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I made a basic vehicles year/make/model/submodel database diagram here. I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around how I need to further set up my database so products know vehicles they belong to.

I'm thinking that I need to make another table that serves as a many to many relationship between Products and VehicleYears.

Essentially I want to be able to choose a vehicle on the front end and only show products that fit the currently selected vehicle.

This then brings up another possible issue. If vehicle years has a many relationship to products, would I still be able to filter out categories and/or sub categories based on the currently selected vehicle? (products belong to sub categories which then belong to categories)

I'm sure there is a way to write a query to handle categories and sub categories, but is there a better way to construct the database so that performance isn't an issue? My categories/item diagram is here.

  • After getting feedback here is my revised design here
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, theoretically you need an intermediate table from VehicleYears to Products.

But I don't understand your VehicleYears and VehicleYears_VehicleMakes tables. What does the VehicleYears_VehicleMakes relationship mean? That the vendor made any cars in that year? I think the relationship is rather a submodel-to-year one and if it is, you don't even need a table for your years, just put two columns into the submodel table.

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AndreKR, Every vehicle make is not available from ~1930-present. For instance Acura wasn't around in 1975. Otherwise I wouldn't make a separate year table. It seems that if I need to first filter by year, but the year is connected with sub models then I will be querying year 2010 sub models across all makes instead of choosing year/make/model/sub model which seems like it would be unnecessary work for the DB. –  The Muffin Man Nov 7 '10 at 0:21
    
In the first place that is the way to go. Get your data model right. After that, you can always introduce caches to get better performance, e.g. introduce a table that maps years to makes. Design such cache tables in a way that they can always be emptied and regenerated without affecting you data consistency. –  AndreKR Nov 7 '10 at 0:38
    
+1 Great minds think alike :) –  Chris Driver Nov 7 '10 at 0:45
    
I edited my original question to show a link of my new tables. –  The Muffin Man Nov 7 '10 at 21:10

Nick, the first thing that hits me is that you need to forget about modelling year as a separate table. So remove VehicleYears and VehicleYears_VehicleMakes. You just need add a year field to your VehicleSubModels table. I think year is better tied to the submodel of vehicle rather than a make of vehicle.

I think the link you are struggling to find between vehicles and products is a many:many between VehiclSubmodels and Items. Your new table VehicleProducts would have two fields ( a compound primary key) comprising of VehicleSubModelId and ItemId.

Modelling it this way you have a very granular way to relate products with vehicles. And you could easily achieve your goal of choosing a vehicle and getting all the relevant items listed.

Your design for categories and sub categories is fine but I wonder if you'll ever get to a point where you need a third level of categorisation - a SubSubCategory :) if so it may be wise to bite the bullet now and get that in your design.

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Chris I believe there is no other way to do it because makes need to belongs to years so that if you choose the year 1975 Acura won't be in the list of available makes. If you can't choose a make then you can't choose a model & sub model. As far as sub categories go I want to keep the hierarchy as small as possible so that customers get to products as quickly as possible and can then make the decision to filter the results via controls on the page. –  The Muffin Man Nov 7 '10 at 0:14
    
+1 Yes, there is another way, just the way we described. Just as you want, Acura won't show up when you select a year because when you join over the relations SubModel -> Model -> Make and you restrict the year to 1975 it won't be found as there is no SubModel (that leads to a Model) that leads to Acura. –  AndreKR Nov 7 '10 at 0:26
    
I understand now, if I keep it the way I was thinking then if Acura was available from 1980-present that would mean that every model would be available through those years which is not correct. –  The Muffin Man Nov 7 '10 at 0:38
    
Yes, you got it. –  AndreKR Nov 7 '10 at 0:43

I've done something like this for publisher trying to attach repair procedures to a product. The product is identified by a four-part primary key: Year, Make, Model, Engine, or YMME, and the vehicles table looked like this (simplified):

VEHICLES
year  integer
make   varchar
model  varchar
engine varchar

The PARTS table has to be linked to an entity in the VEHICLES table. A part might work with a specific year and make and model, but not when a specific engine was installed.

In your case, you have to decide what constellation of attributes uniquely identifies a bicycle. If you're tracking bikes from multiple makers, you need MAKE. If things change from year to year, you need YEAR. If there is a difference from model to model, you need MODEL. If, say, a part will work if the frame is aluminum but not if the frame is steel, you'd need FRAME_MATERIAL or FRAME_GAUGE as well, in place of ENGINE, or you'd need a separate model one for aluminum, the other for steel.

VEHICLES
year  
make 
model 
frame

Then you could simply have an intermediary table:

VEHICLE_PARTS
partid  integer foreign key references PARTS
year
make
model
frame
...

or

VEHICLE_PARTS
partid  integer foreign key references PARTS
year
make
model   (frame material is handled by a separate model)

Your structure has to answer the question: Will this part work with that bike? The mere presence of the partid in the VEHICLE_PARTS table should imply, Yes it does. You really want to avoid having an Exceptions field in the VEHICLE_PARTS table where there is some human-readable notation that says the part is incompatible with the bike in question when rams-horn handlebars are used. You should really create a separate model to handle things like that.

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