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Edit: I initially accepted thejh's answer, but I wasn't really satisfied with it since I wanted to make proper use of generics. So, I kept doing research and found a solution. Read about it in my answer below.


Here's a little self-contained piece of Java code which shows what I'm trying to do. It compiles, runs, and behaves correctly.

 1 import java.lang.reflect.Method;
 2 import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
 3 
 4 public class Example
 5 {
 6    public static <T> void foo(Method method, String target, Object argument, T expectedReturn) throws NoSuchMethodException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException
 7    {
 8       T actualReturn = (T) method.invoke(target, argument);
 9       System.out.print(actualReturn.equals(expectedReturn));
10    }
11    
12    public static void main(String[ ] args) throws NoSuchMethodException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException
13    {
14       foo(String.class.getMethod("charAt", int.class), "test", 1, 'e');
15    }
16 }

Running this prints true to the console, which is what I expected. What's bothering me is that, due to the cast on line 8, I'm getting a warning when I compile it, as follows (jGRASP is my IDE, by the way).

----jGRASP exec: javac -g -Xlint:unchecked Sandbox.java
Sandbox.java:8: warning: [unchecked] unchecked cast
found : java.lang.Object
required: T
1 warning

----jGRASP: operation complete.

Originally, I tried line 8 without the cast, but that failed to compile with an error complaining about finding an Object when it required T (invoke returns an Object). Later on, I rewrote it like this, blindly hoping to get rid of the warning.

T actualReturn = method.getReturnType( ).cast(method.invoke(target, argument));

But that gives a compile error that I can't make head nor tail of.

----jGRASP exec: javac -g -Xlint:unchecked Sandbox.java
Sandbox.java:8: incompatible types
found : capture#898 of ?
required: T
1 error

----jGRASP wedge: exit code for process is 1.
----jGRASP: operation complete.

And that number next to capture# is different each time I try to compile with that same line of code.

So, what exactly is the problem? Why am I getting the warning when I cast the object returned by invoke to the type variable? Does that indicate that I'm doing something wrong? How can I write this so that the warning goes away? And I'd prefer not to suppress it with an annotation, as that doesn't seem like much of a solution to me.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I looked into this some more and found that I could solve the problem by using class literals as runtime type tokens, as discussed in the Java Tutorials.

I had the right idea with method.getReturnType( ).cast(...), but it didn't work because the return type of getReturnType( ) is Class<?>, and I needed Class<T>.

So, here's what the method looks like now.

public static <T> void foo(Class<T> returnType, Method method, String target, Object argument, T expectedReturn) throws NoSuchMethodException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException
{
    T actualReturn = returnType.cast(method.invoke(target, argument));
    System.out.print(actualReturn.equals(expectedReturn));
}

And here's a sample call.

foo(Character.class, String.class.getMethod("charAt", int.class), "test", 1, 'e');

That compiles without warnings and prints true to the console. Note that if you're expecting the underlying method to return a primitive, the returnType parameter needs to be its respective wrapper class.

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Why do you cast it to T? Why don't you do it this way?

Object actualReturn = method.invoke(target, argument);
System.out.print(actualReturn.equals(expectedReturn));

Oh, and in case the method could return null and expectedReturn isn't, this is better:

Object actualReturn = method.invoke(target, argument);
System.out.print(expectedReturn.equals(actualReturn));
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That's actually how I did it originally, but it seemed weird to me just using the Object class like that. I was worried that it wouldn't always work, because I wasn't totally sure how it worked. –  gdejohn Nov 7 '10 at 12:06
1  
Well, it works. –  thejh Nov 7 '10 at 12:14
    
Okay, I'm back to using a plain Object. It does seem to work just fine, and there aren't any compiler warnings. So, thanks. I used expectedReturn == null ? actualReturn == null : expectedReturn.equals(actualReturn), by the way. –  gdejohn Nov 7 '10 at 22:53
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So, what exactly is the problem? Why am I getting the warning when I cast the object returned by invoke to the type variable?

Method can return any Object. And it can't be cast to T in all cases.

Does that indicate that I'm doing something wrong?

it's bad practice to mix reflection and generics, imho.

How can I write this so that the warning goes away?

Personally, I think you can't avoid this warning without refactoring.

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Well, I'm a student, and this is for a class I wrote to automatically test my assignments. So, if I'm going to be able to reuse it without majorly rewriting it every single time, it kinda needs to use reflection and generics. At least, that's my understanding. Is there another way to go about it? –  gdejohn Nov 7 '10 at 11:49
    
@Charlatan: Normally, you would use JUnit tests for such stuff, but also there, you have to write a test class and test methods for each thing you want to test. –  thejh Nov 7 '10 at 11:52
    
@Charlatan : Did you try JUnit for your task? –  Stas Kurilin Nov 7 '10 at 11:53
    
No, I have not used JUnit. Writing an automated testing class was extra credit for one of my assignments, and I just enjoy learning about this stuff, so I've been working on making it more general for reuse later on. It's not so much an issue for me of whether JUnit is the more practical thing for automated testing, but rather that I want to do it myself. –  gdejohn Nov 7 '10 at 12:03
    
@Charlatan : In this case you can easily use @thejh 's solution, can't you? –  Stas Kurilin Nov 7 '10 at 12:07
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