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Let's suppose we have a base class which has a virtual method:

class BaseClass
{
    virtual void MethodToOverride() const
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
};

And a derived class which overrides the method (depending on the situation we can make it again virtual or not):

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
    void MethodToOverride() const
    {
        DoSomethingElse();
    }
}

If we make a mistake, for example defining the MethodToOverride non const or with a wrong character, we simply define a new method, for example:

void MethodToOverride() {} // I forgot the const 
void MthodToOverride() const {} // I made a typo

So this compiles fine, but causes unwanted behavior at runtime.

Is there any way to define a function as an explicit override of an existing one, so the compiler warns me if I define it wrongly? Something like (I know it does not exist):

void MethodToOverride() const overrides BaseClass::MethodToOverride() const {} 
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"(depending on the situation we can make it again virtual or not)" ? The method will be virtual whether your actually mark it as virtual or not, so I don't really understand what you mean by this comment. –  Matthieu M. Nov 7 '10 at 14:43
    
yes, I realized it's wrong –  martjno Nov 7 '10 at 15:20
    
After getting some very good answer I had some difficulty to accept only one: I accepted Alf's one because it was the trick I was looking for, but I liked also Paul's vote for best style and Vitaut for the future... thanks to everybody –  martjno Nov 7 '10 at 15:29
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++0x offers an attribute for this (see vitaut's answer), and e.g. Visual C++ offers a language extension.

But in portable C++98 the best you can do is a sanity check, that the base class offers an accessible member function that accepts the same arguments, like ...

// The following macro is mainly comment-like, but performs such checking as it can.
#define IS_OVERRIDE_OF( memberSpec, args ) \
    suppressUnusedWarning( sizeof( (memberSpec args, 0) ) )

where

template< typename T >
inline void suppressUnusedWarning( T const& ) {}

You call the macro in your override implementation, with the function's actual arguments.

EDIT Added call example (disclaimer: untouched by compiler's hands):

class BaseClass
{
protected:
    virtual void MethodToOverride() const
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
protected:
    void MethodToOverride() const
    {
        IS_OVERRIDE_OF( BaseClass::MethodToOverride, () );
        DoSomethingElse();
    }
};

Using such a sanity check can improve the clarity of the code in certain cases, and can save your ass in certain cases. It has three costs. (1) Someone Else might mistake it for a guarantee, rather than just an informative comment and partial check. (2) the member function can't be private in the base class, as it is in your example (although that's perhaps positive). (3) Some people react instinctively negatively to any use of macros (they've just memorized a rule about badness without understanding it).

Cheers & hth.,

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Can you do any better at testing the parameters? Perhaps by assigning &BaseClass::MethodToOverride to a (DerivedClass::*)(params_of_this_function). I ask because I suspect that using the wrong integer type might be a common way to fail to override a function. –  Steve Jessop Nov 7 '10 at 13:53
    
@Steve: would be simple if C++98/03 had typeof... Repeating all the param types in the invocation might just be too verbose? I mean, there are lots of fancy solutions to corner case problems, like Boost's automatic param types, that are not used simply because it's too much to type and too much too read and maintain. War story, although Java: I once had to help someone with a datestamp management class. First gave her version without JavaDoc. OK, thanks, great, can use this, yes! Then same code with JavaDoc: Alf, I don't understand this at all! T'was just the added verbiage. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 7 '10 at 15:02
    
Hopefully it isn't much harder to repeat the types than it is to repeat the names of the params as the macro is right now, but I agree it is a bit harder on average. As for Javadoc: that's why comments are always pale grey in my syntax highlighting settings (with black background), or pale green (with white). –  Steve Jessop Nov 7 '10 at 17:30
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The best way is to declare the method to be pure virtual in BaseClass.

class BaseClass 
{ 
    virtual void MethodToOverride() const = 0;
};

If implementing classes are inherited again (which I would put in question as a semi good practice), there is no way to control the correct implementation.

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This is pretty much the only way of doing this in current C++, but it only works if you're inheriting from an abstract base class, which is quite limiting... –  rubenvb Nov 7 '10 at 12:16
    
This is a great way and I would definitely recommend using pure virtual instead of simply virtual. Never inherit from a concrete class (unless you know exactly why), instead always inherit from purely abstract classes. Simple rules, but very effective! –  Daniel Lidström Nov 7 '10 at 13:58
    
....................... How Do I delete comments? –  nakiya Nov 7 '10 at 18:59
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[[override]] attribute. However it is a part of C++0x.

If you are using gcc consider the -Woverloaded-virtual command-line option.

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1  
It's going to become a real keyword in C++0x. They found that attributes aren't any good for this. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 7 '10 at 12:00
    
It's already supported by some compilers - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z8ew2153(v=VS.90).aspx –  Pete Kirkham Nov 7 '10 at 12:07
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If your base class may be an abstract one, then the solution is to make the methods you want to be overriden pure virtual. In this case the compiler will yell if you try to instantiate the derived class. Note that pure virtual functions can also have definitions.

E.g.

class BaseClass
{
    virtual void MethodToOverride() const = 0;
    //let's not forget the destructor should be virtual as well! 
};

inline void BaseClass::MethodToVerride const()
{
    DoSomething();
}
//note that according to the current standard, for some inexplicable reasons the definition
//of a pure virtual function cannot appear 'inline' in the class, only outside

If you cannot afford your base class to be abstract, then C++03 gives little to do and @vitaut's answer gives what you need for C++0x.

There was a sentence in your question which alarmed me. You say you can choose to make the method further virtual or not. Well, you can't, in C++03. If the method has been declared virtual it will be virtual throughout the hierarchy, whether you explicitly specify it or not. E.G.

class A
{
    virtual void f(){}
} ;
class B: public A
{
   void f(); //same as virtual void f();
};
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Thanks for specifying it, I didn't get it right. –  martjno Nov 7 '10 at 15:24
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You can try this: :)

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Base
{
    public:
        virtual void YourMethod(int) const = 0;
};

class Intermediate : private Base
{
    public:
        virtual void YourMethod(int i) const
        {
            cout << "Calling from Intermediate : " << i << "\n";
        }
};

class Derived : public Intermediate, private Base
{
    public:
        void YourMethod(int i) const
        {
            //Default implementation
            Intermediate::YourMethod(i);

            cout << "Calling from Derived : " << i << "\n";
        }
};

int main()
{
    Intermediate* pInterface = new Derived;
    pInterface->YourMethod(10);
}

I think the code speaks for itself. Base makes sure you implement the function with the correct signature (As a side effect makes you always implement it, even though you can use default behavior) while Intermediate which is the interface makes sure that there is a default implementation. However, you are left with a warning :).

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