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I need some operations that are to be performed on large long[]s to be very fast. The only option I can see is to use the Android NDK. Can anyone give a summary on what using the NDK does to my app in terms of which devices can use the app and what the implications are to maintaining my app?

I saw that you need to specify which architecture you want to compile your C code for, like ARM and Intel. What happens when new architectures for Android appear? Will I have to update my app every time a new architecture appears?

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Yes you'll need an executable for each architectures. You can probably just include them all and load the ones you need, but I've never used the NDK. What exactly are you doin on the longs? Are you SURE that's a bottleneck in your code? Have you implemented it and profiled it? –  Falmarri Nov 7 '10 at 6:34
    
The long operation involves masking the first 8 bits, performing a few additions and multiplications, putting the bits back and then doing this for the remaining bits. It's painfully slow in Java (e..g 1s to execute when I want about 0.1s) and seems the ideal candidate for NDK. The code is simple though and will work on all archs. –  RichardNewton Nov 7 '10 at 6:42
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Can anyone give a summary on what using the NDK does to my app in terms of which devices can use the app

Only devices running on a CPU for which you have an NDK .so will be able to run your app.

and what the implications are to maintaining my app?

Testing on multiple CPU architectures may require hardware for each architecture. I say "may" because...

What happens when new architectures for Android appear?

...we really have no idea. Other than adding ARM7 support, the NDK has not changed its targets.

Right now, there are two major non-ARM platforms for Android that I can think of:

  • Intel Atom, being used by Google TV devices. At the time of this writing, the NDK does not support this. However, you can't ship apps for Google TV yet, either. So, it may be that the NDK will be updated by the time we get to write Google TV apps.
  • MIPS. At the time of this writing, the NDK does not support this. I have no idea what the plans might be in this area.

It is conceivable that emulators will appear to emulate those CPUs. After all, the existing Android emulator emulates ARM5. However, unless and until this happens, you will need test hardware for every architecture you intend to support.

Will I have to update my app every time a new architecture appears?

Only if you want to support the new architecture. Until there is a critical mass of devices for it that can access your app, any new architecture is not going to be terribly important. "Critical mass" could be from general device sales, or it could be because you strike an OEM deal to have your app bundled on somebody's device.

The code is simple though and will work on all archs.

Watch your endian-ness.

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Awesome, thanks for your post. Last thing, if someone say, has a new Intel Atom based phone and my app doesn't have a .so for that CPU, will my app be hidden from them in the market? –  RichardNewton Nov 7 '10 at 12:38
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@RichardNewton: I hope so. I suppose you could create an ARM7-only app and see if ARM5 devices see it on the Market, to test the theory before Atom-based Market-compatible devices show up. However, since there are so few architectures supported today, it's all a bit nebulous at the moment. –  CommonsWare Nov 7 '10 at 13:00
    
I take it Google will have some strategy for handling all this though. I couldn't find any stats, but the NDK is being used by developers and Google encourage its use so it doesn't seem a risk to make an app that uses the NDK as far as I can see. –  RichardNewton Nov 7 '10 at 14:11
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@RichardNewton: The only risk is that there may be a time window between when an architecture is released and when you can get an NDK-empowered app working on it. With luck, these windows will be small to non-existent. But, we'll only know when it happens. –  CommonsWare Nov 7 '10 at 14:12
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