Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing an Android application for accessing some battle.net (https://eu.battle.net) account data (for World of Warcraft) and I'm using the org.apache.http.client.HttpClient to do so.

This is the code I'm using:

 public static final String USER_AGENT = "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2.8) Gecko/20100722 Firefox/3.6.8 (.NET CLR 3.5.30729)";

  public static class MyHttpClient extends DefaultHttpClient {

    final Context context;

    public MyHttpClient(Context context) {
      super();
      this.context = context;
    }

    @Override
    protected ClientConnectionManager createClientConnectionManager() {
      SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
      registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
      // Register for port 443 our SSLSocketFactory with our keystore
      // to the ConnectionManager
      registry.register(new Scheme("https", newSslSocketFactory(), 443));
      return new SingleClientConnManager(getParams(), registry);
    }

    private SSLSocketFactory newSslSocketFactory() {
      try {
        // Get an instance of the Bouncy Castle KeyStore format
        KeyStore trusted = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
        // Get the raw resource, which contains the keystore with
        // your trusted certificates (root and any intermediate certs)
        InputStream in = context.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.battlenetkeystore);
        try {
          // Initialize the keystore with the provided trusted certificates
          // Also provide the password of the keystore
          trusted.load(in, "mysecret".toCharArray());
        } finally {
          in.close();
        }
        // Pass the keystore to the SSLSocketFactory. The factory is responsible
        // for the verification of the server certificate.
        SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(trusted);
        // Hostname verification from certificate
        // http://hc.apache.org/httpcomponents-client-ga/tutorial/html/connmgmt.html#d4e506
        sf.setHostnameVerifier(SSLSocketFactory.STRICT_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
        return sf;
      } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new AssertionError(e);
      }
    }
  }

  private static void maybeCreateHttpClient(Context context) {
    if (mHttpClient == null) {
      mHttpClient = new MyHttpClient(context);

      final HttpParams params = mHttpClient.getParams();
      HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(params, REGISTRATION_TIMEOUT);
      HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(params, REGISTRATION_TIMEOUT);
      ConnManagerParams.setTimeout(params, REGISTRATION_TIMEOUT);
      Log.d(TAG, LEAVE + "maybeCreateHttpClient()");
    }
  }

public static boolean authenticate(String username, String password, Handler handler,
      final Context context) {

    final HttpResponse resp;

    final ArrayList<NameValuePair> params = new ArrayList<NameValuePair>();
    params.add(new BasicNameValuePair(PARAM_USERNAME, username));
    params.add(new BasicNameValuePair(PARAM_PASSWORD, password));

    HttpEntity entity = null;
    try {
      entity = new UrlEncodedFormEntity(params);
    } catch (final UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
      // this should never happen.
      throw new AssertionError(e);
    }

    final HttpPost post = new HttpPost(THE_URL);
    post.addHeader(entity.getContentType());
    post.addHeader("User-Agent", USER_AGENT);
    post.setEntity(entity);

    maybeCreateHttpClient(context);

    if (mHttpClient == null) {
      return false;
    }

    try {
      resp = mHttpClient.execute(post);
    } catch (final IOException e) {
      Log.e(TAG, "IOException while authenticating", e);
      return false;
    } finally {
    }
}

The keystore is retrieved (by OpenSSL) like this:

openssl s_client -connect eu.battle.net:443 -showcerts

I have compared the certificates that command produced (http://vipsaran.webs.com/openssl_output.txt) with ones I exported from Firefox (http://vipsaran.webs.com/Firefox_output.zip) and they are the same.

By following advice on this blog, I have setup the above code and imported the (root and intermediate) certs to a keystore (battlenetkeystore.bks) which is used for HttpClient.

This are the commands I used for importing the certs to the keystore:

keytool -importcert -v -file ~/lib/ThawteSSLCA.crt -alias thawtesslca -keystore ~/lib/battlenetkeystore.bks -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -providerpath ~/lib/bcprov-jdk16-145.jar -storetype BKS -storepass mysecret -keypass mysecret -keyalg "RSA" -sigalg "SHA1withRSA"
keytool -importcert -v -file ~/lib/thawtePrimaryRootCA.crt -alias thawteprimaryrootca -keystore ~/lib/battlenetkeystore.bks -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -providerpath ~/lib/bcprov-jdk16-145.jar -storetype BKS -storepass mysecret -keypass mysecret -keyalg "RSA" -sigalg "SHA1withRSA"

Btw. I have also tried keytool -import without the -keyalg "RSA" -sigalg "SHA1withRSA", but with no change.

The problem is that I'm getting this error:

javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Not trusted server certificate
    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.startHandshake(OpenSSLSocketImpl.java:371)
    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AbstractVerifier.verify(AbstractVerifier.java:92)
    at org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.createSocket(SSLSocketFactory.java:381)
    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.DefaultClientConnectionOperator.openConnection(DefaultClientConnectionOperator.java:164)
    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPoolEntry.open(AbstractPoolEntry.java:164)
    at org.apache.http.impl.conn.AbstractPooledConnAdapter.open(AbstractPooledConnAdapter.java:119)
    at org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultRequestDirector.execute(DefaultRequestDirector.java:348)
    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:555)
    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:487)
    at org.apache.http.impl.client.AbstractHttpClient.execute(AbstractHttpClient.java:465)
    at org.homedns.saran.android.wowcalendarsync.network.NetworkUtilities.authenticateWithPass(NetworkUtilities.java:346)
    at org.homedns.saran.android.wowcalendarsync.network.NetworkUtilities$1.run(NetworkUtilities.java:166)
    at org.homedns.saran.android.wowcalendarsync.network.NetworkUtilities$5.run(NetworkUtilities.java:278)
Caused by: java.security.cert.CertificateException: java.security.cert.CertPathValidatorException: IssuerName(CN=thawte Primary Root CA, OU="(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only", OU=Certification Services Division, O="thawte, Inc.", C=US) does not match SubjectName(CN=Thawte SSL CA, O="Thawte, Inc.", C=US) of signing certificate
    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.TrustManagerImpl.checkServerTrusted(TrustManagerImpl.java:168)
    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.startHandshake(OpenSSLSocketImpl.java:366)
    ... 12 more
Caused by: java.security.cert.CertPathValidatorException: IssuerName(CN=thawte Primary Root CA, OU="(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only", OU=Certification Services Division, O="thawte, Inc.", C=US) does not match SubjectName(CN=Thawte SSL CA, O="Thawte, Inc.", C=US) of signing certificate
    at org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.PKIXCertPathValidatorSpi.engineValidate(PKIXCertPathValidatorSpi.java:373)
    at java.security.cert.CertPathValidator.validate(CertPathValidator.java:202)
    at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.TrustManagerImpl.checkServerTrusted(TrustManagerImpl.java:164)
    ... 13 more

and I can't figure a way to solve it. Tried importing the certs into the keystore in different order, aso. but nothing worked.

Please help (and please focus on the solutions based on the Android's Apache HttpClient only).

share|improve this question
    
+1 Definitely an interesting question but, I'm kinda wondering about the legality of it. –  Terrance Dec 9 '10 at 17:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 49 down vote accepted

I expect you've got your own solution by now, but if not:

By combining insights from

I managed to achieve a secure connection to https://eu.battle.net/login/en/login.xml with just the following classes. Note that there is no need to build a keystore since the root CA is trusted by android - the problem is simply that the certs are returned in the wrong order.

(Disclaimer: Didn't spend any time cleaning the code up though.)

EasyX509TrustManager:

package com.trustit.trustme;
import java.security.KeyStore;
import java.security.KeyStoreException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;
import java.util.Date;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManagerFactory;
import javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager;

public class EasyX509TrustManager implements X509TrustManager 
{  
    private X509TrustManager standardTrustManager = null;  

    /** 
     * Constructor for EasyX509TrustManager. 
     */  
    public EasyX509TrustManager(KeyStore keystore) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyStoreException 
    {  
      super();  
      TrustManagerFactory factory = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());  
      factory.init(keystore);  
      TrustManager[] trustmanagers = factory.getTrustManagers();  
      if (trustmanagers.length == 0) 
      {  
        throw new NoSuchAlgorithmException("no trust manager found");  
      }  
      this.standardTrustManager = (X509TrustManager) trustmanagers[0];  
    }  

    /** 
     * @see javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager#checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[],String authType) 
     */  
    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] certificates, String authType) throws CertificateException 
    {  
      standardTrustManager.checkClientTrusted(certificates, authType);  
    }  

    /** 
     * @see javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager#checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[],String authType) 
     */  
    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] certificates, String authType) throws CertificateException 
    {  
    // Clean up the certificates chain and build a new one.
        // Theoretically, we shouldn't have to do this, but various web servers
        // in practice are mis-configured to have out-of-order certificates or
        // expired self-issued root certificate.
        int chainLength = certificates.length;
        if (certificates.length > 1) 
        {
          // 1. we clean the received certificates chain.
          // We start from the end-entity certificate, tracing down by matching
          // the "issuer" field and "subject" field until we can't continue.
          // This helps when the certificates are out of order or
          // some certificates are not related to the site.
          int currIndex;
          for (currIndex = 0; currIndex < certificates.length; ++currIndex) 
          {
            boolean foundNext = false;
            for (int nextIndex = currIndex + 1;
                           nextIndex < certificates.length;
                           ++nextIndex) 
            {
              if (certificates[currIndex].getIssuerDN().equals(
                            certificates[nextIndex].getSubjectDN())) 
              {
                foundNext = true;
                // Exchange certificates so that 0 through currIndex + 1 are in proper order
                if (nextIndex != currIndex + 1) 
                {
                  X509Certificate tempCertificate = certificates[nextIndex];
                  certificates[nextIndex] = certificates[currIndex + 1];
                  certificates[currIndex + 1] = tempCertificate;
                }
                break;
            }
            }
            if (!foundNext) break;
      }

          // 2. we exam if the last traced certificate is self issued and it is expired.
          // If so, we drop it and pass the rest to checkServerTrusted(), hoping we might
          // have a similar but unexpired trusted root.
          chainLength = currIndex + 1;
          X509Certificate lastCertificate = certificates[chainLength - 1];
          Date now = new Date();
          if (lastCertificate.getSubjectDN().equals(lastCertificate.getIssuerDN())
                  && now.after(lastCertificate.getNotAfter())) 
          {
            --chainLength;
          }
      } 

    standardTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(certificates, authType);    
    }  

    /** 
     * @see javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager#getAcceptedIssuers() 
     */  
    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() 
    {  
      return this.standardTrustManager.getAcceptedIssuers();  
    }    
}  

EasySSLSocketFactory

package com.trustit.trustme;

import java.io.IOException;  
import java.net.InetAddress;  
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;  
import java.net.Socket;  
import java.net.UnknownHostException;  

import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;  
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSocket;  
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;  

import org.apache.http.conn.ConnectTimeoutException;  
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.LayeredSocketFactory;  
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SocketFactory;  
import org.apache.http.params.HttpConnectionParams;  
import org.apache.http.params.HttpParams;  

public class EasySSLSocketFactory implements SocketFactory, LayeredSocketFactory 
{  
    private SSLContext sslcontext = null;  

    private static SSLContext createEasySSLContext() throws IOException 
    {  
      try
      {  
        SSLContext context = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");  
        context.init(null, new TrustManager[] { new EasyX509TrustManager(null) }, null);  
        return context;  
      }
      catch (Exception e) 
      {  
        throw new IOException(e.getMessage());  
      }  
    }  

    private SSLContext getSSLContext() throws IOException 
    {  
      if (this.sslcontext == null) 
      {  
        this.sslcontext = createEasySSLContext();  
      }  
      return this.sslcontext;  
    }  

    /** 
     * @see org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SocketFactory#connectSocket(java.net.Socket, java.lang.String, int, 
     *      java.net.InetAddress, int, org.apache.http.params.HttpParams) 
     */  
    public Socket connectSocket(Socket sock,
                                    String host,
                                    int port, 
                                    InetAddress localAddress,
                                    int localPort,
                                    HttpParams params) 

                throws IOException, UnknownHostException, ConnectTimeoutException 
    {  
      int connTimeout = HttpConnectionParams.getConnectionTimeout(params);  
      int soTimeout = HttpConnectionParams.getSoTimeout(params);  
      InetSocketAddress remoteAddress = new InetSocketAddress(host, port);  
      SSLSocket sslsock = (SSLSocket) ((sock != null) ? sock : createSocket());  

      if ((localAddress != null) || (localPort > 0)) 
      {  
        // we need to bind explicitly  
        if (localPort < 0) 
        {  
          localPort = 0; // indicates "any"  
        }  
        InetSocketAddress isa = new InetSocketAddress(localAddress, localPort);  
        sslsock.bind(isa);  
      }  

      sslsock.connect(remoteAddress, connTimeout);  
      sslsock.setSoTimeout(soTimeout);  
      return sslsock;    
    }  

    /** 
     * @see org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SocketFactory#createSocket() 
     */  
    public Socket createSocket() throws IOException {  
        return getSSLContext().getSocketFactory().createSocket();  
    }  

    /** 
     * @see org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SocketFactory#isSecure(java.net.Socket) 
     */  
    public boolean isSecure(Socket socket) throws IllegalArgumentException {  
        return true;  
    }  

    /** 
     * @see org.apache.http.conn.scheme.LayeredSocketFactory#createSocket(java.net.Socket, java.lang.String, int, 
     *      boolean) 
     */  
    public Socket createSocket(Socket socket,
                                   String host, 
                                   int port,
                                   boolean autoClose) throws IOException,  
                                                             UnknownHostException 
    {  
      return getSSLContext().getSocketFactory().createSocket(socket, host, port, autoClose);  
    }  

    // -------------------------------------------------------------------  
    // javadoc in org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SocketFactory says :  
    // Both Object.equals() and Object.hashCode() must be overridden  
    // for the correct operation of some connection managers  
    // -------------------------------------------------------------------  

    public boolean equals(Object obj) {  
        return ((obj != null) && obj.getClass().equals(EasySSLSocketFactory.class));  
    }  

    public int hashCode() {  
        return EasySSLSocketFactory.class.hashCode();  
    }  
}

MyHttpClient

package com.trustit.trustme;

import org.apache.http.conn.ClientConnectionManager;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.PlainSocketFactory;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.Scheme;
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.SchemeRegistry;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient;
import org.apache.http.impl.conn.SingleClientConnManager;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpParams;

import android.content.Context;

public class MyHttpClient extends DefaultHttpClient 
{    
  final Context context;

  public MyHttpClient(HttpParams hparms, Context context)
  {
    super(hparms);
    this.context = context;     
  }

  @Override
  protected ClientConnectionManager createClientConnectionManager() {
    SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();
    registry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));

    // Register for port 443 our SSLSocketFactory with our keystore
    // to the ConnectionManager
    registry.register(new Scheme("https", new EasySSLSocketFactory(), 443));

    //http://blog.synyx.de/2010/06/android-and-self-signed-ssl-certificates/
    return new SingleClientConnManager(getParams(), registry);
  }
}

TrustMe (activity)

package com.trustit.trustme;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

import org.apache.http.HttpResponse;
import org.apache.http.client.ClientProtocolException;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpGet;
import org.apache.http.params.BasicHttpParams;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpConnectionParams;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpParams;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.widget.TextView;

public class TrustMe extends Activity {
    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        TextView tv = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.tv1);


        HttpParams httpParameters = new BasicHttpParams();
        // Set the timeout in milliseconds until a connection is established.
        int timeoutConnection = 10000;
        HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(httpParameters, timeoutConnection);
        // Set the default socket timeout (SO_TIMEOUT) 
        // in milliseconds which is the timeout for waiting for data.
        int timeoutSocket = 10000;
        HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(httpParameters, timeoutSocket);

        // Instantiate the custom HttpClient
        HttpClient client = new MyHttpClient(httpParameters,
                                             getApplicationContext());
      HttpGet request = new HttpGet("https://eu.battle.net/login/en/login.xml"); 

        BufferedReader in = null;
        try 
        {
        HttpResponse response = client.execute(request);
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(response.getEntity().getContent()));

        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer("");
        String line = "";
        String NL = System.getProperty("line.separator");
        while ((line = in.readLine()) != null)
        {
          sb.append(line + NL);
        }
        in.close();
        String page = sb.toString();
        //System.out.println(page);

        tv.setText(page);
            }
        catch (ClientProtocolException e) 
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        catch (IOException e) 
        {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        finally
        {
        if (in != null) 
        {
          try
          {
            in.close();
          }
          catch (IOException e) 
          {
            e.printStackTrace();
          }
        }                       
        }
    }      
}
share|improve this answer
    
You've done it! :) What I've been missing is the sorting of the certificate chain. Thanks for the solution -- simple, yet effective! –  Saran Jul 10 '11 at 16:44
    
Suppose i want to do https auth inside my own webview ,can i follow this method ? –  Alok Kulkarni Apr 2 '12 at 11:51
5  
I got an error: "Trust anchor for certification path not found." –  Felipe Micaroni Lalli Mar 8 '13 at 4:42
    
@FelipeMicaroniLalli did u find a solution....? –  uLYsseus Feb 21 at 14:48
    
No............. –  Felipe Micaroni Lalli Feb 21 at 16:39

Looking at "openssl s_client -connect eu.battle.net:443", I see the following cert chain:

Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=Irvine/O=Blizzard Entertainment, Inc./CN=*.battle.net
   i:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
 1 s:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
   i:/C=ZA/ST=Western Cape/L=Cape Town/O=Thawte Consulting cc/OU=Certification Services Division/CN=Thawte Premium Server CA/emailAddress=premium-server@thawte.com
 2 s:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
   i:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA

Note that is out of order. the issuer of cert "n" in the chain should match the subject of cert "n+1". The issuer of the last cert should be be self signed (subject==issuer) and technically not included.

The correct chain would be ordered like this:

Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=Irvine/O=Blizzard Entertainment, Inc./CN=*.battle.net
   i:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
 1 s:/C=US/O=Thawte, Inc./CN=Thawte SSL CA
   i:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
 2 s:/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
   i:/C=ZA/ST=Western Cape/L=Cape Town/O=Thawte Consulting cc/OU=Certification Services Division/CN=Thawte Premium Server CA/emailAddress=premium-server@thawte.com

The Android browser copes with out of order chain by have its android.net.http.CertificateChainValidator code reorder the cert chain before passing it for validation.

 136         // Clean up the certificates chain and build a new one.
 137         // Theoretically, we shouldn't have to do this, but various web servers
 138         // in practice are mis-configured to have out-of-order certificates or
 139         // expired self-issued root certificate.
 140         int chainLength = serverCertificates.length;
 141         if (serverCertificates.length > 1) {
 142           // 1. we clean the received certificates chain.
 143           // We start from the end-entity certificate, tracing down by matching
 144           // the "issuer" field and "subject" field until we can't continue.
 145           // This helps when the certificates are out of order or
 146           // some certificates are not related to the site.
 147           int currIndex;
 148           for (currIndex = 0; currIndex < serverCertificates.length; ++currIndex) {
 149             boolean foundNext = false;
 150             for (int nextIndex = currIndex + 1;
 151                  nextIndex < serverCertificates.length;
 152                  ++nextIndex) {
 153               if (serverCertificates[currIndex].getIssuerDN().equals(
 154                   serverCertificates[nextIndex].getSubjectDN())) {
 155                 foundNext = true;
 156                 // Exchange certificates so that 0 through currIndex + 1 are in proper order
 157                 if (nextIndex != currIndex + 1) {
 158                   X509Certificate tempCertificate = serverCertificates[nextIndex];
 159                   serverCertificates[nextIndex] = serverCertificates[currIndex + 1];
 160                   serverCertificates[currIndex + 1] = tempCertificate;
 161                 }
 162                 break;
 163               }
 164             }
 165             if (!foundNext) break;
 166           }
 167 
 168           // 2. we exam if the last traced certificate is self issued and it is expired.
 169           // If so, we drop it and pass the rest to checkServerTrusted(), hoping we might
 170           // have a similar but unexpired trusted root.
 171           chainLength = currIndex + 1;
 172           X509Certificate lastCertificate = serverCertificates[chainLength - 1];
 173           Date now = new Date();
 174           if (lastCertificate.getSubjectDN().equals(lastCertificate.getIssuerDN())
 175               && now.after(lastCertificate.getNotAfter())) {
 176             --chainLength;
 177           }
 178         }

To deal with this in your own app, you want to create your own javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory from an SSLContext that was initialized with a X509TrustManager that reorders the chain before calling the default TrustManagerFactory provided TrustManager.

I haven't recently looked at the Apache HTTP Client code to see how to provide your custom javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory to their SSLSocketFactory wrapper, but it should be possible (or just don't use Apache HTTP Client and just use new URL("https://..").openConnection() which allows you to specify the custom javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory on the HttpsURLConnection.

Finally, note that you should only need to import the self-signed root CA into your keystore (and only if its not already in the system store, but I just checked and this CA is not present in froyo). The CA you want in this case has subject:

/C=US/O=thawte, Inc./OU=Certification Services Division/OU=(c) 2006 thawte, Inc. - For authorized use only/CN=thawte Primary Root CA
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed analysis and the hints. Overriding of the order I won't go into (as I think I would have to override many classes to get there). The way with my own SSLSocketFactory (as even described in HttpClient doc: bit.ly/9HefD6) does not work in Android (as it has its own implementation of SSLSocketFactory which only accepts KeyStore as a parameter for the constructor). –  Saran Nov 19 '10 at 17:26
    
Don't know if it's too much to ask, but considering you have already gone deep into cert chain, you can try creating your chain (from eu.battle.net) and using it in this test activity: vipsaran.webs.com/TestTrusted.java –  Saran Nov 19 '10 at 17:29
    
Regarding the HttpsURLConnection route. Well, connecting worked (as I used own HostnameVerifier), but I got stuck with request forwarding and wanted to make it work with apache client as that route seemed much less manual (plus it worked before). –  Saran Nov 19 '10 at 17:32
    
Getting so frustrated with this problem that I'm really starting to consider putting out monetary reward for the solution >< Argh! –  Saran Nov 19 '10 at 17:34
    
I'm late to this party, but bdc, you saved my ass today. Thank you! –  Sid Mar 7 '12 at 0:07

I guess your problem is solved right now, but I had the same one and I also struggled some time to find the correct solution. Maybe it helps someone.

I've also used the code from Antoine's Blog but I changed the constructor used for the SSLSocketFactory.

So I use

SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(certStore, "some_password", trustStore);

therefor i created two KeyStores

KeyStore trustStore = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
KeyStore certStore = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
InputStream in = context.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.signature_certstore);
try {
    certStore.load(in, "some_password".toCharArray());
} finally {
    in.close();
}

in = context.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.signature_truststore);
try {
    trustStore.load(in, "some_password".toCharArray());
} finally {
    in.close();
}

I created the BKS Stores with Portecle. In the signature_truststore.bks I imported the root Certificate and in the signature_certstore.bks you have to import one or more intermediate certificates.

The rest of the code is exactly the same as the one from the blog.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort but this procedure also produces "Signature was not verified." exception for me. If you feel curious, you can try connecting to this url (just use certs i attached or retreive them by openssl s_client -connect eu.battle.net:443 -showcerts). –  Saran Apr 30 '11 at 12:18

I don't have a solution to fix the path. But I have a solution to ignore certs. I use this method to ignore self signed certs in development. See if it helps.

 protected final static ClientConnectionManager clientConnectionManager;
    protected final static HttpParams params;
    // ......
    SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("http", PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("https", new EasySSLSocketFactory(), 443));
    params = new BasicHttpParams();
    params.setParameter(ConnManagerPNames.MAX_TOTAL_CONNECTIONS, 1);
    params.setParameter(ConnManagerPNames.MAX_CONNECTIONS_PER_ROUTE, new ConnPerRouteBean(1));
    params.setParameter(HttpProtocolParams.USE_EXPECT_CONTINUE, false);
    HttpProtocolParams.setUserAgent(params, "android-client-v1.0");
    HttpProtocolParams.setVersion(params, HttpVersion.HTTP_1_1);
    HttpProtocolParams.setContentCharset(params, "utf8");
    clientConnectionManager = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, schemeRegistry);
    // and later do this
    HttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(clientConnectionManager, params);
    HttpGet request = new HttpGet(uri);
    HttpResponse response = client.execute(request);
share|improve this answer
    
Ok...but, I'm affraid an important part is missing -- the source for EasySSLSocketFactory class :) Could you attach it, please? –  Saran Nov 6 '10 at 22:13
    
Oops. I actually googled it before so I forgot. code.google.com/p/transdroid/source/browse/trunk/src/org/xmlrpc/… –  Amir Raminfar Nov 6 '10 at 22:16
    
Thanks. And the EasyX509TrustManager class? :) I guess, the one from the same package (from that trunk) should do the job ;) –  Saran Nov 6 '10 at 22:32
    
Doesn't work, I'm affraid... java.io.IOException: SSL handshake failure: I/O error during system call, Broken pipe at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.nativeconnect(Native Method) at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.startHandshake(OpenSSLSo‌​cketImpl.java:316) at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl$SSLInputStream.<init>(Op‌​enSSLSocketImpl.java:520) at org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.OpenSSLSocketImpl.getInputStream(OpenSSLSo‌​cketImpl.java:461) –  Saran Nov 6 '10 at 22:50
    
i am fresh out of ideas then :( –  Amir Raminfar Nov 7 '10 at 0:33

this may help: http://blog.antoine.li/index.php/2010/10/android-trusting-ssl-certificates/ , Do u have trusted certificates from a CA (like versign or Geotrust)? or you are using self signed certificate... i was facing similar problem and solved it today...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. Yes, I'm aware of that blog (and I also mentioned that in my post: "By following advice on this blog, I have setup..."). Unfortunately the author also did not succeed to successfully connect :( My comments on that blog are under name "Saran". Just try using his or any other code to open this page with Android's Apache HttpClient: eu.battle.net/login/en/… –  Saran Nov 8 '10 at 11:18

Btw, I'm the author from the mentioned blog above ;) I try to answer your question here.

I've looked at your certificate outputs from firefox and openssl and found something interesting.

Look the root ca certificate (index 1) at your openssl output. The issuer name is: Thawte Premium Server CA The subject name is: thawte Primary Root CA The subject and issuer names are different. Therefore, this certificate is not considered as the Root CA, because it was issued by another instance. Therefore, the bouncycastle provider is considering this certificate as the Root CA but it complains because issues and subject are different.

I have no idea how you obtained the "wrong" Root CA certificate. When I look at the Root CA certificate in firefox, the subject and issuer are the same, as it should be.

Try to get the right Root CA and try again.

Hope this helps. Greetings and good luck ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Tried. No success :( Thanks anyways :) –  Saran Nov 19 '10 at 17:11

I have finally solved my same "IssuerName does not match SubjectName" exception. I've followed the same blog by Antoine and what's described here numerous times, and here's how to make it finally work:

1) Our website uses two certificates from GeoTrust: the intermediate CA is issued to us by GeoTrust SSL CA, and the root CA is issued to GeoTrust SSL CA by GeoTrust Global CA;

2) If only the root CA or both the root and the intermediate CAs in 1) are used, I get the mismatch exception, because Android only supports a limited number of trusted root CA, and GeoTrust Global CA is not in the list;

3) In the support page of www.geotrust.com, there's a page called GeoTrust Cross Root CA, simply download it, save it to a name like crossroot.pem, and use this command to generate the keystore:

C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_24\bin>keytool -importcert -v -trustcacerts -file c:\ssl\crossroot.pem -alias newroot -keystore c:\ssl\crossroot.bks -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -providerpath "c:\downloads\bcprov-jdk16-145.jar" -storetype BKS -storepass mysecret

Step 2 of the blog by Antonie has a link to download the BouncyCastleProvider;

4) Add the keystore file to the Android project, and it works - this makes sense because now Android finds a trusted root Equifax Secure Certificate Authority (see the list above 1) whose SubjectName GeoTrust Global CA matches our site's root IssuerName.

5) The code in the step 3 of blog works fine, and just to make it more complete, I copied my test code below:

    HttpResponse response = client.execute(get);
    HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();

    BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(entity.getContent()));

    String line;
    while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) 
    System.out.println(line);
    in.close();

The tough part of this problem is if your root CA's issuer is not in the Android's trusted list, you'll have to get it from the company who issues you the certificates - ask them to provide you with a cross root CA that has the root issuer as one of the trusted root CAs of Android.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but if I import only the Cross Root CA, I get "Signature was not verified" exception. By following your lead, I found out that I already had the CrossRootCA -- it was the thawtePrimaryRootCA.crt file in my original attach/link -- when I compared it to Cross Root CA from Thawte's site link. Thanks nevertheless. –  Saran Apr 30 '11 at 10:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.