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i'm trying to debug a program, that i don't have the source code for: explorer.exe

It's a native Win32 application from Microsoft, and symbols are avilable.

All i need now is a (graphical) debugger that supports symbols.

  • OllyDbg is a graphical debugger, but doesn't support symbols.
  • Delphi is a graphical debugger, but doesn't support symbols.
  • WinDbg is not a graphical debugger, which supports symbols.
  • Visual C# Express Edition is not Win32 a debugger.
  • Process Explorer supports symbols, but isn't a debugger
  • Process Monitor supports symbols, but isn't a debugger

Have any new graphical debuggers that support Microsoft's symbols server, been written in the last 6 months that i don't know about?


A graphical debugger is one where you can see the disassembly, and can Step Into and Stop Over instructions, e.g.:

Delphi

alt text

OllyDebug:

alt text

IDA Pro

alt text

WinDbg does not show you a series of instructions:

alt text

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Could you clarify what you mean by "graphical debugger"? For instance, although windbg appears to be very command-driven, it also has alternate "visual" interfaces for most of its functionality. –  reuben Jan 4 '09 at 22:33
    
Uh, yeah... Not really sure how OllyDbg rates as "graphical" but WinDbg doesn't. –  Shog9 Jan 4 '09 at 23:46
    
WinDbg actually does show you lists of instructions--you just need to find the right views and windows in its menus. It can even do source-level debugging just like Visual Studio; just make sure that your PDBs are full and that you point WinDbg to where your source code lives. –  reuben Jan 5 '09 at 3:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well, compared to cdb, WinDbg is a graphical debugger, albeit not the most friendly one in the world!

Visual Studio Pro is certainly a graphical debugger and supports symbol server, so you could try Visual Studio C++ Express.

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1  
WinDBG is teh l33t! Perhaps he meant a debugger with buttons to click rather than have to type commands. –  gbjbaanb Jan 5 '09 at 0:54
    
Sort of. i like to see the assembly instructions; where i can step into and step over them. –  Ian Boyd Jan 5 '09 at 2:31

If by "Graphical Debugger", you mean it will show you the assembly code, then WinDBG is what you are actually looking for. You just need to know where to find the things you are looking for:

  • alt-6 Call Stack
  • alt-7 Disassembly

If you open the Window menu, you can select Automatically Open Disassembly. That will cause the Disassembly for a particular stack frame to be opened when you click it in the Call Stack window.

Admittedly, WinDBG doesn't have all those pretty colors the others have, but it is exteremely functional.

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Windbg can certainly meet your goal to see the assembly instructions.

Open the disassembly window with View->Disassembly.

Note: Windbg has 2 modes "source mode on" and "source mode off", so by default you can work only with the functions you have source for. Look for the toolbar icons:

alt text

Or set with the windbg commands l+t or l-t.

Your example shows you are using a symbol server, but for benefit of others, one starting point is with the MS and Firefox public symbol servers:

srv*c:\Symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols;srv*c:\Symbols*http://symbols.mozilla.org/firefox
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The Visual Studio C++ Express addition supports both managed (.Net) and native (Win32) debugging. It has support for symbol server.

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i cannot figure out how to make it debug a Win32 application, or get it to use symbols. –  Ian Boyd Nov 23 '09 at 18:34
    
See the associated question: stackoverflow.com/questions/360912/… which details efforts to try to debug using Visual Studio –  Ian Boyd Nov 23 '09 at 18:36

Check out IDA Pro: http://www.hex-rays.com/idapro/

It is both a disassembler and debugger and supports symbols.

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