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I have a StreamReader object that I initialized with a stream, now I want to save this stream to disk (the stream may be a .gif or .jpg or .pdf).

Existing Code:

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(myOtherObject.InputStream);
  1. I need to save this to disk (I have the filename).
  2. In the future I may want to store this to SQL Server.

I have the encoding type also, which I will need if I store it to SQL Server, correct?

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9 Answers 9

As highlighted by Tilendor in Jon Skeet's answer, streams have a CopyTo method since .NET 4.

var fileStream = File.Create("C:\\Path\\To\\File");
myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
myOtherObject.InputStream.CopyTo(fileStream);
fileStream.Close();

Or with the using syntax:

using (var fileStream = File.Create("C:\\Path\\To\\File"))
{
    myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    myOtherObject.InputStream.CopyTo(fileStream);
}
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35  
Note that you have to call myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin) if you're not already at the beginning or you won't copy the entire stream. –  Steve Rukuts Mar 22 '12 at 12:00
3  
Now you have 100 upvotes and the Great Answer badge... :) –  Leniel Macaferi Aug 9 '12 at 20:27
    
@LenielMacaferi Thx :) –  Antoine Leclair Aug 10 '12 at 13:51
1  
If this input stream is got from http connection then will it buffer and download and then write all the bytes from the source????? –  dbw Jan 4 '14 at 14:16
1  
I have created PDF viewer where I am using stream, once I bind the stream and when I save the pdf file using the same stream then without using "Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin)" I wont be able to save correct document. so +1 for mentioning this "Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin)" –  user2463514 Mar 6 '14 at 12:28

You must not use StreamReader for binary files (like gifs or jpgs). StreamReader is for text data. You will almost certainly lose data if you use it for arbitrary binary data. (If you use Encoding.GetEncoding(28591) you will probably be okay, but what's the point?)

Why do you need to use a StreamReader at all? Why not just keep the binary data as binary data and write it back to disk (or SQL) as binary data?

EDIT: As this seems to be something people want to see... if you do just want to copy one stream to another (e.g. to a file) use something like this:

/// <summary>
/// Copies the contents of input to output. Doesn't close either stream.
/// </summary>
public static void CopyStream(Stream input, Stream output)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8 * 1024];
    int len;
    while ( (len = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        output.Write(buffer, 0, len);
    }    
}

To use it to dump a stream to a file, for example:

using (Stream file = File.Create(filename))
{
    CopyStream(input, file);
}
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1  
John, the API I am using returns a Stream object of an attachment (pop3 component) so I want to have the option of saving to file or sqlserver. So if I call myAPI.SomeStream how would I store that do disk?? (thanks) –  Loadman Jan 4 '09 at 21:54
5  
This seems like such a common case I'm surprised its not in .NET. I see people creating byte arrays the size of the entire file, which can cause problems for big files. –  Tilendor Dec 7 '10 at 17:00
62  
@Tilendor: It's present as an extension method in .NET 4. (CopyTo) –  Jon Skeet Dec 7 '10 at 17:17
25  
I don't think it is an extension method, but it's new in Stream class. –  Kugel Jan 24 '11 at 21:43
6  
@Kugel: You're right, sorry. I had it as an extension method in a utility library, but now that it's in Stream itself, my extension method doesn't get called. –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 22:02
public void CopyStream(Stream stream, string destPath)
{
  using (var fileStream = new FileStream(destPath, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write))
  {
    stream.CopyTo(fileStream);
  }
}
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2  
Can you expand on how this solution works? –  Denomales Aug 1 '13 at 20:45
10  
You probably shouldn't put the stream object in the using(){} bracket. Your method didn't create the stream, so it shouldn't dispose of it. –  LarsTech Aug 1 '13 at 21:16
1  
Instead you need to put FileStream instead to using, otherwise it will be kept open until it is garbage collected. –  Pavel Chikulaev Jan 16 '14 at 23:55
//If you don't have .Net 4.0  :)

public void SaveStreamToFile(Stream stream, string filename)
{  
   using(Stream destination = File.Create(filename))
      Write(stream, destination);
}

//Typically I implement this Write method as a Stream extension method. 
//The framework handles buffering.

public void Write(Stream from, Stream to)
{
   for(int a = from.ReadByte(); a != -1; a = from.ReadByte())
      to.WriteByte( (byte) a );
}

/*
Note, StreamReader is an IEnumerable<Char> while Stream is an IEnumbable<byte>.
The distinction is significant such as in multiple byte character encodings 
like Unicode used in .Net where Char is one or more bytes (byte[n]). Also, the
resulting translation from IEnumerable<byte> to IEnumerable<Char> can loose bytes
or insert them (for example, "\n" vs. "\r\n") depending on the StreamReader instance
CurrentEncoding.
*/
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13  
Copying a stream byte-by-byte (using ReadByte/WriteByte) will be much slower than copying buffer-by-buffer (using Read(byte[], int, int)/Write(byte[], int,int)). –  Kevin Aug 10 '11 at 3:10

Why not use a FileStream object?

public void SaveStreamToFile(string fileFullPath, Stream stream)
{
    if (stream.Length == 0) return;

    // Create a FileStream object to write a stream to a file
    using (FileStream fileStream = System.IO.File.Create(fileFullPath, (int)stream.Length))
    {
        // Fill the bytes[] array with the stream data
        byte[] bytesInStream = new byte[stream.Length];
        stream.Read(bytesInStream, 0, (int)bytesInStream.Length);

        // Use FileStream object to write to the specified file
        fileStream.Write(bytesInStream, 0, bytesInStream.Length);
     }
}
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33  
what if the input stream is 1GB long - this code would try to allocate 1GB buffer :) –  Buthrakaur Jun 30 '11 at 7:56
2  
Buthrakaur is right -- this answer should be deleted. –  Frank Hileman May 23 '13 at 21:08
    
This is not working with ResponseStream, because it is of uknown length. –  qub1n Oct 18 '13 at 10:31
public void testdownload(stream input)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[16345];
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(this.FullLocalFilePath,
                        FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None))
    {
        int read;
        while ((read = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
        {
             fs.Write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
    }
}
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Another option is to get the stream to a byte[] and use File.WriteAllBytes. This should do:

using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    input.CopyTo(stream);
    File.WriteAllBytes(file, stream.ToArray());
}

Wrapping it in an extension method gives it better naming:

public void WriteTo(this Stream input, string file)
{
    //your fav write method:

    using (var stream = File.Create(file))
    {
        input.CopyTo(stream);
    }

    //or

    using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        input.CopyTo(stream);
        File.WriteAllBytes(file, stream.ToArray());
    }

    //whatever that fits.
}
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private void SaveFileStream(String path, Stream stream)
{
    var fileStream = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
    stream.CopyTo(fileStream);
    fileStream.Dispose();
}
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Already answered. –  nawfal Feb 13 '14 at 10:59
2  
And also, use using (it is much cleaner). –  Styxxy Jun 18 '14 at 9:59
    
Using is not just cleaner, it is more reliable. –  LastTribunal Jan 12 at 5:12

Converting an FTP memorystream into a filestream

foreach (var file in DirectoryList)
         {
               using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
               {
                   client.DownloadFile(file.Name, memoryStream);
                   using (var fileStream = File.Create(@"C:\temp\" + file.Name))
                   {
                       memoryStream.WriteTo(fileStream);
                   }
               }
          }
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