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In the code snippet below when I originally designed it, the "next number" needed to send the next incremented value throughout the execution of the application. So I made the class a singleton. However, with some recent change in requirements I needed to do a reset on the "next number". I just added a reset method to do that. However, it definitely violates the Singleton pattern and also I know it is not a good idea to initialize a static member this way.

What do you think I should do instead?

public final class GetNextNumber {
    private static GetNextNumber instance; 
    private static Integer nextNumber=1;
    private GetNextNumber() {
    }
    public static synchronized GetNextNumber getInstance() {
        if(instance==null){
            instance = new GetNextNumber();
        }
        return instance;
    } 
    protected Integer getNextNumber(){
        return nextNumber++;
    }
    protected synchronized void reset(){
        nextNumber=1;
    }
    public Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        throw new CloneNotSupportedException();
    }
}
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1  
You don't need that clone() method. All it does is reproduce the default behaviour. As your class is final and doesn't implement Cloneable there is no way for it to have any other behaviour anyway. It also makes clone() public rather than protected, which in this case is futile. –  EJP Nov 7 '10 at 0:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

why aren't the fields just instance variables? theres no need for static here.

reset doesn't need to be synchronized either, unless getNextNumber is as well.

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Looks OK to me - except for two things:

  • getNextNumber is not synchronized.
  • since getNextNumber and reset are not static, nextNumber doesn't need to be static, either.

You could use an AtomicInteger to avoid having to make your getNextNumber and reset methods synchronized:

public final class GetNextNumber {

    private static GetNextNumber instance;

    private AtomicInteger nextNumber = new AtomicInteger(1);

    private GetNextNumber() {
    }

    public static synchronized GetNextNumber getInstance() {
        if(instance==null){
            instance = new GetNextNumber();
        }
        return instance;
    } 

    protected Integer getNextNumber(){
        return nextNumber.getAndIncrement();
    }

    protected void reset(){
        nextNumber.set(1);
    }
}

For futher discussion on this, see for example The Atomic classes in Java 5: AtomicInteger and AtomicLong:

Before Java 5, we had to write classes with access to the counter variable in synchronized blocks or methods, or else use a volatile variable which is a lighter form of synchronization but with the risk that some updates could be missed if they happen concurrently. An AtomicInteger can be used as a drop-in replacement that provides the best of both worlds...

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