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I'm looking to create an associative array in JS, but use constants defined as part of the class as indices.

The reason I want this is so that users of the class can use the constants (which define events) to trigger actions.

Some code to illustrate:

STATE_NORMAL = 0;
STATE_NEW_TASK_ADDED = 0;
this.curr_state = STATE_NEW_TASK_ADDED;

this.state_machine = {
    /* Prototype:
    STATE_NAME: {
        EVENT_NAME: {
            "next_state": new_state_name,
            "action": func
        }
    }
    */

    STATE_NEW_TASK_ADDED : { // I'd like this to be a constant
        this.EVENT_NEW_TASK_ADDED_AJAX : {
            "next_state": STATE_NEW_TASK_ADDED,
            "action" : function() {console.log("new task added");},
        }
    }
}

// Public data members.
// These define the various events that can happen.
this.EVENT_NEW_TASK_ADDED_AJAX = 0;
this.EVENT_NEW_TASK_ADDED_AJAX = 1;

I'm having trouble getting this to work. I'm not too great with JS, but it looks like no matter what I do, the array gets defined with strings and not constants. Is there any way to force the array to use the constants?

Thanks!

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up vote 20 down vote accepted

The problem here, actually, is that you can't use a value for the key part when you're defining an object literally.

That is to say, you CAN say this:

var CONSTANT_A = 0, CONSTANT_B = 1, CONSTANT_C = 2;
var state_machine = {};
state_machine[CONSTANT_A] = { ... };
state_machine[CONSTANT_B] = { ... };

But you can't say this:

var CONSTANT_A = 0, CONSTANT_B = 1, CONSTANT_C = 2;
var state_machine = { CONSTANT_A: ..., CONSTANT_B: ... };

JavaScript lets you use a "shorthand" to define object literals where you can omit the double-quotes around keys. As such, you can't use an expression there.

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In ES6 you can use computed values for object keys.

var CONSTANT_A = 0, CONSTANT_B = 1
var state_machine = {
    [CONSTANT_A]: function () {
        return 'a'
    },
    [CONSTANT_B]: function () {
        return 'b'
    }
};

console.log(state_machine)

This does not work in IE 11 nor in safari browsers: https://kangax.github.io/compat-table/es6/#test-object_literal_extensions_computed_properties

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