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What it's the best way to generate a string of \t's in C#

I am learning C# and experimenting with different ways of saying the same thing.

Tabs(uint t) is a function that returns a string with t amount of \t's

For example Tabs(3) returns "\t\t\t"

Which of these three ways of implementing Tabs(uint numTabs) is best?

Of course that depends on what "best" means.

  1. The LINQ version is only two lines, which is nice. But are the calls to Repeat and Aggregate unnecessarily time/resource consuming?

  2. The StringBuilder version is very clear but is the StringBuilder class somehow slower?

  3. The string version is basic, which means it is easy to understand.

  4. Does it not matter at all? Are they all equal?

These are all questions to help me get a better feel for C#.

private string Tabs(uint numTabs)
{
    IEnumerable<string> tabs = Enumerable.Repeat("\t", (int) numTabs);
    return (numTabs > 0) ? tabs.Aggregate((sum, next) => sum + next) : ""; 
}  

private string Tabs(uint numTabs)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (uint i = 0; i < numTabs; i++)
        sb.Append("\t");

    return sb.ToString();
}  

private string Tabs(uint numTabs)
{
    string output = "";
    for (uint i = 0; i < numTabs; i++)
    {
        output += '\t';
    }
    return output; 
}
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13 Answers 13

up vote 527 down vote accepted

What about this:

string tabs = new String('\t', n);

Or better:

static string Tabs(int n)
{
    return new String('\t', n);
}
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7  
funny. I missed that, hehe. :-) –  Alex Baranosky Jan 4 '09 at 22:07
68  
i learned something new today :) –  Usman Masood Jun 20 '11 at 22:25
    
is there any way to repeat this for a word? instead of using '\t' how to use "time" –  user1478137 Apr 3 '13 at 12:41
    
See further down: stackoverflow.com/a/3097925/281077 –  Paaland Apr 4 '13 at 8:18
    
@user1478137 Or, better (also further down): this –  Xynariz Apr 8 at 19:51

The best version is certainly to use the builtin way:

string Tabs(int len) { return new string('\t', len); }

Of the other solutions, prefer the easiest; only if this is proving too slow, strive for a more efficient solution.

If you use a StringBuilder and know its resulting length in advance, then also use an appropriate constructor, this is much more efficient because it means that only one time-consuming allocation takes place, and no unnecessary copying of data. Nonsense: of course the above code is more efficient.

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9  
sb.Append('\t', len); –  Dangph Jun 3 '10 at 2:27
1  
My benchmarks are showing new string('\t', len) to be between 2x and 7x faster than the StringBuilder approach. Why do you think StringBuilder is more efficient in this case? –  StriplingWarrior Aug 23 '11 at 16:32
2  
@StriplingWarrior Brain fart. Thanks for correcting this (after it has been standing here for two years, no less!). –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 23 '11 at 17:30

What about using extension method?


public static class StringExtensions
{
   public static string Repeat(this char chatToRepeat, int repeat) {

       return new string(chatToRepeat,repeat);
   }
   public  static string Repeat(this string stringToRepeat,int repeat)
   {
       var builder = new StringBuilder(repeat*stringToRepeat.Length);
       for (int i = 0; i < repeat; i++) {
           builder.Append(stringToRepeat);
       }
       return builder.ToString();
   }
}

You could then write :

Debug.WriteLine('-'.Repeat(100)); // For Chars  
Debug.WriteLine("Hello".Repeat(100)); // For Strings

Note that a performance test of using the stringbuilder version for simple characters instead of strings gives you a major preformance penality : on my computer the difference in mesured performance is 1:20 between: Debug.WriteLine('-'.Repeat(1000000)) //char version and
Debug.WriteLine("-".Repeat(1000000)) //string version

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Well in all version of .NET to repeat a string you could always do this

public static string Repeat(string value, int count)
{
  return new StringBuilder().Insert(0, value, count).ToString();
}

for chars @CMS new String('\t', n) is your best bet.

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Extension methods:

public static string Repeat(this string s, int n)
{
    return new String(Enumerable.Range(0, n).SelectMany(x => s).ToArray());
}

public static string Repeat(this char c, int n)
{
    return new String(c, n);
}
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4  
Once upon a time people used while loops –  prabhakaran Sep 26 '13 at 11:31
1  
nice answer, helped me more than new String('\t', 2)... –  Ace Mark Sep 27 '13 at 1:18
    
@prabhakaran I agree but the advantage of Linq is in communication; it's almost always trivial to reimplement a Linq expression using imperative constructs. –  Rodrick Chapman Oct 7 '13 at 4:14
string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat("ab", 2));

Returns

"abab"

And

string.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat("a", 2));

Returns

"aa"

from...

Is there a built-in function to repeat string or char in .net?

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Make it better by doing it without Linq and with StruingBuilder! –  Eve Apr 15 at 15:29

How about this:

//Repeats a character specified number of times
public static string Repeat(char character,int numberOfIterations)
{
    return "".PadLeft(numberOfIterations, character);
}

//Call the Repeat method
Console.WriteLine(Repeat('\t',40));
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1  
haha.. that's what I could think of when I fell into this situation once. But personally I found new string('\t', 10) to be the best solution –  shashwat Nov 18 '13 at 11:27

Your first example which uses Enumerable.Repeat:

private string Tabs(uint numTabs)
     {
         IEnumerable<string> tabs = Enumerable.Repeat(
                                      "\t", (int) numTabs);
         return (numTabs > 0) ? 
                 tabs.Aggregate((sum, next) => sum + next) : ""; 
     } 

can be rewritten more compactly with String.Concat:

private string Tabs(uint numTabs)
    {       
        return String.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat("\t", (int) numTabs));
    }
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Using String.Concat and Enumerable.Repeat which will be less expensive than using String.Join

public static Repeat(this String pattern, int count)
{
    return String.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(pattern, count));
}
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Definitely don't do the last. Each time the loop runs, you are creating another string object in memory. Using this function multiple times on a dataset could lead you to OutOfMemory exceptions.

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The answer really depends on the complexity you want. For example, I want to outline all my indents with a vertical bar, so my indent string is determined as follows:

return new string(Enumerable.Range(0, indentSize*indent).Select(
  n => n%4 == 0 ? '|' : ' ').ToArray());
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Let's say you want to repeat '\t' n number of times, you can use;

String.Empty.PadRight(n,'\t')
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var str = new string(Enumerable.Repeat('\t', numTabs).ToArray());
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