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Just like editing C source file, I can press % to get the closing } for the current cursor's {. How can I do this when editing html files? Is there any shortcuts? To be clear, I want:

<html>
</html>

When the curosr moves to <html> , I want to press a key, so that the cursor will jump to </html>.

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possible duplicate of Jump to matching XML tags in Vim – kenorb Feb 14 '15 at 0:24
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You should be able to do this with the matchit plugin by typing % when your mouse is on the opening tag.

http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=39

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3  
If I am not mistaken, matchit plugin is included into vim distro, so this link is irrelevant. To install it, see :h matchit-install (but I suggest you to replace all cp commands with ln -s, in order not to recopy matchit every time it is updated). – ZyX Nov 7 '10 at 11:14
1  
Depends on your distro. It seems gvimportable from portableapps.com does not include it. I might be mistaken and I hope so. – Benoit Nov 9 '10 at 19:04

You can jump between tags using visual operators, in example:

  1. Place the cursor on the tag.
  2. Enter visual mode by pressing v.
  3. Select the outer tag block by pressing a+t or i+t for inner tag block.

Your cursor should jump forward to the matching closing html/xml tag. To jump backwards from closing tag, press o or O to jump to opposite tag.

Now you can either exit visual by pressing Esc, change it by c or copy by y.


To record that action into register, press qq to start recording, perform tag jump as above (including Esc), press q to finish. Then to invoke jump, press @q.


See more help at :help visual-operators or :help v_it:

at a <tag> </tag> block (with tags)

it inner <tag> </tag> block


Alternatively use plugin such as matchit.vim (See: Using % in languages without curly braces).


See also:

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1  
Outstanding. I had been looking for something to parse HTML and find beginning and end tags, but could find nothing useful. HTML is a jumbled mess at the best of times. The worst of all markups, and no markup is good. This worked well, thanks. – MagicLAMP Feb 25 '15 at 8:50

I have had problems with this is the past, even with the matchit plugin. The way I solved it was to modify b:match_words on xml-type files. Here is the relevant section from my .vimrc:

  autocmd FileType html let b:match_words = '<\(\w\w*\):</\1,{:}'
  autocmd FileType xhtml let b:match_words = '<\(\w\w*\):</\1,{:}'
  autocmd FileType xml let b:match_words = '<\(\w\w*\):</\1,{:}'

Try it out, see if it helps any.

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You may have a line in your .vimrc : :let loaded_matchit = 1. I added it at beginning without read the doc carefully. So it make me spends a lot of time debugging this error. – Frank Cheng Dec 28 '11 at 7:37
    
In my case I don't have this line, but thank you for the tip. – Nick Knowlson Jan 6 '12 at 23:40

MatchTagAlways is a plugin that always highlights the XML/HTML tags that enclose your cursor location.

https://github.com/Valloric/MatchTagAlways

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