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I wonder why putting a comma at the end of a single element is legal in an array:

var array = [
    'foo', // no error in IDE
]

while putting it at the end of a single element in an object is illegal (at least my IDE - Webstorm - is flagging about an error):

var object = {
    'foo': 'bar', // error in IDE
}

Is this really illegal in javascript?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

In the ECMAScript 5 specification it is legal:

ObjectLiteral : 
    { } 
    { PropertyNameAndValueList } 
    { PropertyNameAndValueList , } 

It was illegal in ECMAScript 3.

ObjectLiteral : 
    { } 
    { PropertyNameAndValueList } 

I believe it was made legal to make things like this doable.

function getItems() {
    return {
        one : 1,
        two : 2,
        three : 3,
        //four : 4,
    };
}

Instead of this:

function getItems() {
    return {
        one : 1,
        two : 2,
        three : 3//,
        //four : 4,
    };
}

Saving some of the programmers time.

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+1 for going to the spec. Now, why they would add that second line to make this construction legal confounds me. –  mkoistinen Nov 7 '10 at 2:44
    
@mkoistinen - See update. –  ChaosPandion Nov 7 '10 at 2:49
    
What about ECMAScript 4? –  Eric Nov 7 '10 at 3:08
1  
you wouldn't happen to have a link to where it says that in the spec would you? –  zzzzBov Nov 7 '10 at 3:29
1  
@zzzzBov - See section 11.1.5 Object Initialiser: ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/ECMA-262.pdf –  ChaosPandion Nov 7 '10 at 3:32

In addition to what ChaosPandion mentioned, there's an important difference between a , at the end of an object and an array. Empty commas in an array (technically called elisions) insert undefined elements at the corresponding position; this increases the length of the array but the values are undefined.

Edit: Thanks to ChaosPandion and CMS for pointing out the error. I just reread the specs and indeed a single trailing comma does not increase the length, however any additional trailing commas or any commas in the middle of an array will increase the length.

For example, [ 1,2,, ] is an array of length 3 and the same as [ 1, 2, undefined ]. Similarly, [ 1,,,2 ] is an array of length 4 and the same as [ 1, undefined, undefined, 2 ].

Strangely enough, when it comes to this "feature" of JavaScript, IE behaves correctly with a trailing comma in an array (it counts the extra element) while Firefox ignores the last undefined element.

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1  
A small mistake, the syntax allows one trailing comma so to make an array of length three you would have to write this: [ 1,2,, ] –  ChaosPandion Nov 7 '10 at 2:58
    
See previous comment. But +1 for talking about arrays and trailing commas. –  user166390 Nov 7 '10 at 3:27
    
excellent answer –  ScottSEA Nov 7 '10 at 3:28
    
@casablanca, a trailing comma in ArrayInitializer shouldn't insert undefined element, this was misunderstood by some implementers of ES3, now in ES5 this was clarified: From ES5 Annex D "Edition 5 clarifies the fact that a trailing comma at the end of an ArrayInitializer does not add to the length of the array. This is not a semantic change from Edition 3 but some implementations may have previously misinterpreted this." –  CMS Nov 7 '10 at 4:42
    
... so, IE <=8 (JScript <= 5.8 more precisely) misbehaves with trailing commas on ArrayInitializer -they should be ignored-, but it has the right ES3 behavior for ObjectLiterals as @ChaosPandion mentions on his answer, a trailing comma isn't valid for a ES3 implementation (IE correctly throws SyntaxError e.g. ({a:0,})), thing that other ES3 implementations tolerate (obviously as a non-standard ES3 syntax extension). –  CMS Nov 7 '10 at 5:12

Firefox tolerates it, most other sane browsers do so to. Do I still need to mention IE chokes on it?

Anyway, simply ensure there are no commas at the end of arrays/objects. While languages like PHP and - depending on the implementation - JavaScript are fine with it, it is extremely ugly - you also wouldn't leave a string at the end of a file unclosed just because the parser could consider EOF as a valid string end.

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IE8 hates it -- still. –  user166390 Nov 7 '10 at 3:25
    
Do you think it's a mistake that C enforces a semi-colon on the final line of a file? :-) –  james.haggerty Oct 31 '12 at 7:31

Yes, if you are using IE.

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1  
Using IE (at least IE<9) at all should be made illegal, too. :> –  ThiefMaster Nov 7 '10 at 2:43

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