Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written the following code, which should check if the entered number is a prime number or not, but there is an issue i couldn't get through:

def main():
n = input("Please enter a number:")
is_prime(n)

def is_prime(a):
    x = True 
    for i in (2, a):
            while x:
               if a%i == 0:
                   x = False
               else:
                   x = True


    if x:
        print "prime"
    else:
        print "not prime"

main()

If the entered number is not a prime number, it displays "not prime", as it is supposed to, but if the number is a prime number, it doesn't display anything. Could you please help me with it?

share|improve this question
5  
Note: for i in (2, a) runs the loop exactly twice: once with i == 2, and once with i == a. You probably wanted to use for i in range(2, a). –  Marius Gedminas Nov 6 '10 at 17:46

8 Answers 8

If a is a prime then the while x: in your code will run forever, since x will remain True.

So why is that while there?

I think you wanted to end the for loop when you found a factor, but didn't know how, so you added that while since it has a condition. So here is how you do it:

def is_prime(a):
    x = True 
    for i in range(2, a):
       if a%i == 0:
           x = False
           break # ends the for loop
       # no else block because it does nothing ...


    if x:
        print "prime"
    else:
        print "not prime"
share|improve this answer
1  
this doesn't work either: a%a==0. Using tighter bounds on i (like, say, (2, sqrt(a)) fixes this. –  rtpg Nov 6 '10 at 17:38
1  
@Dasuraga: a is not in range(a) so that wouldn't happen ... of course sqrt is a better bound but i didnt want to change too much since its a beginner question. –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 6 '10 at 18:42
    
whoops, there wasn't actually a range there. Makes me wonder how the original code was supposed to work ... –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 6 '10 at 18:47
1  
+1 for actually explaining why OPs code doesn't work (i.e. answering the actual question!) rather than just providing a better algorithm like everyone else. –  Ollie Ford Jun 12 '14 at 0:19

There are many efficient ways to test primality (and this isn't one of them). But the loop you wrote can be concisely represented in Python:

def is_prime(a):
    return all(a % i for i in xrange(2, a))

That is, a is prime if all numbers between 2 and a (not inclusive) give non-zero remainder when divided into a.

share|improve this answer
3  
note that is_prime returns True for 0 and 1. However, Wikipedia defines a prime number as "a natural number greater than 1 that has no positive divisors other than 1 and itself." so i changed it to return a > 1 and all(a % i for i in xrange(2, a)) –  moeso Mar 5 '14 at 21:30
1  
just add if x<2: return False –  Oleksandr Hubachov Jun 11 '14 at 7:11
1  
I must also add that testing integers over sqrt(a) rounded up is useless, as all factor pairs cross at the square root. –  user3074620 Jun 19 '14 at 19:46
    
Actually this is going to make a lot of useless comparisons: checking in xrange(2, math.sqrt(a)) is enough. Plus, xrange() will raise OverflowError for numbers bigger than C longs, so it's better to use itertools.count and itertools.islice. –  Marco Bonelli Jan 14 at 14:38
a = input('inter a number: ')
s = 0
if a == 1:  
    print a, 'is a prime'

else : 

    for i in range (2, a ):

        if a%i == 0:
            print a,' is not a prime number'
            s = 'true'
            break

    if s == 0 : print a,' is a prime number'

it worked with me just fine :D

share|improve this answer
    
1 is not a prime number and 2 is a prime number. Your program does not say so. –  Ionescu Robert Jun 29 '13 at 7:44
    
looks like it's been fixed –  Matt O'Brien Aug 18 '14 at 4:26
import math
def is_prime(n):
    if n == 2:
        return True
    if n%2 == 0 or n <= 1:
        return False
    sqr = int(math.sqrt(n)) + 1
    for divisor in range(3, sqr, 2):
        if n%divisor == 0:
            return False
    return True

This is the most efficient way to see if a number is prime, if you only have a few query. If you ask a lot of numbers if they are prime try Sieve of Eratosthenes.

share|improve this answer
    
Why stop the range at the (sqrt + 1) of the number you are checking? I don't understand why, although I see it works. –  pyrocumulus Sep 10 '13 at 18:10
    
Never mind, found it at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primality_test :) –  pyrocumulus Sep 10 '13 at 22:04
def isPrime(x):
    if x<2:
        return False
    for i in range(2,x):
        if not x%i:
           return False
    return True  

print isPrime(2)
True
print isPrime(3)
True
print isPrime(9)
False

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question at all. And 10 is not a prime so it's incorrect code as well. –  interjay Jul 12 '13 at 22:32
    
The code is correct,it was a typo mistake that. –  Mesut014 Jul 13 '13 at 13:25
    
No, the code isn't correct. It will report 9 and many other numbers as being prime. –  interjay Jul 13 '13 at 13:30
    
Ok. Thanks a lot. –  Mesut014 Jul 13 '13 at 14:37
def prime(x):
    # check that number is greater that 1
    if x > 1:
        for i in range(2, x + 1):
            # check that only x and 1 can evenly divide x
            if x % i == 0 and i != x and i != 1:
                return False
        else:
            return True
    else:
        return False # if number is negative
share|improve this answer
def is_prime(x):
    n = 2
    if x < n:
        return False
    else:    
        while n < x:
           print n
            if x % n == 0:
                return False
                break
            n = n + 1
        else:
            return True
share|improve this answer

Best primality check Python solution

Actually, the best solution has not already been found in these answers, so I'm gonna post it, and explain why this is the best one.

from math import sqrt; from itertools import count, islice

def isPrime(n):
    if n < 2: return False
    return all(n%i for i in islice(count(2), int(sqrt(n)-1)))

Note: the if n < 2 check is needed since that 1 is proved not to be a prime number, and so is zero and any negative number.


Why is this the best solution?

I'm gonna give you some insides about that almost esoteric single line of code that will check for prime numbers:

  • First of all, using range() is really a bad idea, because it will create a list of numbers, which uses a lot of memory. Using xrange() is better, because it creates a generator, which doesn't use any memory to work, but generates every number on-the-fly. By the way, this is not the best solution at all: trying to call xrange(n) for some n such that n > 231-1 (which is the maximum value for a C long) raises OverflowError. Therefore the best way to create a range generator is to use itertools:

    xrange(2147483647+1) # OverflowError
    
    from itertools import count, islice
    
    count(1)                        # Count from 1 to infinity with step=+1
    islice(count(1), 2147483648)    # Count from 1 to 2^31 with step=+1
    islice(count(1, 3), 2147483648) # Count from 1 to 3*2^31 with step=+3
    
  • You do not actually need to go all the way up to n if you want to check if n is a prime number. You can dramatically reduce the tests and only check from 2 to √(n) (square root of n). Here is why:

    • Let's find all the divisors of n = 100, and list them in a table:

       2  x  50 = 100
       4  x  25 = 100
       5  x  20 = 100
      10  x  10 = 100 -> Square root of 100
      20  x  5  = 100     
      25  x  4  = 100
      50  x  2  = 100
      

    You will easily notice that, after the square root of n, all the divisors we find were actually already found. For example 20 was already found doing 100/5. The square root of a number is the exact mid-line where the divisors we found begin being duplicated. Therefore, to check if a number is prime, you'll only need to check from 2 to sqrt(n).

  • Why sqrt(n)-1 then, and not just sqrt(n)? That's because the second argument provided to itertools.islice object is the number of iterations to execute. islice(count(a), b) stops after b iterations. That's the reason why:

    for number in islice(count(10), 2):
        print number,
    
    # Will print: 10 11
    
    for number in islice(count(1, 3), 10):
        print number,
    
    # Will print: 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28
    
  • The function all(...) is the same of the following:

    def all(iterable):
        for element in iterable:
            if not element:
                return False
        return True
    

    it literally checks for all the numbers in the iterable, returning False when a number evaluates to False (which means only if the number is zero). Why do we use it then? First of all, we don't need to use an additional index variable (like we would do using a loop), other than that: just for concision, there's no real need of it, but it looks way less bulky to work with only a single line of code instead of several nested lines.

Extended version

I'm including an "unpacked" version of the isPrime() function, to make it easier to understand and read it:

from math import sqrt
from itertools import count, islice

def isPrime(n):
    if n < 2: return False
    for number in islice(count(2), int(sqrt(n)-1)):
        if not n%number:
            return False
    return True
share|improve this answer

protected by Community Aug 14 '14 at 19:38

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.