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So I've been doing some JavaScript class-like stuff such as

MyClass = function()
{
   var x;

   this.sayX = function()
   {
      alert(x);
   }
}

but I've also seen

MyClass = function()
{
   this.x = 0;
}

MyClass.prototype.sayX = function()
{
   alert(this.x);
}

The big question is, am I still wasting memory space in today's JavaScript engines, or are they capable of seeing the duplication in my method and optimizing them out? The reason I ask is because I'd rather do proper data hiding and not have to prefix absolutely everything with 'this'.

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As a note, you can use with(this) { } if it helps you out. –  Conspicuous Compiler Nov 7 '10 at 7:02
4  
DO NOT use "with". It's dangerous to use and will be removed from future implementations of ECAMScript. Cannot stress this enough - it is much better to pretend that "with" does not exist in JavaScript. –  Hamish Nov 7 '10 at 7:14
    
If you do it the first way, if you do any inheritance you'll need to be a lot more careful about what you do, how you mix the two techniques, when you call the super constructor, etc. –  Chris Morgan Nov 20 '10 at 2:01

2 Answers 2

The memory footprint of the first one will always be larger. Consider prototype as a shared package of methods that all instances can use. It is effective because you don't create a new function for every instance, but you're reusing the existing method already in memory.

The good news is that the two ways you showed can be combined.

MyClass = function () {
   var x;
   // public method with access 
   // to private variables
   this.sayX = function () {
      alert(x);
   };
}
// method that doesn't need access to private variables
MyClass.prototype.sharedMethod = function () {
   // ...
}

But as far as you're dealing with small codebase, you shouldn't worry about memory usage. You can even use patterns like

// everything will be created for every
// instance, but the whole thing is nicely
// wrapped into one 'factory' function
myClass = function () {
   // private variables
   var x;

   // private methods
   function doSomethingWithX() {}

   // public interface
   return {
     sayX: function () {
       alert(x);
     },
     publicMethod: function () { .. },
     // ...
   };
};

Note, I intentionally changed myClass to lowercase, because it's no longer a constructor function and there's no need to use new when invoking!


UPDATE - there's a third pattern which well suits your needs:

MyClass = function (x, y, whatever) {
   this._init.apply(this, arguments);
}

// The prototype creates a scope for data hiding.
// It also includes a constructor function.
MyClass.prototype = (function () {
   var x; // private
   return {
     _init: function (x_in) {
       x = x_in;
     },
     sayX: function () {
       alert(x);
     },
     // ...
   };
})();
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This is not strictly true ("The memory footprint of the first one will always be larger"). Imagine that there is only one object of said type in existence at a time. Although then you could perhaps argue the first case has another execution context bound... but that's even finer hairs :-) –  user166390 Nov 7 '10 at 9:25
    
Your comment is hardly constructive. If he needs only one instance of an object he creates a singleton and doesn't worry about memory footprint. –  galambalazs Nov 7 '10 at 9:30
    
That's very informative, but it doesn't actually answer my question at all. Can modern JavaScript engines optimize out that overhead? I may just build some tests to find out. –  RandomInsano Nov 19 '10 at 23:46
1  
The first sentence answers your question. The two code you showed are not identical because they have different scope chains, so it can't be optimized. I've updated the answer with a third pattern, which let's you use data hiding, uses shared function (small memory footprint), and has a constructor. Demo: jsbin.com/osixa4 –  galambalazs Nov 20 '10 at 1:35
1  
It should be noted that the third pattern is arguably non-idiomatic as it requires the use of the new keyword and each instance is unique, however all instances share the same state. In some ways they're like instances, in others like singletons. Executing five = new MyClass(5); seven = new MyClass(7); five.sayX(); yields "7". –  G-Wiz Mar 29 '12 at 16:59

Revisiting this a huge amount later, but it turns out V8 is smart enough that it doesn't create multiple instanced of that function in the first method. Go hidden classes :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWhMKalEicY

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