for i in range(2,x):
        if not x%i:
           return False
    return True  

print isPrime(2)
True
print isPrime(3)
True
print isPrime(9)
False

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question at all. And 10 is not a prime so it's incorrect code as well. –  interjay Jul 12 '13 at 22:32
    
The code is correct,it was a typo mistake that. –  Mesut014 Jul 13 '13 at 13:25
    
No, the code isn't correct. It will report 9 and many other numbers as being prime. –  interjay Jul 13 '13 at 13:30
    
Ok. Thanks a lot. –  Mesut014 Jul 13 '13 at 14:37
def is_prime(x):
    n = 2
    if x < n:
        return False
    else:    
        while n < x:
           print n
            if x % n == 0:
                return False
                break
            n = n + 1
        else:
            return True
share|improve this answer
def prime(x):
    # check that number is greater that 1
    if x > 1:
        for i in range(2, x + 1):
            # check that only x and 1 can evenly divide x
            if x % i == 0 and i != x and i != 1:
                return False
        else:
            return True
    else:
        return False # if number is negative
share|improve this answer
import math
def is_prime(n):
    if n == 2:
        return True
    if n%2 == 0 or n <= 1:
        return False
    sqr = int(math.sqrt(n)) + 1
    for divisor in range(3, sqr, 2):
        if n%divisor == 0:
            return False
    return True

This is the most efficient way to see if a number is prime, if you only have a few query. If you ask a lot of numbers if they are prime try Sieve of Eratosthenes .

share|improve this answer
    
Why stop the range at the (sqrt + 1) of the number you are checking? I don't understand why, although I see it works. –  sharpcloud Sep 10 '13 at 18:10
    
Never mind, found it at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primality_test :) –  sharpcloud Sep 10 '13 at 22:04
a = input('inter a number: ')
s = 0
if a == 1:  
    print a, 'is a prime'

else : 

    for i in range (2, a ):

        if a%i == 0:
            print a,' is not a prime number'
            s = 'true'
            break

    if s == 0 : print a,' is a prime number'

it worked with me just fine :D

share|improve this answer
    
1 is not a prime number and 2 is a prime number. Your program does not say so. –  Ionescu Robert Jun 29 '13 at 7:44
    
looks like it's been fixed –  Matt O'Brien Aug 18 at 4:26

There are many efficient ways to test primality (and this isn't one of them). But the loop you wrote can be concisely represented in Python:

def is_prime(a):
    return all(a % i for i in xrange(2, a))

That is, a is prime if all numbers between 2 and a (not inclusive) give non-zero remainder when divided into a.

share|improve this answer
2  
note that is_prime returns True for 0 and 1. However, Wikipedia defines a prime number as "a natural number greater than 1 that has no positive divisors other than 1 and itself." so i changed it to return a > 1 and all(a % i for i in xrange(2, a)) –  moeso Mar 5 at 21:30
1  
just add if x<2: return False –  Oleksandr Hubachov Jun 11 at 7:11
1  
I must also add that testing integers over sqrt(a) rounded up is useless, as all factor pairs cross at the square root. –  user3074620 Jun 19 at 19:46

If a is a prime then the while x: in your code will run forever, since x will remain True.

So why is that while there?

I think you wanted to end the for loop when you found a factor, but didn't know how, so you added that while since it has a condition. So here is how you do it:

def is_prime(a):
    x = True 
    for i in range(2, a):
       if a%i == 0:
           x = False
           break # ends the for loop
       # no else block because it does nothing ...


    if x:
        print "prime"
    else:
        print "not prime"
share|improve this answer
1  
this doesn't work either: a%a==0. Using tighter bounds on i (like, say, (2, sqrt(a)) fixes this. –  rtpg Nov 6 '10 at 17:38
1  
@Dasuraga: a is not in range(a) so that wouldn't happen ... of course sqrt is a better bound but i didnt want to change too much since its a beginner question. –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 6 '10 at 18:42
    
whoops, there wasn't actually a range there. Makes me wonder how the original code was supposed to work ... –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 6 '10 at 18:47
1  
+1 for actually explaining why OPs code doesn't work (i.e. answering the actual question!) rather than just providing a better algorithm like everyone else. –  Ollie Ford Jun 12 at 0:19

protected by Community Aug 14 at 19:38

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.